Gifted Long-Range Bombers and Adept Passers

To celebrate the 25th Anniversary of the Boise State Taco Bell Arena (formerly known as the Pavilion), join us in choosing the All-Time Boise State basketball team. First, a look at the All-Time Guards.

As Taco Bell Arena (formerly the Boise State Pavilion) enters its 25th season, BroncoCountry will select an All-Time Boise State Basketball Team.  We begin with the guards.  Boise State has been blessed with a long string of talented guards that can shoot the lights out and point guards that can thread the needle to an open opponent.   Here are just a few of the great Bronco guards.  Read the story, and then vote for your favorites in the All-Time Basketball Team Polls on the Taco Bell Arena page.

 

Damon Archibald (1992-1995)

 

Damon's understanding of the game of basketball is attributed to being the son of longtime coach Lynn Archibald.  He not only was a good shooter, but an excellent passer and defender.  In other words, he fit in nicely with Coach Bobby Dye's philosophy.

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketArchibald ranks 8th in school history with 129 steals.  Archibald's 1992-93 team set records in limiting opponents to just 60 three-pointers and only 195 three-point attempts.  They are 2nd in three-point defense, as opponents managed just 30.8% shooting, and tied for 3rd with 109 blocked shots.  They are also tied for 5th with 21 victories, in free throws with 511 and in free throws attempted with 712.  His junior team set a school record with 143 blocked shots and ranks 2nd in assists with 520, 4th in field goals with 848 and 5th in both steals with 267 and rebounds with 1,099.  They also were a force on defense, limiting opponents to 43.6% shooting (4th all-time).     

 

Archibald led the Broncos in three-point shooting his sophomore year with 35% shooting (21-60) and paced the team in steals his senior year with 49. 

 

Damon helped the Broncos win back-to-back Big Sky Conference Tournaments, contributing right away his sophomore year when Boise State went 21-8 overall and 10-4 in the league.  Coach Bobby Dye's team downed Weber State 69-63 and Idaho 80-68 to qualify for the school's third NCAA Tournament, where they played Vanderbilt.  Archibald and the Broncos came back the following year to capture the post-season title despite a 17-13 record, 7-7 in the Big Sky.  Boise State defeated Montana State 75-57, Weber State 84-72 and Idaho State 85-81 to earn another spot in the Big Dance.  The Broncos fell far behind Louisville and a late-game rally fell short with the Cardinals winning 67-58.

 

Archibald's Broncos finished his senior year 17-10, 7-7 in the Big Sky, defeating Pepperdine 74-53, San Jose State 70-61, Nevada 69-51, Utah State 81-68 and St. Mary's 80-56 and Rice 87-74 on the way to a 9-2 non-conference mark.  A 65-63 loss to Idaho State in the Big Sky Tournament ended their season. 

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketArchibald is currently an assistant coach at New Mexico State, helping the Aggies win the Western Athletic Conference postseason tournament last year.  Prior to that, Archibald coached at Iowa State, where he helped the Cyclones to two postseason appearances in three years as Associate Head Coach.  He also coached at USC for three years, helping the Trojans to an Elite 8 Appearance.  Archibald has also coached at Pepperdine in 1999-2000, as the Waves had a 25-9 record and a second-round appearance in the NCAA Tournament, and served as Jerry Tarkanian's recruiting coordinator at Fresno State from 1997 to 1999.  While Archibald was in Fresno, the Bulldogs won at least 20 games each season and advanced to the NIT Final Four in 1998.

 

 

 

Rodger Bates (1980-1982)

 

Bates is 5th in Bronco history for assists in a season with 128 in 1980-81.  He led the Broncos in that department in his junior year with 99 as well as '80-81. 

 

Bates and the Broncos are 5th all-time for free throws attempted in a year with 494 his junior year.

 

The Broncos suffered a 7-19 season in 1980-81, but improved only slightly the following year with an 11-15 mark.

 

 

 

Roberto Bergersen (1996-1999)

 

While at Boise State, Bergersen was a go-to guy that could penetrate the lane as well as bury the three-pointer.  He could manufacture points.  Although he played only three seasons, Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobuckethe still poured in 1,485 points for fifth on the all-time list, averaging 17.3 points from 1996 to 1999.  That average is ranked fourth behind only Ron Austin, Steve Connor and Tanoka Beard.  Roberto is also ranked second all-time in career free throw percentage, a sizzling 80.8%, fourth in three-point field goals (163), fourth in three-point attempts (407), fifth in career field goals made (535), field goals attempted (1,098), sixth in three-point percentage (40.049%) and steals (138) and 10th in free throws made (252).

 

Bergersen is 2nd all-time in scoring average for a season (1998-99).  He also places fifth for his 1997-98 season (19.4).  Roberto is one of only three Broncos in history to score 500 or more points in two different seasons—Tanoka Beard scored over 500 in three different seasons and Abe Jackson did it twice.  He posted similar rankings for field goals made (2nd in '98 and 4th in '97) and field goal attempts (3rd in '98 and 7th in '97).  Bergersen ranks 3rd in free throw percentage during his senior season, when he canned 85.6%, shooting 125 of 146.  He is also fifth and seventh in three-pointers in a season, fourth in three-point attempts (1998-99), 10th in free throws made in a season (125 during his senior season) and 10th in steals, when he swiped 54 during his senior year.  Bergersen is tied for the Bronco record with 30 games started his junior year and tied for fourth in games played.  In 1998-99, he joined Ron Austin as the only Broncos to score 600 points in one season, when set an all-time record with 644.  His 582 points during his junior year ranks third. 

 

Bergersen's 1998-99 team is tied for fourth for the best Boise State season with 21 wins.  In his initial season at Boise State, Bergersen helped the Broncos set an all-time record for defense, holding opponents to just 1,678 points for the season.  Bronco opponents scored just 62.1 points per game that year, which ranks fifth all-time.  That same year, his Broncos set the all-time record for three-pointers, when they sent 223 howitzers into the basket.  The following year, Boise State made another 221 for 2nd and in Bergersen's senior year, they canned 172 for fifth all-time.  In his sophomore season, Bergersen and Boise State set an all-time record by allowing the fewest blocked shots by the opposition, just 44 the entire year.  During Bergersen's career, Boise State ranked second in limiting opponents to just 1,236 field goal attempts and in opposition assists (283) his sophomore year, third in three-point attempts for the opposition in his junior year and second in opposition rebounding average (30.5), third in scoring average-defense (61.7 points per game), fourth in steals (277) his senior season.   

 

Roberto led the Broncos in scoring in both his junior and senior seasons, free throw percentage (85.6%) and steals (54) his senior year and in field goal percentage (51.4%) his junior year. 

 

When he came to Boise State, he instantly improved the Broncos' ability to create plays inside.  The Broncos were 14-13 overall and 9-7 in the Big West during their first season since moving from the Big Sky.  Bergersen and the Broncos won the Albertson's Holiday Classic by beating Gonzaga 73-64 and also downed BYU in Provo 65-58 and shocked Pepperdine 65-52.  They lost narrow contests to Pac-10 teams at both Oregon (61-58) and Washington State 74-59.  Boise State also defeated Eastern Michigan 73-61 on ESPN.   Boise State was upset in the first round of the Big West Tournament by Pacific 68-52.

 

Boise State was 17-13 his first year, 9-7 in the Big West, including a 83-67 win over BYU, a 79-72 victory over Washington State of the Pac-10, an 83-60 win over Weber State.  Other impressive wins came against New Mexico State (71-59), Nevada (77-67) and Utah State (57-49).  Boise State nearly pulled off a shocker in Westwood, leading the hometown UCLA Bruins the entire game before falling 81-75 at the end.  The Broncos were upset in the first round of the Big West Tournament again, falling to Cal-State Fullerton 89-82. 

 

The following season, Bergersen led the Broncos to a 21-8 record (12-4 in the Big West) to capture the Big West East Division Championship.  It was Boise State's first title since 1994.  The Broncos downed #17 Washington 69-61 in the Pavilion in 1998, one of three wins over a Top 25 team in Bronco history.  Bergersen and Boise State lost to two ranked teams (Indiana and Gonzaga) that year.  The Broncos also blitzed Nevada (77-52) and defeated the West Division Champion New Mexico State Aggies twice (67-48 and 70-48) only to lose to them in the Big West Tournament Championship.  Despite their sparking 21-8 record and tough schedule, Boise State was left out of not only the NCAA Tournament but the National Invitation Tournament as well.    

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketBergersen was honored as a First-Team All-Big West Conference selection in both 1998 and 1999, and was chosen as the Big West Conference Player of the Year in 1999.  He was also selected as the Tournament Most Valuable Player in 1999.  Roberto was selected in the second round of the National Basketball Association Draft by the Atlanta Hawks.  He played in the NBA Summer League with both Portland and Sacramento and was also on the Milwaukee Bucks roster briefly.  He is currently with the Boca Juniors of Argentina.  He has played with various European teams including Cholet (France) Dongbu (Korea), Palma Aqua (Spain), Karsiyaka (Turkey) and Melilla (Spain).  While with Karsiyaka, Bergersen made the Turkish League All-Star team.  Bergersen is averaging 13.5 points per game in his European career.

 

Roberto averaged 7.7 points and 2 assists per game with the Idaho Stampede in 1999-2000 and played in the All-Rookie game.  The following year, he played with the Stampede and averaged 14.6 points, four rebounds and 2.8 assists per game.  Bergersen came back for another season with the Stampede in 2003-2004, averaging 16.0 points, 2.6 rebounds, three assists and 1.3 steals per game while leading the team to the CBA Finals.  Bergersen also played with Dodge City of the United States Basketball League in 2004, averaging 17.4 points, 3.9 rebounds, 2.8 assists and 1.1 steal per game and helping Dodge City to the USBL Semifinals.  Bergersen was named to the USBL All-Star team that season.

