Smooth Shooters and Board Crashers

Two of the spots on Boise State's All-Time Basketball Team have been filled, going to guards Chris Childs and Roberto Bergersen. Now, we turn our attention to the big men. Two forwards will join Childs and Bergersen on the All-Time Team. Review the accomplishments of the great Bronco forwards over the years and be sure to vote on the Taco Bell Arena Board.

John Anderson (1977-1979)

 

John led Boise State in rebounding in the 1978-79 season, averaging 7.8 per game. 

 

In John's senior year, the Broncos shot 51.2%, 2nd all-time and one of only three years that the team finished above 50 percent.  He helped the Broncos average 37.5 rebounds per year that same season, good for sixth all-time.  In his junior year, Boise State dished out 489 assists as a team, which ranks third in the record books and in his sophomore year, they had 475 (tied for 5th). 

 

 

Ron Austin (1969-71)

 

Austin was one of the stars of the junior college team that stayed in Boise when the school was granted four-year status in 1968.  When the school was accepted as a four-year college, he continued at Boise State.  Ron's numbers prior to the official record book are similar to his last two seasons.    

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketAustin is the all-time Boise State leader in scoring average, hitting 24.5 points a game in the years 1970-71.    He was a pure talent, and could do it all, as his 8.73 rebounds per game average attest to.  Austin is ranked 8th in Boise Sate history in that department.  He is also ranked 3rd in field goals made in a season (221), 6th in field goals attempted in a season (441), 1st in free throws made in a season (194), 1st in season free throw attempts (247).  He is one of only two Broncos (Roberto Bergersen is the other) to score 600 points in one season.  In the two years that are counted in the Boise State record book, he scored 1067 points for a 20.5 average (1st).  Officially, Austin is 14th with the 1,067 points.  But considering his junior college years, Austin would be third behind only Tanoka Beard (1,944) and Steve Connor (1,927).   He is 12th in career field goals with 386.

 

 Ron holds the all-time Bronco record for points in a game, which he set in a battle with Montana February 13, 1971.  Austin torched the nets for 42 that night; he had scored 41 just 19 days earlier against Portland State.  He also hit for 38 a week later against Montana.

 

Austin led the Broncos in scoring in both 1969-70 (16.6) and 1970-1971 (24.5).  He hit 50.1% of his shots during the 70-71 season to lead the team.  His 78.5% free-throw percentage also led the Broncos.  Austin helped the Broncos average 83.3 points a game in the 1968-69 season, still the tops in Bronco history.  Boise State's 79.6 points a game the following year ranks 3rd.  That '68 Bronco team also holds records for field goals made, with an astounding (956), field goals attempted (2,146), rebounds (an incredible 1,545), rebound average (57.2) and field goal percentage defense—opponents shot just 38.8% against them.  Austin's 70-71 team is 4th in free throws made (526) and free throws attempted (746) and 5th in free throw percentage (71.8%).

 

Austin's Bronco teams were 26-5 in his freshman year, 19-8 in 1968-69, 20-8 his junior year and 10-16 in Boise State's first year in the Big Sky.  Boise State was invited to the NAIA National Tournament, where they blitzed Southern Oregon 101-70 before losing twice to Linfield.  Included in the 1968 season was a 93-75 win over Idaho State in Boise State's first year as a four-year school.  The following year, the Broncos blasted Pacific 94-67 and 99-52, downed Montana State 69-58, blew away Gonzaga 90-74, beat Montana 89-77 and defeated Idaho State again 98-88.  In Austin's senior season, Boise State downed Idaho 77-76, beat Idaho State 76-74, creamed Gonzaga by the same 90-74 score, beat Northern Arizona 82-65 and whipped Montana 98-74.  The 1970-71 Bronco team also holds the all-time school record for points in a game (118) when they outraced Portland State 118-96.  They also hold records for field goals attempted (90) vs. Montana and rebounds in a game (60) vs. Carroll College. 

 

Austin made the second-team in the Big Sky Conference in 1971.  He is one of only six Bronco basketball players in the Boise State Hall of Fame.   

 

 

 Eric Bailey (1980-1982 and 1983-84)

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketA smooth scorer, junior college transfer Bailey gave Coach Dave Leach the shooter and presence around the basket he desired.

 

Eric averaged 17.3 points in 1980-1981, the 15th best scoring season in Bronco history.  He made 188 field goals his senior year to rank ninth all-time out of 398 attempts, which is 10th in the record books.

