Getting to know: Corey Stephens

Arizona State signee Corey Stephens grew up a Sun Devils fan and has dreamed of playing for the program since an early age.

Name: Corey Stephens

Hometown: Scottsdale, Arizona 

School: Saguaro 

Position: Offensive line 

Height: 6-foot-3

Weight: 290 pounds

Scout ranking: No. 46 offensive guard nationally, No. 1 offensive guard in Arizona

Scholarship offers: ASU, Air Force, Army, Cornell, Brown, Dartmouth, Louisville, Memphis, Princeton 

Favorite food: Pizza

Favorite drink: Arnold Palmer

Favorite movie: Saving Private Ryan

Favorite type of music: Country and classic rap

Favorite artists: Queen and Boston

Favorite female celebrity: Carrie Underwood

Favorite NFL player: Larry Fitzgerald

Favorite hobbies: Target shooting and camping

Personal role model: "Lyle Sendlein, former Arizona Cardinals' center. He went to my middle school and he was a role model of mine growing up. He's someone I modeled myself after when I just started playing football in fifth grade."

On when he knew he could play at the next level: "I would say my sophomore year at the big man competition at ASU. I had a really good day, it was my first year that I was starting on varsity and like any young kid going against kids that are 18 years old when you're 15 or 16, I was a little nervous. And then I came out of my day thinking to myself I could hold my own, I'm better than these kids, they're older than me and that really opened my eyes up to knowing that I could play at that level and knowing I could be good enough to play D1 football. It all kind of started for me in my sophomore year and I didn't give up a sack all year. That really proved to me and my family that I could play at that level so that definitely opened my eyes."

On moving to ASU and being on his own: "I'm really excited, I'm excited to have some things on my own and have my own place to take care of, dorm room, apartment, whatever it's going to be. Also just being fully responsible for myself as far as getting things done and time management, those are things I've always done pretty well at. Just all of that really excites me and the prospect of me graduating with a master's is a really big goal of mine. Obviously graduating in three and a half years and trying to finish up my master's before I use up all of my eligibility, if that's possible, that's a big goal of mine and I'm really excited for that."

On his education: "I'm not exactly sure, I'm leaning toward doing something in the business realm. Engineering would have been a choice of mine, but I don't think I could have pulled that off with Barrett Honors and playing football and engineering, that would have been pretty tough. But I'm leaning somewhere in the business world, maybe business supply chain or something in that area, but something in W.P. Carey."

Why ASU: "Just growing up as a fan, I grew up watching and dreaming of running around on that field and that was the only team I watched. I think that's the first true football game I ever watched when I was eight or nine years old when I really got interested in watching football was ASU. From that point on, I'd always just had a dream of playing for ASU and I'm very proud of where I'm from. I'm born and raised here, my parents were born and raised here, my mom's parents were both born and raised here, which is pretty unusual for Arizona, people are usually moving in. So I have a strong feel of where I'm from and I get to represent that."

On being a part of the strong local class: "It just means a lot for us, I think we're starting to finally see the shift in families moving around and being from different areas and not being a lot of Arizona ties even though these kids are living in Arizona, I think it's shifting away from that. Kids are now born here and they're fans and they want to play for Arizona State unlike in the past and I think that establishing a pipeline at Saguaro, while that's not exactly what we were trying to do, we chose ASU because it's the best place for us. But indirectly, making a pipeline really could help ASU in the future. We've always got prospects coming through, we could propel ASU to being a big pipeline for ASU." 

On approaching his freshman season: "I'm looking at it as a chance to get bigger, faster and stronger. I'm not coming in there with the mentality that I'm just going to redshirt, I don't think that's the right way to do it. If I redshirt, if they choose to redshirt me, I know that's the best thing for me, but I won't have any problem doing it, but I'm going to come in with the mentality that I'm going to compete every day and compete for playing time. Whether it happens like that, they're going to make the decision that's best for me and for my future and I'm going to be happy and content with it. If a redshirt does happen, I'm going to be working my butt off in the weight room and on the field to get stronger and that type of stuff. I'm a team player, I consider myself a team player, and I know that they're going to do what's best for me and do what's best for the team in the future. So if that involves redshirting, I'm absolutely alright with it."

On new offensive line coach Josh Henson: "I love him and all of the players seem to love him already. He's a real good dude, on my official visit, me and my family had a lot of long talks with him. He calls me all the time and he's a great dude and he's such a great coach. He's had some guys go to the NFL, he's coached at Missouri and Oklahoma State and LSU and a lot of interior centers and guards have gotten on NFL rosters. That just proves that for the position I play, and I'm being a little selfish here, that I think he's going to be a great mentor to have and a great person to learn from. He's definitely a player's coach as well and you get that vibe from him. He's not just going to be your best friend, he's going to coach you up and coach you hard and he really relates well with the players. I think all of the players, the current linemen at ASU right now, I think they say that right away and I'm really excited about that."


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