 

 

 

Jermaine Blackburn(2003-2005)

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketBlackburn made 197 field goals in 2004-05, the 7th best season total.  Blackburn's 457 attempts that year ranks fourth in Bronco history.  He is one of just seven Broncos to score 500 or more points in a season.  He scored 523 his senior year.

 

He led the team in scoring his senior year with a 15.4 average.

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketJermaine and the Broncos won 23 games his junior year, the second best season ever at Boise State.  Since they played so many games in the season, those teams are in the record books often in terms of sheer numbers but not so when averages are compared.  The 2,431 and 2,393 points scored in Blackburn's two seasons, for instance are 1 & 2 in season points but not in scoring average.  Likewise, the field goals of 852 and 856 are 3rd and fourth.  In Jermaine's junior year, the team ranks fourth for field goals attempted with 1,904.  The1,987 field goal attempts in his senior year is second.  The 221 three-pointers in 2003-04 and 263 the following year are fourth and first respectively.  The 639 three-point attempts his junior year and 735 his senior season rank #1 and #2.  The 1,136 rebounds in 2003-04 and 1,193 rebounds in 2004-2005 are 2nd and 3rdall-time.  Blackburn and the Broncos did a number on the opposition, allowing 43.2% shooting, which ranks fourth in the Bronco record books.  Their three-point percentage defense of 31% is tied for third.

 

Blackburn was named to the All-WAC Tournament team in 2005 after leading the Broncos to wins over the #9, #1 and #4 seeds before losing to UTEP in the championship game.

 

Blackburn averaged 7.6 points and 2.9 rebounds with the Idaho Stampede last year and played in the NBA Summer League with the Cleveland Cavaliers.  He made the West Sydney Razorbacks of the Europe League but was waived shortly after the season began.  Blackburn is now playing for Gary of the United States Basketball League, where he is averaging 5.3 points and 3.7 rebounds a game.

 

 

 

 

Chris Childs (1985-1989)

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketChris Childs was the prototype Bobby Dye recruit.  He had amazing athletic ability, was a good shooter that shot intelligent shots, played aggressive defense and excelled at the fundamentals.  He had great court awareness, seeming to be in the right place at the right time.  This helped him be an excellent rebounder for the Broncos from his guard position.  He also played with considerable poise and was never shaken on the court, even as a freshman.  He was a thrill to watch for four seasons.

 

Childs' value to Boise State is apparent in his 118 career starts for the Broncos, an all-time record.  He also holds school records for career steals (215) and free-throw percentage (81.8%).  Childs is 5th in career points with 1,602 and carried a 13.6 scoring average through his four years.  He is third in all-time assists only to Steve Connor and Coby Karl.  Chris is third in three-point percentage to Brian King and Wilson Foster, connecting on 163 of 386 attempts for an impressive 42.2%.   He is fourth in career free throws with 359 and 5th in free-throw attempts with 439.  Chris is also fourth in career field goals with 540 and third in attempts with 1,219.  Childs is tied for 6th in three-pointers and is 7th for three-point attempts. 

 

Childs is 4th in the record books for free throw percentage in a season, hitting 85% (81-95) his junior year.  He also ranks 8th for his sophomore year when he made 109 of 132 attempts for 82.6%.  Childs is also ranked 3rd (45.0%) and 8th (43.7%) in three-point percentage for his junior and senior seasons, respectively.  His defensive prowess is evidenced by his steals.  Chris is ranked 4th, 5th and 7th all-time for his final three seasons at Boise State.  He is the only player to be ranked in steals in three different seasons.  Plus, he dished out 122 assists his senior year, tied for 7th all-time.

 

The 1987-88 team still is the standard at Boise State, with a record 24 wins.  That team also set records with an incredible 52.4% field goal percentage and a three-point percentage of 44.7% as a team.  They are also 2nd in steals with 308.  Chris's sophomore team set a Bronco record with 344 steals and ranks 2nd in free-throw attempts (792), 3rd in free throws (544), 4th in field goal percentage (49.7%) and three-point percentage (39.1%) and 6th in points (2,196).  In his senior season, Childs helped the Broncos shoot 49.6% (5th)--giving Chris a hand in three of the best five team shooting seasons in school history.  They also hit 44.1% three-pointers, as Chris is represented on three of those five records as well.  His senior team is also 2nd in steals allowed (158) and tied for 3rd in free throw percentage (71.9%). 

 

But Childs' years at Boise State was the epitome of Coach Dye's philosophy—aggressive, hand-in-your-face defense.  The 1987-88 team holds defensive records for scoring average-defense, limiting opponents to 56.3 points a game, and rebound average for opponents (29.1).  They are also 3rd in points allowed (1,680), 4th in field goals allowed (580), three-pointers allowed (75) and three-point attempts allowed (231) and 5th in rebounds allowed (874) and assists allowed (312).  The 1988-89 team is 2nd in scoring average defense (58.9), 3rd in field goals allowed (576), 4th in field goal attempts allowed (1,287).  The 1986-87 team is 2nd in three-pointers allowed (68) and three-point attempts allowed (212) and 3rd in assists allowed (294).    

 

Chris led the team in scoring his sophomore year with 300 points (10.7 average).  He also was the best free throw shooter in three of his four seasons, joining only Abe Jackson and Steve Connor with that distinction.  Chris hit 79.1% in 1985-86, 82.6% the following year and 85.3% his junior season.  He paced the Broncos in three-point shooting his sophomore year, connecting on 47 of 116 attempts for 40.5%.  In the years in which Doug Usitalo wasn't working his magic, Childs led the team in assists, collecting 84 his freshman season and 122 his senior year. 

 

Childs played guard in the most successful four years in Bronco history—1985-1989.  In his first year, Boise State was in a rebuilding year and went 12-16 overall and 6-8 in the Big Sky.  However, the Broncos won 20 games for the first time as a four-year school in 1986-87, finishing 22-8 with a 10-4 Big Sky mark.  They scored an impressive win over Cal-Irvine 80-71.  A 78-77 upset loss to Idaho State in the opening round of the Big Sky Tournament landed them in their first-ever National Invitation Tournament.  The Broncos hosted Utah in the opener and won 62-61.  Childs and Boise State then traveled to Seattle and led Washington the entire first half before losing 73-68.

 

Childs' junior season, of course, was the magic year when the Broncos started the season 16-1 and were ranked #23 in the nation.  They defeated St. Mary's 61-52 on the road and 56-48 at home and Gonzaga 89-49.  Boise State defeated Idaho State 87-56 in the Big Sky Tournament and then downed host team Montana State 63-61 when Childs hit a layup with two seconds remaining to win the league title.  Boise State was in the NCAA Tournament for the first time in 12 years.  The Broncos drew Michigan in the first round of the NCAA Tournament, a well-schooled team that featured seven players that would go on to the National Basketball Association.  Boise State fell behind by as many as 21 with 10:30 remaining, only to stage a furious comeback led by Childs that had the Broncos within 3 points.  Boise State launched two three-point attempts that would have sent the game into overtime but both missed the mark.  All told, the Broncos faced three Top 10 teams, and all were decided in the final seconds.  Boise State lost to Wyoming 59-55 and 56-50 and then to Michigan 63-58. 

 

Lest anyone think that Arnell Jones was the main reason for the success of 1987-88, Childs came back his senior year and led the team to a 23-7 record without Jones.  The Broncos won the Big Sky title with a sparking 13-3 record, the same as the year before.  They defeated Gonzaga 73-65, Wisconsin-Green Baby 68-66 and Pepperdine 63-60 on the road.  With Childs guarding future NBA great Gary Payton, the Broncos scored their second win over a Top 20 opponent when they defeated Oregon State 53-43 in the Pavilion.  Boise State defeated Weber State 71-60 in the first round of the Big Sky Tournament, but were upset by Idaho 59-52.  Childs and the Broncos did land another bid in the NIT, where they faced Oklahoma State on the road.

 

Childs made an immediate impression when he was chosen as Big Sky Freshman of the Year in 1986, one of four Broncos to be so honored.  He was an All-Big Sky selection in three of his four years, being named Conference Player of the Year in 1989.  Childs and Arnell Jones are the only two Broncos to win that prestigious award.  He was voted to the All-Tournament team in both 1988 and 1989, winning the Tournament Most Valuable Player Award in'88. 

 

Chris is one of six basketball players in the Boise State Hall of Fame. 

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketChilds played for five different teams in his first three seasons in the Continental Basketball League, but he eventually found a home with the Quad City Thunder, with whom he won a league title and an MVP award in 1994 after averaging 17.9 points and 7.6 assists a game.   That success got the attention of NBA scouts, and he signed with the New Jersey Nets for the 1994-95 season.  Chris played two years with the Nets, everaging 12.8 points in 1995-96.  He was a valuable player with the New York Knicks for five seasons.  He led the Knicks in assists (6.1 per game) as a starter during the 1996-97 season and was a big contributor off the bench during his next four years.   A visible figure in the New York media, he also represented the Knicks on the 1998-99  NBA All-Interview Team and won the New York Press Photographers Association's 2000  "Good Guy Award" for his involvement with several charities and youth basketball programs.

 

In 2001, Childs was traded to the Toronto Raptors for Mark Jackson and Muggsy Bogues.  He played with Toronto for 1 ½ seasons and briefly with the Nets again before finishing his career.   Childs displayed the many talents he learned from Bronco Coach Bobby Dye in the NBA.  He once played Michael Jordan so well defensively that, after eight seconds of Jordan dribbling and putting every possible move on Childs and being unable to shake him, the NBA official was forced to call a foul on Childs to prevent embarrassment to Michael.

 

In his NBA career that lasted a little more than eight years, Childs scored 3,710 points and had 1,308 rebounds, 2,633 assists, 490 steals and 54 blocked shots.  He shot 40.3% (1,288-3,196) from the field, 81.6% (762-934) from the line and 34.4% (372-1,082) from three-point range in his NBA career.  He averaged 6.9 points, 4.9 assists and 2.4 rebounds a game.  Had he played a 40-minute game, those averages shoot up to 10.9 points, 7.7 assists and 3.8 rebounds a game. 