 

In Bailey's sophomore year, the Broncos allowed just 57 blocked shots, tied for fifth in the record books, and 164 steals, which is fourth.

 

Bailey's 1981-82 team is known for handing out 480 assists, fourth in the history of Boise State basketball.  That same team also averaged 71.9% from the free-throw line, which is tied for the third best of all-time.

 

  In Eric's senior year, Boise State held opponents to 1,734 points, sixth all-time, and allowed just 61.9 points a game, fourth in the record books.  They only allowed 854 rebounds by their opponents, the second best performance ever and allowed an average of 30.5 rebounds per game, which is third.  They got good shots and protected the ball, allowing just 55 blocked shots all season long, which ranks third, and only 147 steals, an all-time record. 

 

Bailey led the Broncos in scoring in 1980-81 and paced the team with 41 steals. 

 

Boise State was 7-19 in Eric's first year.  They improved slightly to 11-15 the following season under Head Coach Dave Leach.  By the time Eric was a senior, the Broncos had switched directions with Bobby Dye taking the reins and the team was above .500 (15-13) for the first time in eight years.  Boise State downed nationally-ranked Fresno State 60-52 for their first victory over a Top 20 team and scored a nice win over Gonzaga (72-54) as well. 

 

 
Rich Blythe (1988-1991)

 

A role player who could leap to the heavens, Blythe led Boise State in rebounding in the 1989-90 season, averaging 5.5 rebounds per game.  Blythe also led Boise State in assists in 1989-90 with 2.3 per game.

 

Blythe's hustle and unselfish play were recognized by Coach Bobby Dye as the winner of the 1990 Jeff Foster Memorial Award.

 

Boise State won 23 games in Rich's sophomore year, tied for the second most ever.  That team could shoot the ball from anywhere on the floor.  Their field goal percentage was 49.6%, fifth best in school history, while the team shot 44.1% from three-point range, the second best season ever.  At the charity stripe, the team connected on 71.9% of their shots, tied for third best in the record books.  Coach Bobby Dye had the team playing complete basketball as the defense also excelled.  Boise State held opponents to 58.9 points a game, which ranks 2nd.  They allowed 576 field goals (3rd) and 1,287 attempts (4th).   The following year, the Bronco defense held opponents to 1,683 points, fourth best all-time and limited them to 588 field goals (5th) and just 1,222 shots to set an all-time record.    Blythe's leaping ability helped the team swat away 106 shots in his senior year, sixth best all-time. 

 

The Broncos won the Big Sky Conference regular season in Rich's sophomore year, going 13-3 in league and 23-7 overall.  The defeated Gonzaga 73-65 and nationally-ranked Oregon State (featuring Gary Payton) 53-43 and also scored nice wins over Wisconsin-Green Bay and Pepperdine.  A loss in the Big Sky Tournament sent Boise State to the NIT, where they lost on the road to Oklahoma State.  The Broncos fell to 12-15 the following year, but came back strong in Rich's senior year for an 18-11 season.  Once again, Boise State played in the NIT, but suffered a heartbreaking 75-74 loss at home to Southern Illinois.

 


Booker Brown (1970-1974)

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketBoise State had two of the most productive offensive attacks during Brown's time.  In his freshman year, the Broncos averaged 79.6 points a game, third all-time, and the following year, they hit at a 78.5 points per game clip (5th).  Boise State made 550 free throws in 1971-72 (2nd all-time) and 526 in 1970-71 (4th).  Those teams also appear in the record books for free-throw attempts; a record 797 in Booker's sophomore year and 746 the previous season. 

 

Brown also helped his sophomore team pull down 40 rebounds per game to rank third in school history, while the 1972-73 team averaged 38.3 to rank fifth.   Brown's junior team attempted 1,919 field goals, 2nd all-time.

 

 

Maurice Buckingham (1972-1974)

 

Buckingham led Boise State during the 1972-73 season, scoring an even 16 points a game.  That year, Maurice and the Broncos attempted 1,919 field goals, which ranks third in the Boise State record book. 

 

The Broncos were 11-15 in 1972-73 and 5-10 in the Big Sky Conference.  The following year, Boise State went 12-14, Head Coach Bus Connor's first full year leading the team.

 


Jason Ellis (2001-2005)

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketHere was a Bronco that played with determination, heart and soul.  There may have been Broncos with more talent, but no one that gave more effort or that was more relentless in the pursuit of bettering themselves and their team.

