Cats confirm Rison to coach receivers

Mose Rison, wide receivers coach for the New York Jets the past two seasons and a veteran of the Pac-10 Conference, has been hired to coach receivers at the University of Arizona.

"We are indeed fortunate to have Mose Rison coach our wide receivers," UA head coach John Mackovic said. "He is an accomplished coach at the Division I-A and NFL levels and has tutored several outstanding players. He will be able to join us immediately and will learn our offense easily. We also will be aided by his contributions to the personal development of young players and his insights into our offensive planning for the year."

"Obviously I'm excited about being here," Rison said. "I remember a lot of good things about Arizona football from my time at Stanford. It's a great opportunity to be part of a great coaching staff. I tried a few times to be on various coach Mackovic staffs, but it didn't work out at the time. This is an exciting prospect," he said.

Rison replaced Mike Borich, who was hired earlier this year but left the staff for personal reasons on June 9. Rison will join four other new coaches on Mackovic's staff for the 2003 season.

Rison, 47, has been in college coaching since 1981 when he joined the staff at his alma mater, Central Michigan, for a year as graduate assistant. He was promoted to receivers coach in 1982, and also worked with special teams. He was with the Chippewas until 1988 when he became receivers coach and kick return teams coach at the U.S. Naval Academy. From 1991 through the 1994 season he was receivers coach at Rutgers University, also coaching tight ends and the punt return unit.

At Rutgers, Rison was instrumental in the growth of tight ends Marco Battaglia, James Jenkins and wide receiver Chris Brantley, all of whom went on to the National Football League as draft selections.

From 1995 through 2000 Rison was wide receivers coach for Stanford University, also working with punt and kickoff return units. The 2000 Cardinal club was the Pac-10 champion, losing to Wisconsin, 17-9, in the Rose Bowl. Rison coached the top two receivers in Stanford history, Troy Walters from 1996-99 and DeRonnie Pitts from 1997-2000.

Walters was the 1999 winner of the Biletnikoff Award and the Pac-10 Offensive Player of the Year. Pitts was an all-league selection in 2000.

Rison turned to the professional ranks in February 2001, coaching wide receivers for the New York Jets in 2001 and 2002. He was instrumental in developing Laveranues Coles and first-round draft pick Santana Moss. Last year Coles had 97 catches for 1,330 yards while Moss added 54 receptions for 742 yards. Rison's unit was dubbed "Six Feet Under" by New York scribes because his receivers were predominantly less than six feet in height. The Jets were an AFC Wildcard playoff team in 2001 and AFC Champions last season.

During his collegiate coaching career he served a number of NFL summer internships for league clubs including a 1988 stint with Detroit, the Jets in 1992, the Chicago Bears in 1999 and the Baltimore Ravens in 2000, as part of the league's Minority Coaching fellowship program.

Rison coached in three bowl games for Stanford, the 1996 Liberty Bowl, the 1997 Sun Bowl and the 2000 Rose Bowl.

A native of Flint, Mich., Rison played for Central Michigan from 1974 to 1977 as a running back, leading the Chippewas in rushing with 1,241 yards in 1977, at the time the No. 10 figure in CMU history. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1978 and was awarded a master's degree in 1982.

Rison served as assistant community director at Dolan Junior High School in Mt. Morris, Mich., in 1979, also substitute teaching for the Beecher Public Schools. He taught history, was the head coach for freshman basketball and was a football assistant at Mt. Morris High from 1979-81.

Rison and his wife, Marilynn, have two daughters, Dominique, 17, and Tara, 14. Rison's cousin, Andre Rison, was a 12-year NFL veteran and five-time Pro Bowl receiver.

Correction: Cat Tracks erroneously reported in an earlier story that Mose Rison and Andre Rison were brothers, not cousins.

Discuss this story on the FOOTBALL MESSAGE BOARDS

Wildcat Authority Top Stories