 

Beginning in 1997, Chris averaged 10.4, 6.3, 4.7 and 5.4 points a game in four playoff runs with the Knicks.  Childs helped the Knicks reach the NBA Finals in 1999, where they lost four games to one to the San Antonio Spurs.  The Knicks made it to the Eastern Conference Finals in 2000 before losing 4-2 to Indiana.  Childs averaged 9.1 points and 6.5 assists with Toronto in 2001 and 11.8 points and 7.4 assists in the Raptors' five playoff games in 2002.

 

Childs led the entire NBA in Assists to Turnovers ratio in 2001-2002, and was ranked in the top ten in that category in four of his eight seasons.  Chris earned $25,650,000 in his NBA career. 

 

 

 

Steve Connor (1974-1978)

 

CPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucketonnor was part of an amazing freshman class for Connor's father, Head Boise State Coach Bus Connor, which also included forwards Trent Johnson and Dan Jones.  Connor finished his Boise State career in 1978 as a four-year starter and the 2nd-leading all-time scorer in Bronco history.  An outstanding long-range shooter who would have scored even more had the three-point line been in effect back then, Connor poured in 1,927 points in his career.  His average of 18 points per game is also 2nd in the record books to Ron Austin's 20.5 points a game.  Both his field goals (771) and field goal attempts (1,718) may never be beaten.  He made nearly 100 more field goals than anyone else in Bronco history and attempted 400 more than anyone else.  Steve also holds the Bronco record for career assists with 502, 94 more than another four-year starter, Coby Karl.  Connor also ranks 3rd in free throws (385) and free throws attempted (486) and sixth in free throw percentage at 79.2% (385-486).

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketConnor led the Broncos in scoring in both his junior and senior seasons, hitting at a 19.6 points a game clip his last season (4th all-time).  In fact, Connor is the only player in Boise State history to have all four seasons ranked in the all-time top 20 in scoring average.  Further, he, Chris Childs, Abe Jackson and Coby Karl are the only Broncos in history to score 400 or more points in a season three times. But Connor is the only one of that group to score 400 or more points in all four seasons. Steve scored 457 points his freshman year, 490 in 1975-76, 450 his junior year and 530 his senior season.  Connor topped Boise State in free-throw shooting three of his four years, all at 80 percent or above.  Lest anyone think he was just a shooter, it couldn't be further from the truth.  Honed on basketball skills from a young age from his Coach Dad, Steve understood the game.  He led Boise State in assists two of his years—in fact his 5.6 assists per game in 1976-77 is second only to Freddie Williams' mark two years later in Bronco history. 

 

In Connor's freshman year, Boise State was 13-13, the first .500 year since 1971.  The Broncos had a nice win over Utah State, and also beat Idaho State, Weber State (twice), Idaho, Northern Arizona, Montana State and Gonzaga in the Big Sky.  The following season was the magic year, when Boise State went 18-11 (11-5 in the Big Sky), won the Big Sky Tournament and advanced to the NCAA National Playoffs.  One of the non-league losses was to Kansas (61-56); others were to Oregon (76-64), Fresno State (72-70 in overtime) and Arkansas (72-56).  Boise State would go 11 seasons before compiling a better record.

 

The next two years, despite the experience coming back, Boise State faltered with a 10-16 mark in 1976-77 and 13-14 the following year.  Connor and the Broncos did get a nice win over Oregon State (76-65) and trounced TCU 69-43 his senior year.

   

Connor was part of Bronco teams that are ranked second (82 points a game in1974-75) and fourth (79.1 ppg in '75-76) in scoring in the record book.  In his freshman year, they were second in rebound average (43.1), third in rebounds (1,120), fifth in field goals (847) and field goal attempts (1,795).  In Connor's sophomore year, Boise State set a record for free throws (559) and assists (540) and were second in free-throw percentage (72.8%), third in free throw attempts (768), second in field goals (867), fourth in field goal attempts (1,809) and fifth in rebounds (1,069).  In Steve's senior year, he was a major reason why his team ranks third all-time in assists with 489.

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketConnor was selected to the All-Big Sky Conference team his senior year and second team as a junior.  He was a member of the Big Sky Tournament Team in 1976 and 1978.  Following his college career, Connor was drafted in the 10th round of the National Basketball Association draft by the Washington Bullets.  Appropriately, Connor is one of six basketball players in the Boise State Hall of Fame. 

 

 

 

Bryan Defares (2000-2004)

 

Defares ranks as the 13th leading scorer at Boise State in terms of total points with 1,087.  He is 8th in career free throws with 313 and 6th in attempts with 428.  Bryan also ranks 6th all-time in assists with 298.   

 

Defares led the Broncos in field goal percentage his sophomore season, hitting 45.2%, and in steals with 31.  Bryan also led the team in assists his senior year with 115, a 3.7 average. 

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketDefares was a major reason why the Broncos won 23 games in 2003-04, the 2nd highest total in school history.  That team set Bronco records with 2,431 points and 73.8% free-throw shooting and is 2nd in three-pointers (221), three-point attempts (639) and rebounds (1,136) and 3rd in field goals (852), field goal attempts (1,904) and three-point percentage—defense (31.0%).  Bryan's junior team ranks 3rd all-time in blocked shots with 109 and his freshman team (2000-01) ranks 5th in total points with 2,237 and in steals allowed (180).

 

Defares helped the Broncos to a 17-14 record his freshman year, which included a win over Long Beach State and a loss to Utah State in the Big West Tournament.  The Broncos slipped to 13-17, 6-12 in the WAC the following year.  Boise State upset UTEP 73-72 in overtime in the league tournament but lost to Tulsa.  In Greg Graham's first season as Head Coach, Boise State was 13-16, 7-11 in the WAC.  Defares and Boise State lost their opening round game of the WAC Tournament to SMU. 

 

In Bryan's senior year, the Broncos knocked off Oregon State on the road and defeated highly-regarded UTEP twice (98-94 in El Paso and 59-45 in Boise).  But the Broncos lost to that same UTEP team in the conference tournament 85-73.  Nevertheless, Boise State was selected to play in the National Invitation Tournament, where they destroyed UNLV 84-69, edged Wisconsin-Milwaukee 73-70 and lost to Marquette 66-53.

 

Defares played for Peristeri in the Greek League 2004-05.  He was 2nd in the league in assists and made the All-Bosmans team.  He's now with Doukas Athens.

 

 

 

Clyde Dickey (1972-1974)

 

Dickey averaged 16.1 points a game in his two seasons at Boise State, 5th in the history of Bronco basketball.  Dickey helped the Broncos get 475 assists in 1973-74 to rank 5th all-time.

 

Dickey is tied with Vince Hinchen for 16th with his 17.2 points per game average in 1973-74.

 

Clyde led the Broncos in scoring (17.2 ppg) and free-throw percentage (79-104 for 76%) his senior year.  He paced the team in assists both seasons, handing out 85 his junior year and 84 his senior season.   

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketClyde was Boise State's first All-Big Sky selection in 1974.  He became one of the highest draft selections ever for Boise State when he was chosen in the 5th round of the NBA Draft by the Phoenix Suns. 

 

 

 

Jermaine Haliburton (1991-1993)

 

Jermaine is tied for 13th for both three-pointers in a season with 58 and three-point attempts with 151.  Both of those marks were recorded in the 1991-92 season.  Haliburton is eighth all-time in three-point percentage, hitting 77 of 199 attempts for 38.7%.   

 

Haliburton led the Broncos his junior year in three-point percentage, hitting 38.4% of his long-range bombs (58-151).  He also led the team in assists that year with 107, the 11th-highest total ever. 

 

In Jermaine's first year, Boise State was 16-13, beating St. Mary's and Air Force.  The following year, the Broncos captured the Big Sky Conference Tournament Championship, finishing 21-8 under Head Coach Bobby Dye.  Boise State put together a 10-4 league mark.  The Broncos swept past Weber State (69-63) and Idaho (80-68) to advance to the NCAA National Basketball Tournament, where they lost to Vanderbilt in the first round.

 

The 21 wins in 1992-93 are tied for the fifth-highest total in Bronco history.  In Haliburton's senior year, the Broncos rank fifth in both free throws (511) and free-throw attempts (712).  He helped Boise State set a barrier for opposing three-point shots.  In 1991-92, the Broncos set the all-time record by limiting opponents to a measly 30% shooting from three-point range, and the next year, Haliburton and company held opponents to only 30.8%.  Not only did they have a hand in the face, but often the opposition could not even get the long-range shots off.  Haliburton's team his senior year holds records for fewest opposition three-pointers (195) and three-point attempts (195), while his junior year team is third in three-pointers (70) and fifth in attempt, allowing just 233.   

 

 

 

Franco Harris (2003-2005)

 

Although he played just two seasons, his perimeter accuracy enabled Harris to rank 10th all-time in career three-pointers with 112.  He is also 10th in career three-point percentage, hitting 112 of 293 for 38.3 percent. 

 

Franco led the team in three-pointers his senior year, nailing 69, good for 8th all-time.  He also led the team in three-point percentage with 38.8%.    His 178 attempts that year rank seventh in Bronco history.  

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketHarris helped the Broncos to a 23-10 record in 2003-04, including a 12-6 record in the WAC.  They got a nice win at Oregon State and swept UTEP during the season only to fall 85-73 in the WAC Tournament.  The Broncos were accepted to play in the National Invitation Tournament, however, and defeated UNLV (84-69) and Wisconsin-Milwaukee (73-70) before bowing out to Marquette 66-53.  Franco's senior season under Coach Greg Graham was not as good, as the Broncos were 16-18 overall and just 6-12 in the WAC. 