 

When he played his last game in March of 2005, Ellis went out as the school's record holder in terms of total rebounds with 948.  Of course, Bill Otey's four-year total including junior college was higher, but Ellis beat the next best four-year starter, Bruce Bolden, by 181 rebounds.  Ellis's average of 7.9 per game ranks third behind only Otey (15.1) and Steve Wallace (10.4).

 

Ellis contributed quietly without drawing attention to himself; he did his job and that was it.  People recognize his effort.  But when you look at his accomplishments, he has to rise near the top of the all-time forwards.  Consider this:  Jason is the only Boise State player since 1968 to score over 1,000 points and grab 800 rebounds.  He also ranks fifth in blocked shots with 103 and 11th in career field goals with 389.    

 

Ellis really accepted his leadership role the past two seasons.  He hit the boards with a tenacity that saw him grab 9.0 in 2003-04 and 8.96 the following year.  Those seasons rank him sixth and seventh all-time.

 

In Ellis' junior year, the Broncos won 23 games, tied for second all-time, and scored a record 2,431 points.    They made 852 field goals (4th), attempted 1,904 field goals (also 4th), hit 221 three-pointers (4th all-time) and attempted 639 treys (3rd all-time).  They set an all-time school mark of 73.8% from the free-throw line and pulled down 1,136 rebounds, 2nd in the record books.  That team took care of the ball, allowing only 180 steals, the fifth best performance all-time.

 

In Jason's sophomore season, he helped the Broncos to a season total of 109 blocked shots, 3rd all-time. 

 

But those teams were not just known for their offense.  His sophomore year, the Broncos allowed just 296 assists (4th all-time) and 43 percent shooting by their opposition (2nd).  In Ellis' junior year, they allowed a meager 31 percent from three-point land and 43.2% overall, both third in the record books.

 

Jason led Boise State in rebounding all of his four seasons, getting progressively better.  In 2001-02, he grabbed 5.8 per game, then took command with 7.8 his sophomore season, 9.0 the following year and 8.86 his senior season.  Jason also led Boise State in field goal percentage in his sophomore and senior years, hitting 49% (102-208 and 48.9% (113-281) respectively.  Ellis joined Bronco great Bruce Bolden as the only two players in school history to lead their teams in rebounding in each of their four seasons.

 

Ellis also has another impressive statistic in his resume.  He is one of four Broncos to lead the team in blocked shots in three different seasons (Bruce Bolden, Tanoka Beard and Trever Tillman are the others).  He blocked 27 shots his sophomore year, 32 the following season and 28 his senior year.

 

Jason was tabbed as a member of the Western Athletic Conference All-Defensive Team in 2004 and 2005, and was selected to the All-WAC Tournament team in 2006.

 

Ellis's first year was disappointing, with the team slipping to 13-17 in Coach Rod Jensen's last year.  The following season was almost identical (13-16) but the Broncos enjoyed a great season in 2003-04 under Head Coach Greg Graham.  Boise State finished second during the season with a 12-6 WAC record, defeating UTEP twice and also knocking off Oregon State.  The Miners got the better of them in the post-season tournament, however, and the Broncos were chosen for the National Invitation Tournament.  They reached the Sweet Sixteen by blasting Mountain West Conference member UNLV 84-69 and downing Wisconsin-Milwaukee 73-70 before losing at Marquette 66-53.

 


Billy Fikes (1990-1992)

 

Fikes' number one quality was his incredible vertical leap.  He could be above the basket while most other players were still on their way up.  This gave him numerous advantages—he would be high on the Bronco Dunk List if there were one.  He skied high to get his teammates second chances and was credited with many tip-ins.  Because he rarely took outside shots, he made a high number of his shots, something Coach Bobby Dye was most proud.

 

Fikes ranks 1-2 all-time for field goal percentage, hitting 71.4% in 1991-92 (120-168) and 69.0% (129-187) his junior season.  No one else is close.  His leaping ability made Fikes an awesome force inside, allowing him to play much bigger than his 6'6" frame.  He could swat the ball away with the best of them, and the only reason he didn't block more was because the opposition learned quickly to avoid him.  He did block 38 in 1991-92 to rank 8th all-time.

 

With Fikes battling inside, it should be no wonder that his junior team ranks third in Bronco history with a 50.5% field goal percentage.  Also, in both years Fikes played, the Broncos blocked over 100 shots.  In his junior year, they swatted 106 away (6th all-time) and in Billy's senior season, they rejected 119, second only to the great 1993-1994 team.  Boise State allowed just 70 three-pointers in 1991-92 (3rd lowest all-time).  They couldn't even get the bombs off (just 224 and 233 in Billy's two years) for third and fifth all-time.

 

 Fikes also led the team in steals his senior year, getting 43.

 

Boise State was 18-11, 10-6 in the Big Sky in Billy's junior year, with Gonzaga and Pepperdine being two of their most impressive non-conference wins.  The Broncos were upset in the Big Sky Tournament by Idaho State, and then lost in the first round of the NIT to Southern Illinois 75-74.  The following year, Boise State was 16-13, 7-9 in the Big Sky.

 


Wilson Foster (1987-1989)

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketThe likeable Foster was such a great shooter and ball handler that he often played guard to give Chris Childs a rest.  He gave Coach Bobby Dye amazing versatility, a forward that could battle on the boards and play amazing defense and a three-point threat as well.

 

His basketball sense allowed him many free-throw opportunities, as often bigger defenders were left behind or smaller opponents were helpless to stop his long-range shots.  Foster made 129 free throws his senior year to rank seventh in Bronco history.  That year, he was awarded 157 free throws, which places him 12th in that category.  His 82.2 free-throw percentage that year is ninth all-time.

 

Wilson's career at Boise State coincided with the best years the school has ever had.  They won a record 24 games his junior year and 23 the following season.  Foster was a key component of that success.  His long-range shooting helped the Broncos set a record for three-point shooting with 44.7% in 1987-88, an act they followed up the next year with 44.1%.  Wilson's senior team also hit 71.9% of their free throws, third all-time. 

 

Defense was what made this team so incredible, though.  They stole 308 balls in 1987-88, 2nd best in school history.  They allowed just 56.3 points a game, a school record, and set another Boise State mark by allowing just 29.1 rebounds per game.  That team ranks 3rd in points allowed (1,680), 4th in field goals allowed (580), 4th in three-pointers allowed (75), 4th in three-point shots attempted (231) and 5th in rebounds allowed (874). 

 

Foster's senior team ranks 2nd in scoring average allowed (58.9), third in field goals allowed (576) and 4th in field goal attempts allowed (1,287).

 

Wilson and Boise State ran out to a 16-1 record to start the 1987-88 season and were ranked 23rd in the nation.  It is the only time in school history that the Broncos have been one of the top 25 programs in the country.  In reality, that team was much better, playing three games against top ten teams that could have gone either way.  In the end, Boise State won the Big Sky regular season with a 13-3 mark and captured the Big Sky Tournament in enemy territory.  They drew a tough Michigan team in the opening round of the NCAA Tournament and took the Wolverines down to the wire before falling 63-58.  The vast majority of that Michigan team went on to win the National Championship the following year, and seven players from the Michigan team that played Boise State played in the NBA, led by Glen Rice.

 

The Broncos had another outstanding season in Foster's senior year, going 23-7, again 13-3 in the Big Sky, and winning the regular season championship.  They did all of this without Foster's running mate at forward, Arnell Jones, who graduated in 1987.  The Broncos pounced on Gary Payton and 18th-ranked Oregon State, throwing a harassing defense at the Beavers in a landmark 53-43 win.  Boise State also had nice wins over Gonzaga, Wisconsin-Green Bay and Pepperdine that year.  An upset in the Big Sky Tournament led to an NIT berth, where Boise State fell to Oklahoma State of the Big 12 Conference.

 

Foster led Boise State in both scoring and rebounding during his senior season, hitting 15.4 points a game while grabbing 4.3 rebounds.  He also paced Coach Dye's team that year in field goal percentage, hitting 153 of 286 shots for 53.5% and free-throw shooting (129-157 for 82.2%).  Foster also led Boise State with 14 blocked shots and 40 steals his senior year.

 

Foster's great season in 1988-89 was rewarded when he was chosen to the All-Big Sky Conference team.  He also was a member of the All-Big Sky Tournament team that season.  Wilson was the 1989 winner of the Jeff Foster Memorial Award.

 

 

Eric Hayes (1985-1987)

 

Hayes paced Boise State in field goal percentage in 1985-86, hitting 72 of 142 shots for 50.7%.  Eric helped propel the team to new heights during his short stay at Boise State.  The Broncos won 22 games in his senior year, at that time a school record.  They scored 2,196 points, 7th all-time.  They also rank 4th in field goal percentage (49.7%), 4th in three-point percentage (39.1%), 3rd in free throws (544), 2nd in free-throw attempts (792).