 

In Franco's junior year, Boise State's 23 wins puts that team second all-time.  They set all-time records with 2,431 points, free-throw percentage (73.8%) and three-point attempts with 639, and rank second in three-pointers (221), second in rebounds with 1,136, and third in field goals (852) and field goal attempts (1,904).  Franco and the Broncos were not just talented on offense.  That same Bronco team ranks third in opposition field goal percentage (43.2%) and third in opposition three-point percentage (31%). 

 

The following year, the Broncos set all-time records for three-pointers with 263 and three-point attempts with 735.  They put up 1,987 field goal attempts, second all-time.  The team made 856 of them, third in the record books. 

 

Franco played in the Mexican Basketball League with Tijuana Galgos last season and is now with Tri Valley T of the International Basketball League. 

 

 

 

Wendell Hart

 

Wendell Hart was a prolific scorer leading the move from junior college to a four-year school.  If all his statistics were counted, Hart would rank as the third all-time scorer in school history with 1,809 points.

 

Hart's 68-69 team set an incredible record of 1,545 rebounds, one that may never be broken.  They also are fourth all-time with 2,249 points and set school records by averaging 83.3 points per game and 956 field goals and 2,146 attempts.  The Broncos held opponents to 38.8% shooting, another all-time record.    

 

Hart followed up a junior college record 1,053 points with a spectacular season in 1968-69, averaging 15.6 points per game, second only to Bill Otey's 16.1.

 

The Broncos finished with a sparkling 26-9 record in 1966-67, winning the Intermountain Conference and earning a spot in the NJCAA national tournament.  Boise State downed Eastern Utah in two out of three games to advance to the regionals, where they beat a Nate Archibald-led Western Arizona 89-86 and TVCC 83-61.  The Broncos advanced to Hutchinson, Kansas, defeating Dodge City, Kansas 91-77 before losing to Moberly, Missouri 70-50 and Powell, Wyoming 84-71.  BJC finished the year ninth in the country.

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketThe amazing Broncos proved that year was no fluke.  The following season, they lost just three times in the regular season.  Coach Murray Satterfield's squad powered through the ICAC and again advanced to Hutchinson.  Hart and the Broncos beat College of Southern Idaho and TVCC in regionals to earn a spot in the national tournament once again.  BJC did not shoot well in losing the opener to Miami Dade 62-55.  A 66-64 win over St. Louis Baptist was followed by a season-ending loss to Iowa Central 85-68.  The Broncos finished the junior college era with a 26-5 record, 10th in the country. 

 

In their first action as a four-year school, Hart and Boise State stumbled out of the blocks with a 3-6 record.  They then proceeded to win 15 games in a row to finish at 18-6.  The Broncos downed Southern Oregon 101-70 in the district playoffs, but ended the season with two consecutive losses to nationally-ranked Linfield, 90-81 and 83-80 in overtime.

 

The Broncos compiled their third 20-win season in Hart's four years in 1969-70.  Boise State finished 20-8 with one of those losses to New Mexico State, the #5 team in the country.  The Broncos played in the NCAA small college tournament, losing the opener against UC-Riverside 83-71 but then rebounding for a 63-61 win over Puget Sound to take third place.

 

Playing with Bill Otey, Keith Burke and Renee Ruth, Hart and the Broncos were 91-29 in their career, the best four-year record in school history.  Recruited as junior college players, they nonetheless remained in Boise to aid the transition to a four-year program.  Hart broke the junior college scoring record with 1,053 points.     

 

 

 

Mike Hazel (1981-1985)

 

Hazel led the team in 1982-83 with 97 assists for a 3.6 average. 

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketHazel and the Broncos averaged 71.9% from the free throw line his freshman season, a mark that is tied for third all-time.  That 1981-82 team is also ranked fourth for team assists with 480.  In his junior year, Mike and the Bronco defense allowed just 61.9 points per game, which ranks fourth all-time.  Boise State allowed just 147 steals that same year, a Bronco record.

 

In his first season, Boise State went 11-15 overall and 6-8 in the Big Sky.  The following season, the Broncos finished 10-17 and 5-9 in league.  Bobby Dye was the new head man in Hazel's junior year, and Boise State responded with a 15-13 record.  Boise State shocked Fresno State in the Pavilion 60-52, the first time a Bronco basketball team had beaten a Top 20 team.  The Broncos also blasted Gonzaga (72-54) and downed Wyoming 66-52. Ten of the 13 losses were by five points or less--4 losses were by one point, two were by two points, one loss by three points, two by four points and one by five points.

 

Boise State finished 16-13 the following year, 5-9 in the Big Sky.  The Broncos upset Larry Krystkowiak and Montana 67-54 in the opening round of the Big Sky Tournament in Boise before bowing out to Nevada 79-67.  

 

 

 

Vince Hinchen (1981-1984)

 

Hinchen transferred from Oregon State in 1981.  Hinchen could do it all—hit from outside, penetrate off the dribble, rebound, and he was a great ball handler and free-throw shooter.

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketHinchen is the #7 scorer in Boise State history with 1,243 points in just three seasons.  He didn't just pile up the points because he played a lot of games—his 15.9 per game scoring average also ranks 7th all-time.  Vince also ranks 7th in career field goals (489) and field goal attempts (1,053) and 10th in career free throws with 265.

 

His 17.6 average in his senior year is the 10th best in school history while his 17.2 average the previous season is tied for 16th with Clyde Dickey. 

 

Hinchen helped the Broncos average 71.9% from the free throw line his sophomore season, a mark that is tied for third all-time.  That 1981-82 team is also ranked fourth for team assists with 480.  In his senior year, Vince led the Bronco defense in allowing 61.9 points per game, which ranks fourth all-time.  His expert ball handling prevented opponents from getting the ball, as Hinchen and Boise State allowed just 147 steals that same year, a Bronco record.

 

Hinchen led his team in scoring in both 1982-83 (459 points for 17.7 per game) and 1983-84 (457 points for a 17.6 scoring average).  He also led the Broncos in free throw shooting (118 of 152 his junior year for 77.6% and 99-135 for 7.28% his senior season). 

 

In his first season, Hinchen and the Broncos were 11-15 overall and 6-8 in the Big Sky.  The following season, the Broncos finished 10-17 and 5-9 in league.  Bobby Dye came to the rescue of Bronco basketball in Hinchen's senior year, and the talented guard made the most of it, leading the team to a 15-13 record.  Improvement was immediate and the Broncos were competitive in nearly every game.  Ten of the 13 losses were by five points or less--4 losses were by one point, two were by two points, one loss by three points, two by four points and one by five points.  The highlight of the year also represented a landmark for the school, a 60-52 win over Fresno State for Boise State's first victory over a Top 20 team. 

 

Hinchen became the first Bronco to make the All-Big Sky team in six years when he was so honored his senior season.  He had been a member of the second team the year before.  Hinchen was selected in the 5th round of the NBA Draft by the Cleveland Cavaliers.

 

 

 

Clint Hordemann (1997-2001)

 

Hordemann led the Broncos in three-point shooting in 1999-2000, hitting 41.4% from beyond the arc.  He also paced the team in steals with 41 that year, and tied with Abe Jackson for the lead the following year with 31. 

 

In Hordemann's first year, the Broncos finished 17-13 overall with a 9-7 Big West Conference record.  They lost by 10 on the road to Washington, and had nice wins over Weber State (83-60), Idaho State (85-68 and 86-51), BYU (83-67) and Nevada (77-67).  They were also ahead of UCLA in Pauley Pavilion nearly the entire game before falling to the Bruins 81-75.  The following year, The Broncos captured the Big West East Division Championship with a 12-4 league mark.  Boise State was 21-8 overall, including a win at Loyola Marymount, an upset in the Pavilion over #17 Washington (69-61)and sweeps of Nevada (77-52 and 60-48) and West Division Champion New Mexico State (67-48 and 70-48).  The Broncos disposed of Cal State-Fullerton (77-50) and Long Beach State (71-58) in the Big West Tournament before losing to New Mexico State 79-69.

 

From there, Boise State slid downhill to 12-15 the following year, 6-10 in the Big West.  The Broncos failed to qualify for the conference tournament.  In Hordemann's senior year, Boise State went 17-14 and 8-8.  They pounded Gonzaga 94-69 during the season among their non-conference victims.  Boise State whipped Long Beach State 95-70 in the league tournament but lost to Utah State to end their season.

 

 

 

Frank Jackson (1983-1985)

 

Jackson was Bobby Dye's first floor leader. He understood what Dye was trying to teach at Boise State—strong aggressive defense, good passing and taking intelligent shots. 

 

Jackson is 3rd all-time in season assists with 135 in 1984-1985, second only to Doug Usitalo and Steve Connor, who each had 145.   

 

Jackson paced the Broncos in scoring his senior year with 388 points for a 13.4 average.  In his junior year, he led the team in field goal percentage, hitting 122 of 231 shots for an impressive 52.8%.  He joins Terry Lee, Joe Wyatt, Roberto Bergersen, Booker Nabors and Bryan Defares as the only guards in Bronco history to lead their team in that department.  Of that group, only Bergersen (51.4%) and Lee (50.2%) were over 50 percent, making Jackson's intelligent shooting all the more impressive.  He also led the team in assists both years with 135 his senior year and 106 in his junior season.  His 4.7 assists per game in 1984-1985 ranks fifth all-time. 

 

Although 1983-1984 was Dye's first season, Jackson was instrumental in carrying out his philosophy.  The team held opponents to 1,734 points (5th in Bronco history) for just a 61.9 point scoring average (4th).  Dye painstakingly stressed fundamentals and boxing out was just one of them.  Jackson and the Broncos held opponents to just 854 rebounds and a 30.5 rebounding average, which rank 2nd and 3rd in the Bronco record books.  And, he stressed taking care of the basketball, which Jackson excelled at in leading Boise State to an all-time record of allowing just 147 steals by opponents the entire year.

 

When Frank Jackson came in, Boise State had suffered seven consecutive losing seasons and 11 of their previous 12.  Under the tutelage of Dye, he led the team to a 15-13 record, a five-game improvement over the year before.  They were also 16-13 his senior year.  More important, the wins were larger and the losses were closer.  Boise State downed Gonzaga, Wyoming, Fresno State and Montana in Jackson's first year and Wyoming the following year.  Plus, in the Big Sky Tournament, Boise State shocked Larry Krystkowiak and Montana 67-54 before losing to Nevada in the semifinals.

 

 

 

Coby Karl (2002-2007)

Bronco record for games (127) and second in career starts (111).  When Bronco fans first saw #5 in action, it was apparent that he was something special.  Here was a 6-5 guard that could slash to the basket, go up for a dunk with authority, rebound, block shots, and rain down three-pointers with regularity. 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketKarl is second only to Bronco great Steve Connor in career assists with 502.  He scored 1,698 points in his four-year career, good for third all-time.  Karl holds the Boise State record for three-point attempts with 717.  Coby is also ranked second in free throws (432), free-throw attempts (549) and three-pointers (246), fourth in field goals attempted (1,181), sixth in field goals (500),  eighth in free-throw percentage (78.69%), 10th in Bronco history in rebounds (507) and 11th in blocked shots.  With the increased number of regular-season games, Karl holds the all-time record for games played and is tied with Jason Ellis for 2nd in games started with 111.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketIn his career, he hit 500 of 1181 field goal attempts (42.3%), 266 of 717 three-point attempts (37.1%) and a remarkable 432 of 549 free throw attempts, for 78.7%.  Karl averaged 13.4 points and 4 rebounds per game throughout his great Bronco career, and had 114 steals and 59 blocked shots. 

 Karl became the third Bronco ever to score 400 points in a season three times, joining Chris Childs and Steve Connor. He is ranked into 10th all-time in rebounds, the only guard to rank in the top ten in that category.  He passed legend Chris Childs (392) for second in the Bronco record books in assists with 408.  Coby finished his illustrious career with 59 blocked shots, one behind Richard Morgan and Billy Fikes to rank 12th all-time.  Again, Karl would be the only guard to rank in the top ten (or anywhere near it, for that matter).  Coby broke Joe Skiffer's all-time record of 125 games, finishing with 127.  

 He recently became only the second Bronco (Abe Jackson is the other) to rank in the top ten for season 3-pointers in three years. Karl's best season of 80 three-pointers last season ranks third behind only Abe Jackson at Boise State. span style='mso-spacerun:yes'>  He is second to Tanoka Beard on the all-time list at Boise State with 432 free throws and 549 free-throw attempts.  Coby is now 4th all-time in field goals attempted (1211) behind Steve Connor, Abe Jackson and Chris Childs) and eighth in field goals (432).    

Karl finished with 114 career steals, just missing the top ten in that department.  Regardless, Coby is the only player in Bronco basketball history to rank in the top ten in three major categories (scoring, rebounding, assists, blocked shots and steals).  And as pointed out, he nearly made the career top ten in every one of those.

Karl's average of 17.2 points per game in his junior year is tied as the 16th best season in Bronco history while his 129 free throws that year are tied for 7th.  Most impressive, however, is his 83.45% free-throw percentage (116-139) his senior season at Boise State.  Karl is 3rd all-time for the most three-pointers in a season with 80, which he canned during his senior year.  He is also 7th (70) and 8th (67) in treys in his sophomore and junior years, respectively.  Coby is 2nd all-time for three-point attempts (216) his senior season and ranks 5th (181) and 7th (177) in the same category for his sophomore and junior seasons, respectively.  Coby is also in the record book for season assists (129 in his sophomore year--5th, 125 in his senior year—8th and 117 his junior year—tied for 12th), free throws (10th with 129 his junior year) and free throw attempts in a season (11th with 162 in 2005-06).

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketCoby and his Bronco teammates threw up 649 three-pointers last year, an all-time Boise State record.  Their 220 treys also ranks second all-time.  They also grabbed 1,190 rebounds, good for third all-time as a team and their rebound average of 38.4 per game is fourth.  Coby and the Broncos also blocked 108 shots in 2006-07, fifth all-time.   

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketCoby was a team leader in nearly every category.  He led Boise State in scoring in each of his last two seasons, He led the team in free-throw percentage his last three years, one of only three Broncos to ever do that (Chris Childs and Abe Jackson are the others).  Karl also led his team in assists his last three years and is one of just two Bronco players to accomplish that—Gerry Washington also did it in his career.

 

Karl redshirted his first year, but was a big contributor in 2003-04, the team's best during his four years. They finished 23-10 overall with a 12-6 WAC record.  It was not a tough non-conference schedule, but they did defeat Oregon State 82-80 on the road.  They also had an impressive win over Nevada 79-75 to split with the Wolf Pack and downed eventual conference champion UTEP twice during the season.  However, the Broncos lost to the Miners in the league tournament 85-73 to douse their hopes of an NCAA berth.  Boise State did reach the "Sweet Sixteen" of the NIT, throttling UNLV 84-69 and defeating Wisconsin-Milwaukee 73-70 before falling to Marquette 66-53.

 

There was considerable optimism going into the next year, but the Broncos ended the season 16-18 overall and 6-12 in the WAC.  Boise State did show what they were capable of when they ran through Tulsa, #24 Nevada and Fresno State at the league tournament in Reno before losing 91-78 in the WAC Championship to UTEP.

 

Spurred by the Broncos' strong performance in the league tournament in 2005, hopes were again high heading into the 2005-06 season.  But the team could not parlay that post-season success into improvement, with Boise State going 14-15 overall and 6-10 in league. 

 

 

In 2006-07, the Broncos finished 17-14 with an even 8-8 league mark.  They lost 65-63 to a Washington State team that would be ranked as high as #10 although they were not ranked at the time.  Boise State also took #9 Nevada to the wire in Reno before falling 90-86 and defeated Albany, an NCAA Tournament team.  Karl and the Broncos made some noise in the league tournament by defeating #3 seed Fresno State but were clobbered by New Mexico State 88-69. 

Karl, despite his gaudy individual numbers, was not recognized by the WAC until his junior season, when he was named to the All-WAC Second Team. He finally made the All-WAC team his senior year.

 

 

 

Brian King (1987-1990)

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketA transfer from Oregon State, King was the consummate three-point specialist.  He was a pure outside shooter, holding the all-time record for career three-point percentage with an amazing 45.3% (120-265).  King ranks 8th in three-pointers with 120 and 12th in attempts with 265. 

 

 King holds the all-time record for three-point percentage in a season with an incredible 52.2% (36-69) his sophomore season.  King is also 5th and 10th in that important shooting category, hitting 44.6% in 1988-89 and 42% his senior year.   

 

He led the Broncos in three-point shooting each of his last two seasons.  King also led his team in steals in his senior year with 37.  King and the Bronco 1987-88 team continue to hold the all-time record for field goal percentage with 52.4%.  It is no accident that King also happened to be on the 1988-89 team that ranks fifth in that category with a 49.6 percentage.  His value to the Broncos is further evidenced by the fact that his Boise State teams are ranked 1st (44.7%), 2nd (44.1%) and 5th (38.0%) in three-point shooting for the three years that Brian King played.  Boise State's 1987-88 team limited opponents to 56.3 points a game, the all-time record due in no small part to King's defense.  Brian's 1988-89 team ranks second all-time in scoring defense with opponents hitting an average of 58.9 points.

 

 In his junior season, King and Boise State hit 71.9% of their free throws, 3rd best all-time.  They also rank second in allowing the fewest steals by the opposition (just 158), third in allowing the fewest field goals (576) and fourth in fewest field goal attempts (1,287).  In his sophomore year, the Broncos had 308 steals, second in school history.  They hold the record for allowing opponents just 29.1 rebounds per game and also rank 4th all-time in allowing the fewest field goals (580) and in allowing just 231 three-pointers.  In King's senior year, Boise State allowed 588 field goals by the opposition, 5th all-time and a paltry 31.5% three-point shooting, also 5th in the Bronco record books.  

 

In his sophomore season, Boise State enjoyed the best season in school history (24-6, 13-3 in the Big Sky).  Coach Bobby Dye's Broncos defeated St. Mary's twice and blasted Gonzaga 89-59.  Three of those six losses were heartbreakers to Top 10 teams—two to Wyoming (59-55 and 56-50 and then to Michigan (63-58) in the NCAA Tournament.  Boise State just missed a three-pointer with seconds left that would have tied the Wolverines, the same Michigan team that went on to win the National Championship the following year.  The lineup that played King and the Broncos featured no less than seven players that would go on to the NBA.  Boise State beat its opponents by an average of 13.4 points per game. 

 

Boise State followed that magical year with a 23-7 mark and another 13-3 league campaign that won the regular season.  Included were wins over Gonzaga, Gary Payton and nationally-ranked Oregon State (53-43), San Jose State, Wisconsin-Green Baby, and Pepperdine.  A disappointing tournament loss to Idaho State sent the Broncos to the NIT, however, where they lost to Oklahoma State.  In King's senior season, the Broncos could not overcome the loss of Chris Childs and fell to 12-15.  Boise State did score wins over St. Mary's, Gonzaga and San Jose State.

 

Overshadowed somewhat by legendary guards Chris Childs and Doug Usitalo, King received due recognition in 1990 as an All-Big Sky first team selection. 

 

 

 

Eric Lane (2003-2007)

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketLane finished his career as the 14th leading scorer in school history (1,076 points).  He was 3rd in three-pointers with 199, 3rd with 165 three-point attempts, 8th in field goal tries with 962 and 10th all-time in assists with 246. 

 

Eric is tied for 10th in three-pointers in a season with 60 in 2005-06; he also is tied for 13th with 58 made in 2004-05.  Lane also is in the record books for three different seasons in three-point attempts:  9th (167 in his junior year), 10th (163 his senior year) and 11th (162 his sophomore year).

 

Eric and the Broncos threw up 649 three-pointers last year, an all-time Boise State record.  Their 220 treys also ranks second all-time.  They also grabbed 1,190 rebounds, good for third all-time as a team and their rebound average of 38.4 per game is fourth.  Lane also helped the Broncos block 108 shots in 2006-07, fifth all-time.   

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketEric's first season with the Broncos (2003-04) was the team's most successful.  They finished 23-10 overall with a 12-6 WAC record.  It was not a tough non-conference schedule, but they did defeat Oregon State 82-80 on the road.  They also had an impressive win over Nevada 79-75 to split with the Wolf Pack and downed eventual conference champion UTEP twice during the season.  However, the Broncos lost to the Miners in the league tournament 85-73 to douse their hopes of an NCAA berth.  Boise State did reach the "Sweet Sixteen" of the NIT, throttling UNLV 84-69 and defeating Wisconsin-Milwaukee 73-70 before falling to Marquette 66-53.

 

There were high hopes that the team could continue to momentum the following year, but the Broncos ended the season 16-18 overall and 6-12 in the WAC.  8th-seeded Boise State did show what they were capable of when they ran through Tulsa, #24 Nevada and Fresno State at the league tournament in Reno before losing 91-78 in the WAC Championship to UTEP.

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketSpurred by the Broncos' strong performance in the league tournament in 2005, optimism was again high heading into the 2005-06 season.  But the team could not parlay that post-season success into improvement, with Boise State going 14-15 overall and 6-10 in league.  

 

In 2006-07, the Broncos finished 17-14 with an even 8-8 league mark.  They lost 65-63 to a Washington State team that would be ranked as high as #10 although they were not ranked at the time.  Boise State also took #9 Nevada to the wire in Reno before falling 90-86 and defeated Albany, an NCAA Tournament team.  Lane and the Broncos upset #3 seed Fresno State but were clobbered by New Mexico State 88-69. 

Lane's defensive prowness was awarded when the WAC honored him on the All-WAC Defensive Team in 2007.

 

 

 

Terry Lee (1981-1982)

 

Lee was money from the free-throw line.  In 1981-82, he hit 71-80 free throws for 88.8%, second only to Lance Vaughn in Bronco history. 

 

Lee led Boise State in scoring in 1981-82 with a 13.3 average, field goal percentage with 50.2%, steals with 36 and of course free-throw shooting with 88.8%.   

 

Boise State was 11-15 in Lee's only season, 6-8 in the Big Sky.  That not only was the last season in the old Bronco Gym (capacity—3,500) but the last fans would see of Terry Lee, who left the team to pursue a professional baseball career. 

 

 

 

Terry Miller (1974-1976)

 

Miller is 10th in the history of Boise State basketball with 243 career assists in just two seasons. 

 

Miller ranks 7h in assists in a season with 127 in the '75-76 year.

 

Miller led the Broncos in assists in his senior season with a 5.1 average.  That's tied for the third best per-game average in school history.  Only Freddie Williams (5.8) and Steve Connor (5.6) are ahead of him. 

 

Miller's junior season, Boise State averaged 82 points a game, second in the record books.  Miller and the Broncos followed that up the next season with 79.1 points a game, which ranks fourth.  In Miller's senior year, he helped set an all-time record when the Broncos made 559 free throws.  That team also holds the all-time team assists record with 540 and ranks second for free-throw percentage (72.8%) and third in free throw attempts with 768.  The 1974-75 Boise State team pulled down 1,120 rebounds, fourth all-time and they continue to rank second all-time with a 43.1 rebounds per game average.  

 

In 1974, Miller and the Broncos were an even 13-13 and 7-7 in the Big Sky.  They split with Utah State and lost to Washington.  The following year, Miller was a big contributor on the Big Sky Champion Broncos, as they put together an 18-11 season, 11-5 in the Big Sky.  An overtime loss to Fresno State, a five-point loss to Kansas and defeats at the hands of Oregon, Arkansas and UNLV in the NCAA Tournament represented five of the 11 losses.

 

 

 

Booker Nabors (2000-2004)

 

Nabors ranks 8th in Boise State history in career assists with 249.  Booker is also17th with 1,025 points, 8th in three-point field goal attempts with 332 and 11th with 902 field goal attempts.

 

Nabors enjoyed the eighth best season in school history shooting three-pointers, when he connected on 44% of his tries (40-91) in 2003-2004. 

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketNabors and the Broncos struggled through his first three seasons, going 17-14, 13-17 and 13-16.  The taste of success in his senior year was all the more sweet, as Boise State finished 23-10, 12-6 in the Western Athletic Conference.  The Broncos beat Oregon State and UTEP and swept UTEP in the regular season, only to lose to the Miners 85-73 in the WAC Tournament.  The Broncos played in the National Invitation Tournament, destroying UNLV 84-69 and beating Wisconsin-Milwaukee 73-70 before bowing out in the Sweet 16 of the NIT to Marquette 66-53.

 

 

 

Renee Ruth

 

  Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketThe 1968-69 team set an incredible record of 1,545 rebounds, one that may never be broken.  They also are fourth all-time with 2,249 points and set school records by averaging 83.3 points per game and 956 field goals and 2,146 attempts.  The Broncos held opponents to 38.8% shooting, another all-time record.   

 

The Broncos finished with a sparkling 26-9 record in 1966-67, winning the Intermountain Conference and earning a spot in the NJCAA national tournament.  Boise State downed Eastern Utah in two out of three games to advance to the regionals, where they beat a Nate Archibald-led Western Arizona 89-86 and TVCC 83-61.  The Broncos advanced to Hutchinson, Kansas, defeating Dodge City, Kansas 91-77 before losing to Moberly, Missouri 70-50 and Powell, Wyoming 84-71.  BJC finished the year ninth in the country.

 

The amazing Broncos proved that year was no fluke.  The following season, they lost just three times in the regular season.  Coach Murray Satterfield's squad powered through the ICAC and again advanced to Hutchinson.  Ruth and the Broncos beat College of Southern Idaho and TVCC in regionals to earn a spot in the national tournament once again.  BJC did not shoot well in losing the opener to Miami Dade 62-55.  A 66-64 win over St. Louis Baptist was followed by a season-ending loss to Iowa Central 85-68.  The Broncos finished the junior college era with a 26-5 record, 10th in the country. 

 

In their first action as a four-year school, Ruth and Boise State stumbled out of the blocks with a 3-6 record.  They then proceeded to win 15 games in a row to finish at 18-6.  The Broncos downed Southern Oregon 101-70 in the district playoffs, but ended the season with two consecutive losses to nationally-ranked Linfield, 90-81 and 83-80 in overtime.

 

The Broncos compiled their third 20-win season in Ruth's four years in 1969-70.  Boise State finished 20-8 with one of those losses to New Mexico State, the #5 team in the country.  The Broncos played in the NCAA small college tournament, losing the opener against UC-Riverside 83-71 but then rebounding for a 63-61 win over Puget Sound to take third place.

 

Playing with Bill Otey, Keith Burke and Wendell Hart, Ruth and the Broncos were 91-29 in their career, the best four-year record in school history.  Recruited as junior college players, they nonetheless remained in Boise to aid the transition to a four-year program.

 

 

 

Jeff Sanor (1990-1991)

 

After playing three seasons for the University of Washington, Boise High School's Jeff Sanor elected to return to his home town to play for the Broncos. 

 

In 1990-91, Sanor scored over 400 points, the 26th Bronco player to do that.

 

In his only season playing for the Broncos, Jeff led the team in free-throw shooting, hitting 78% (92-118), steals with 43 and in assists with 100.  Following the season, he was honored with the Jeff Foster Memorial Award, given annually to the player who is instrumental to success in the program both on and off the floor.

 

Boise State returned to its winning ways in 1990-91 with Jeff Sanor being a big difference.  The year before, injuries and other problems resulted in a 12-15 season but the addition of Sanor led to an 18-11 record, 10-6 in the Big Sky.  The Broncos beat Gonzaga, Utah State and Pepperdine out of conference.  They lost a tough game in the Big Sky Tournament to Idaho State, but were selected to play in the NIT.  Their 75-74 loss to Southern Illinois in the Pavilion, a game in which they led all but the final 10 seconds, is still one of the more disappointing post-season losses in Bronco history. 

 

 

 

Steve Shephard (1993-1997)

 

When Shephard came to Boise State, his potential was unlimited.  He was a steady ball handler and a great shooter and penetrator.  Injuries throughout his career limited him, but he still finished with impressive statistics.

 

In Shephard's freshman year, the Broncos made 848 field goals, fourth all-time at Boise State.  In his sophomore year, the Broncos allowed just 31% three-point shooting by opponents, tied for third in that category and just 161 steals by the opposition (3rd).  In his senior year, Shephard helped the Broncos make 223 three-pointers, still the school record.  Shephard's junior team is fifth in that category with 198.    That team also ranks fourth for three-point attempts (570), while his senior team is third with 613.  In 1993-94, Shephard and the Broncos set the school record for blocked shots with 143, dished out 520 assists (#2 in the Bronco record books), hauled down 1,099 rebounds, fifth all-time and got 267 steals, also 5th all-time.  They also allowed the fewest points (1,678) and field goals (566) in Boise State history and own the fifth best scoring average-defense with just 62.1 points per game allowed.  

 

Shephard led the Broncos with 102 assists in 1993-94.   

 

Boise State was over .500 in all four of Steve's seasons.  In his freshman year, the Broncos were 17-13 and 7-7 in the Big Sky but surprise winners of the league tournament.  Included in the schedule was an impressive win over Cleveland State and a narrow win over St. Mary's.  Then, the Broncos swept through Montana State, Weber State and Idaho State to take the tournament title.  They earned the right to play powerful Louisville in the NCAA Tournament, a game in which they fell behind by over 20 points, only to rally at the end.  The Broncos eventually fell 67-58. 

 

The following year, Boise State was 17-10 overall and 7-7 in the Big Sky.  The Broncos defeated Utah State, St. Mary's Nevada, Pepperdine, San Jose State, Bucknell, Rice and Davidson in the non-conference season, compiling a 10-2 record outside the Big Sky.  The season ended when they were upset by Idaho State in the league tournament.

 

In 1995, Bobby Dye left and new coach Rod Jensen took over.  The Broncos were competitive but only managed a 15-13 season, 10-4 in the Big Sky.  They did defeat Pepperdine on the road, but lost to Gonzaga, Oregon, Princeton, BYU and Maine.  In Shephard's senior year, Boise State was 14-13 overall and 9-7 in their first season in the Big West Conference.  Boise State defeated Gonzaga, BYU and Pepperdine, but suffered narrow losses to Washington State (74-69), Idaho State (75-70), Weber State (84-80), St. Mary's (58-57) and Oregon (61-58).  Boise State was humbled in the Big West Tournament by cellar dweller Pacific 68-52.

 

Shephard was chosen as the Big Sky Conference Freshman of the Year on 1994.

 

 

 

  Joe Skiffer (1999-2004)

 

Joe is 5th all-time in Bronco assists with 343.  Skiffer also ranks 3rd all-time in games played with 125. 

In 2003-04, the Broncos set a record for points scored (2,431) but because of the increased games on the schedule, their scoring average does not appear in the top five.  One impressive record that Skiffer and the Broncos do hold from that year is free-throw percentage, as they hit 73.8% his senior year.    The 2003-04 team also ranks third in field goal defense, allowing opponents just 43.2% shooting.  .  Led by the dependable Skiffer, the Broncos took care of the ball, allowing just 180 steals to rank fifth.  That team's three-point attempts (639—1st), three-pointers made (221—2nd) rebounds (1,136—2nd), field goals (852—3rd) and field goal attempts (1,904—3rd) are all ranked in the Bronco record book.   In Skiffer's junior year, the Broncos allowed 43% shooting by the opposition to rank second all-time.

 

In his junior year at Boise State, Joe led the Broncos in both assists (92) and steals (33).

 

Boise State was 17-14 and 8-8 in the Big West in Skiffer's freshman year.  They lost a tough game to Cincinnati 73-61 and were destroyed on the road by Kansas.  Coach Rod Jensen's team was able to beat Long Beach State 95-70 but was upended by Utah State 67-48.  The Broncos struggled in Joe's sophomore season with a record of 13-17 and a 6-12 mark in their first season in the WAC.  Boise State did score nice wins over Wyoming and Northern Arizona and shocked UTEP in the first round of the conference tournament before bowing out to Tulsa.

 

In 2002-03, the Broncos were 13-16 under first-year coach Greg Graham, with a 7-11 record in the WAC.  Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketSkiffer helped the Broncos to a 23-10 record the following year, with a 12-6 league mark.  Boise State defeated Oregon State on the road 82-80 and scored a double-header sweep of UTEP in the regular season before losing to the Miners in the WAC Tournament.  Boise State was invited to the NIT, where they destroyed UNLV of the Mountain West Conference 84-59 and then downed Wisconsin-Milwaukee 73-70 to advance to the "Sweet Sixteen" of the tournament.  A weary Bronco team was out manned in a loss at Marquette 66-53 that ended their season. 

 

 

 

Craig Spjute (1984-1986)

 

Spjute was one of the early leaders for Coach Bobby Dye.  The three-point shot was implemented just prior to Spjute coming to Boise State from Ricks Junior College in Rexburg and it was made for players like Spjute.  His long-range bombs provided excitement for the Pavilion crowds, and opposing teams could never rest, not knowing when Spjute would cast off for a trey.  Many players attempt a host of three-point shots; Spjute made them.

 

Craig still ranks fifth all-time in career three-point field goal percentage, with the sharpshooter nailing 45-110 for 40.9%.  He is behind only Brian King, Wilson Foster, Chris Childs and Shambric Williams in three-point accuracy.

 

Boise State was 16-13 in Spjute's first season, with a 5-9 record in the Big Sky.  The Broncos defeated Wyoming but lost handily to Oregon State and Washington.  Spjute and Boise State surprised Montana 67-54 in the first round of the Big Sky Tournament but lost to the aggressive Nevada Wolf Pack 79-67.  The following year was a rebuilding project for the Broncos, and they slipped to 12-16 overall, 6-8 in the Big Sky.

 

 

 

Doug Usitalo

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketDoug Usitalo could very well have been called "Usea-steal-o" for his defensive prowess.  There has never been player who could pick someone's pocket as cleanly and as instantly in 38 years of Bronco basketball at the four-year level.  Nor has there been a better passer than Doug.  Usitalo would consistently steal someone blind at midcourt and either race down the court for an easy layup or fire a sure pass to backcourt mate Chris Childs for the two points.  His passes from his point guard position to open teammates were objects of beauty.  No-look feeds, perfect 15-foot bounce passes, alley oops for thundering slam dunks—Usitalo did it all at Boise State.  He was the consummate unselfish team player and a hard-nosed competitor who drew the opposing team's shooting guard on defense.  Bronco fans who saw him should consider themselves very fortunate.

 

Despite playing only two years, Usitalo accumulated 275 assists.  His assists per year average of 137.5 is a Bronco record, beating #2 Steve Connor by 12 assists per year.  Usitalo's amazing two-year steals total of 185 was beaten only by four-starter and NBA star Chris Childs, who totaled 215.

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketThe popular point guard holds down both #1 and #2 for the most steals in a season, getting an eye-popping 105 his first season under Coach Bobby Dye before getting 80 the following year.  The 105 steals by Usitalo remains not only as the runaway Bronco record but placed him second in the nation that year.  The next best steals mark is 72 by Rawn Hayes.  Usitalo is tied with Steve Connor for the most assists in a season at Boise State with 145, which he accomplished his senior season.  The year before, Usitalo dished out 130 to rank fifth all-time.

 

Usitalo and the Broncos enjoyed what are to this date the glory years of Boise State basketball.  They set an all-time record for wins in a season with 24 in his senior year, and are 4th all-time with 22 wins during his junior season.  The winning percentage of 82.8% in 1987-88 also is a Bronco record.  In Usitalo's junior year, the Broncos had a phenomenal 344 steals to lead the nation.  The '86-87 Broncos also hold the school record for field goal percentage with a sizzling 52.4%.  Make no mistake—this is due to the thread-the-needle passes of Usitalo for easy buckets.  The following year, the team hit 49.7%, which is ranked fourth all-time.  Boise State's 1986-87 team is ranked second in free throws attempted (792), second in three-pointers allowed (68), second in three-point attempts allowed (212), third in free throws made (544), fourth in three-point percentage (39.1%), and sixth with 2,196 points.    Usitalo's 1987-88 team holds the all-time records for scoring defense, when they held the opposition to a paltry 56.3 points a game and ranked in the top ten nationally.  They also hold the records for three-point percentage (44.7%) and rebound average allowed (29.1) and rank second in steals with 208, fourth in three-pointers allowed (75), fourth in three-point attempts (231) and are fourth in field goals allowed (580).  None of this would have been possible without Usitalo; it is very difficult to shoot over 50 percent from the field, hit nearly 45% from three-point land and conduct a virtual parade to the free-throw line without a good passer.  And he personified Rod Jensen's aggressive in-your-face defensive style. 

 

Usitalo led the Broncos both years in assists and steals.

 

He was named second-team All-Big Sky in 1988.

 

In the1986-87 season, Boise State enjoyed its first 20-win season as a member of the NCAA. Ran off to a 16-1 start at one time were ranked #23 in the nation. 

 

88—first-ever appearance on ESPN with a record crowd of 12,422 on hand.

 

 

 

Lance Vaughn (1989-1993)

Vaughn was one of Boise State's best point guards, always looking to pass rather than shoot.  When defenses collapsed inside, he was quite capable of hitting the three-pointer, so he made them pay one way or another.

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketVaughn holds the all-time free-throw percentage record for a season.  In 1992-93, Vaughn calmly sank 62 of 67 free throws (92.5%).  He ranks 9th in Bronco history for career three-pointers attempted (320) and 12th in career three-pointers made with 109.    

 

He led the Broncos his senior season in assists with 84 and free-throw percentage and hit 49.5% of his three-point attempts his sophomore season to lead the team in that department.

 

Lance and the Broncos won 21 games his senior season, the fifth most in Boise State history.  They also hit 511 free throws out of 712 attempts, both good for 5th all-time.  In his sophomore season, the team was deadly from the field, hitting 50.5% of their shots to rank third all-time.  In 1989-90, the Broncos allowed just 1,683 points, the fourth lowest total by a Bronco team.  That team set a record for the fewest field goals attempted by the opposition (1,222) and only 588 of those were successful, which ranks 5th in the Bronco record books.  In three of Vaughn's four years, the Broncos were highly successful at limiting the three-pointer, and that is directly attributable to Vaughn's perimeter defense.  In 1989, they allowed just 80 three-pointers and 31.5% shooting (both 5th all-time).  In 1990, Boise State allowed just 224 attempts (3rd).  In '91, they allowed just 70 three-point shots (3rd), 233 attempts (5th) and set a record in limiting opposing players to an even 30 percent from beyond the arc.  In Lance's senior year, Boise State set records in allowing just 60 three-pointers and 195 attempts and the 30.8% shooting was second only to the team the year before.

 

While the Broncos were 12-15 overall and 7-9 in the Big Sky in Vaughn's first year at Boise State, they quickly improved to 18-11 the following campaign.  Wins over Gonzaga, Utah State and Pepperdine plus a 10-6 run through the Big Sky season were a significant improvement.  Boise State hosted Southern Illinois in the NIT, but lost the game in the final 10 seconds 75-74. 

 

The following year, the Broncos slipped a bit to 16-13 but defeated Air Force, San Jose State and St. Mary's.  Vaughn and the Broncos surged to 21-8 the following year, with a sparkling 10-4 Big Sky mark.  They lost narrow games on the road to Washington and Pepperdine and one at home to Pepperdine but pounded Wyoming by 20.  The Broncos won the Big Sky Tournament and met Vanderbilt in the NCAA Tournament.  Vandy's uncanny three-point shooting was too much for the Broncos and they lost handily.

 

  

 

Gerry Washington (1995-1999)

 

Washington is #3 all-time in career steals with 179.  He is 8th in career points with 1,210—he averaged 10.7 as a four-year starter.  Gerry also ranks 4th in assists with 347, 4th in three-pointers with 184, 4th in three-point attempts (480), 6th in free throws with 322, 7th in free-throw attempts (410), 9th in free-throw percentage (78.5%), 9th in three-point percentage (38.3%) and is 12th in field goal attempts with 887. 

 

Gerry also is honored in the Boise State record book as #6 in Bronco history for three-pointers in a season (63) and three-point attempts (157) and 9th in three-point percentage (43.2%) in his senior year and 9th in steals (55) his sophomore year.

 

Washington's impact was felt immediately, giving the Broncos a trio of long-range threats they hadn't had since the days of Chris Childs, Brian King and Wilson Foster.  Washington teamed with Joe Wyatt and Mike Tolman to help Boise State hit 223 shots from behind the arc in 1996-97, an all-time Bronco record.  In Washington's first year, the team hit 198 treys, which ranks 5th and in his junior year, the Broncos made 221, which is tied for second.  Thus, three of the top five achievements in that category were made during Gerry Washington's career at Boise State.  Further, his tight defense helped his team set records in 1996-1997 for allowing the fewest points (1,678) and fewest field goals allowed (566).  They also ranked 2nd for fewest field goal attempts allowed (1,236) and 5th for scoring average allowed (62.1).  Washington and the Broncos also rank 3rd in scoring average-defense (61.7) for his senior year.    

 

To say that Gerry Washington was a leader is putting it mildly.  His leadership, both on and off the floor, was outstanding and it goes far beyond statistics.  Gerry led the team in assists in each of his last three seasons, the only player in the history of Boise State to do so.  The steady Washington averaged 3.1 assists his sophomore year, 3.3 the next season and 3.5 in his senior year.  He led his team in free-throw shooting in both his freshman and sophomore seasons, sinking 79.7% his first year and 78% the following season.  Washington led the Broncos in three-point shooting, hitting 43.2% his sophomore year and 40.1% his senior year.  As noted above, Gerry also led the Broncos in steals his sophomore year.

 

In Washington's freshman season, Boise State was a couple of steps above .500 at 15-13, and compiled a 10-4 mark in their final year in the Big Sky.  They defeated Pepperdine and Nevada, but suffered tough losses to BYU, Princeton, Oregon and Gonzaga.  The Broncos were eliminated in the semifinals of the Big Sky Tournament.  The following year, Boise State entered the Big West and found the going rough with a 14-13 overall record and 9-7 in conference.  Boise State defeated Gonzaga, BYU and Pepperdine out of conference but lost close games to Oregon, St. Mary's, Weber State and Washington State.  In the Big West Tournament, Boise State was shocked by Pacific 68-52.

 

In Gerry's junior season, Boise State showed a bit of improvement with a 17-13 overall record, but were again 9-7 in league.  They were again upset by a lower tier team in the Big West Tournament, this time losing to Cal State-Fullerton 89-82.  Washington helped take the Broncos to new heights his senior year, however, capturing the East Division Championship of the Big West.  Boise State was 21-8 overall and 12-4 in conference.  Highlighting the year was a thrilling 69-61 upset of 17th-ranked Washington in the Pavilion.  The schedule had been upgraded, with Boise State losing to Indiana, Weber State and Gonzaga.  Two wins in the Big West Tournament landed Boise State in the conference final on ESPN against New Mexico State, a team they had defeated twice in the season.  The Aggies exacted revenge that night, defeating the Broncos 79-69. 

 

In 1996, Washington was selected as the Big Sky Conference Freshman of the Year.  By the time he graduated, Boise State had moved into the Big West Conference, but he had the respect of that league as well when he was named to the All-Big West team.  Washington was also selected as the winner of the Jeff Foster Memorial Award in 1999.

 

 

 

C.J. Williams (1998-2003)

 

C.J. is tied for 8th all-time in career assists with 249. 

 

Williams led the Broncos in three-point percentage his senior year, connecting on 49 of 155 long-range tries for 31.6%.  He is 10th all-time for those 155 attempts.  C.J. paced the team in assists his freshman year with 3.2 per game. 

 

In 2000-2001, C.J. and the Broncos scored 2,237 points, fifth all-time.  They made 174 three-pointers out of 531 attempts, both rank sixth in the Boise State record book.  In C.J.'s freshman year, the Broncos allowed just 1,679 points, the second lowest total ever.  That included just 569 field goals (2nd) and 1,278 field goal attempts (3rd).  By his senior year, the Bronco defense had developed into a stingy group, allowing just 43% shooting by the opposition. 

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketIn C.J.'s four years, Boise State was 12-15 in 1999-2000, 17-14 the following year, 13-17 in 2001-2002 and 13-16 in his senior year.  The last two years included games in the Western Athletic Conference, which the Broncos joined in 2001.  In their first WAC Tournament, the Broncos surprised UTEP 73-72 in overtime but lost to favored Tulsa 72-53.  Greg Graham had taken over prior to C.J.'s senior year, and Boise State was bounced in the first round of the tournament by SMU 65-58.

 

 

 

Freddie Williams (1977-1979)

 

His biggest asset he brought to the program was that he was ice from the charity stripe.  In his two years, Freddie sank 80.41% (115-143) of his shots.  Williams is 3rd all-time for that lofty percentage. 

 

Freddie's best year of free-throw shooting was his senior year, when he made 89 of 107 for 83.2%, which is 6th all-time.  His playmaking was superb, hitting open teammates with regularity.  Williams is the school record holder with 5.8 assists per game that year.

 

Williams' great leadership on the court helped the Broncos hit 51.2% as a team his senior year, the second highest percentage in school history.  In his junior year, the Broncos dished out 489 assists as a team, the third highest total ever.

 

 

In addition to leading the team in free-throw shooting and assists, he also led the Broncos in steals with 22. 

 

The Broncos were 13-14 overall and 8-6 in the Big Sky in Freddie's first year and 11-15, 6-8 in his senior season.  He helped the team to nice wins over Oregon State and TCU in 1997-1978.

 

 

 

Darnell Woods (1992-1995)

 

Woods led the 1992-93 Broncos with 56 steals, which tied Chris Childs for seventh all-time.  He is also ninth in school history with 78.4 percent career shooting (178-227) from the free-throw line.  In 1994-95, Woods led the team by shooting 96 of 120 from the charity stripe for 80 percent and also led the Broncos with 95 assists and tied with Damon Archibald with 59 steals.   

 

The 1992-93 Broncos hold defensive records by limiting opponents to 60 three-point field goals and 195 three-point attempts, are rank second in opposition three-point percentage with 30.8%.  Woods and the Broncos are also fifth all-time with 21 wins, free throws with 511 and free throws attempted with 712. 

 

Woods and the Broncos rank third all-time for their 1993-94 season in holding onto the ball, allowing just 161 steals.  They also rank fourth with 848 field goals and meanwhile held opponents to 43.6% shooting, fifth all-time.    

 

In Darnell's senior season, the Broncos again were expert in defending the three-point line, holding opponents to 31 percent shooting, third all-time.     

 

Boise State won the Big Sky in two of Woods' three seasons, capturing the title his sophomore year in compiling a 21-8 record.  The Broncos lost to Vanderbilt in the NCAA Tournament.  The following year, Boise State was only 17-13 but was the unlikely winner of the league tournament after beating Montana State 75-57, Weber State 84-72 and Idaho State 85-81.  Boise State lost a close one to Louisville 67-58.  The Broncos finished Woods' senior year with a 17-10 record, including wins over Nevada and Pepperdine. 

 

 

 

Joe Wyatt (1995-1997)

 

Wyatt ranks 9th in Boise State history with 117 three-pointers in just two years.  He is 10th in attempts with 307. 

 

He made 60 three-pointers his senior year, tied with Roberto Bergersen for 8th on the Bronco list, and 9th with 156 attempts. 

 

Wyatt helped his team set an all-time record in 1996-1997 by hitting 223 three-point shots.  They also hold the mark for allowing just 1,678 points, with their opponents averaging just 62.1 points a game (5th).  That team is 1st in allowing just 566 field goals and 2nd in allowing 1,236 attempts.    

 

Wyatt led Boise State in scoring both seasons, scoring 325 his junior year for an 11.6 points per game average and then closing out with 384 points, a 16.0 point average.  He also led the team in field goal percentage his senior year with 46.9% shooting.    

 

In Joe's junior year, Boise State finished 15-13, and compiled a 10-4 mark in their final year in the Big Sky.  They defeated Pepperdine and Nevada, but suffered tough losses to BYU, Princeton, Oregon and Gonzaga.  The Broncos were eliminated in the semifinals of the Big Sky Tournament.  The following year, Boise State entered the Big West and found the going rough with a 14-13 overall record and 9-7 in conference.  Boise State defeated Gonzaga, BYU and Pepperdine out of conference but lost close games to Oregon, St. Mary's, Weber State and Washington State.  In the Big West Tournament, Boise State was shocked by Pacific 68-52.

 

Wyatt was honored as the winner of the Jeff Foster Memorial Award in 1997.

 


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