 

Hayes and the Broncos were one of the nation's top defensive teams.  They set an all-time school record with an amazing 344 steals.  They also rank 2nd in three-pointers allowed with 68, 2nd in three-point attempts allowed (212) and 3rd in assists allowed (294).

 

Boise State was 12-16 in Eric's junior season, but rebounded nicely for a 22-8 campaign in 1986-87.  They were 22-8, 10-4 in the Big Sky.  For the first time in school history, the Broncos were selected to play in the National Invitation Tournament, where they shocked Utah 62-61 before falling in the final minutes to Washington 73-68.

 

 

Rawn Hayes (1981-1984)

 

This multi-talented Bronco's long legs allowed him to get the jump on many opponents, resulting in spectacular plays around the basket.  On one occasion, Hayes was at the free-throw line looking over the defense.  Seizing an opening, Hayes was sending home a thunderous dunk with two steps before the opposition knew what happened.  It was the most Jordanesque moment I've ever seen from a Bronco basketball player.  In fact, I think Rawn got back to the free-throw line for a three-point play before the opposition figured out what he had done!

 

His defensive ability and quick hands are what he was probably best known for, however.  Hayes accumulated 132 steals in his three-year Bronco career, seventh all-time.

 

Hayes also ranks third in steals in a season with 72, accomplished during the 1982-83 season.  Rawn also led Boise State with 37 thefts his senior season.  Perhaps his most remarkable feat, and another of those records that will be the toughest to break, is the time he had 12 steals in one basketball game, achieved when the Broncos took on Weber State on January 22, 1983!

 

Boise State handed out 480 assists in Rawn's sophomore year, fourth in the record books.  They allowed 1,734 points (5th all-time) and a 61.9 points per game average (4th) in Hayes' senior season.  Thanks to Rawn's inside presence, opponents grabbed just 854 that year, the second lowest ever in Bronco history.  Opponents averaged 30.5 caroms per game (third).  On the flip side, they couldn't disrupt the Bronco offense.  While Hayes was pilfering opponents mad, they could not do the same.  Boise State allowed just 147 steals in Rawn's senior year, an all-time school record, and allowed just 55 blocked shots, which stands third.   

 

Boise State was 11-15 in Rawn's freshman year and 10-17 the following season.  New Coach Bobby Dye took over the following year and things immediately changed with Boise State going 15-13, including a 60-52 win over #18 Fresno State and a 72-54 pounding of Gonzaga.  In Hayes' senior year, Boise State was 16-13, including a shocking win over regular season champion Montana in the Big Sky Tournament before bowing out to Nevada.

 


Aaron Haynes (2002-2004)

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketHaynes led the Broncos in scoring in his junior and senior years, with almost identical 14.7 and 14.8 averages.  He also paced the Broncos in 2003-04 in field goal percentage, hitting an even 50 percent of his shots (183-366).  He was a very good free-throw shooter for a big man, connecting on 103-134 his junior year (76.1%) and 110-140 (78.6%) the following year.  Both of those free-throw numbers led Boise State as well.

 

Haynes' senior season was special, as the Broncos won 23 games, 2nd all-time and scored 2,431 points, a school record.  Aaron and Boise State set another impressive record when they hit 73.8% from the free-throw line as a team.  They made 852 field goals (4th), attempted 1,904 (3rd), hit 221 three-pointers (tied for 4th), shot 639 treys (3rd) and pulled down 1,136 rebounds (4th).  In his first year, Haynes and the Broncos blocked 109 shots, tied for third all-time.

 

Haynes excelled on the defensive end as well, and helped his team set school marks there as well.  In 2002-03, Boise State limited opponents to 43% shooting, 2nd all-time.  The following year, Haynes didn't make things much better for the opposition, as the Broncos limited teams to 43.2% shooting.  With Aaron taking away opportunities inside, the opponents were forced to shoot from three-point range and hit just 31 percent of their shots form behind the arc, the third-lowest percentage ever for a season. 

 

Aaron is one of only Broncos in history to be perfect from the free-throw line for ten or more attempts.  He did it when it counted the most, an NIT game against UW-Milwaukee on March 20, 2004, when he hit all ten foul shots.  Haynes was selected to the Western Athletic Conference All-Newcomer Team in 2003 and the All-WAC team in 2004.

 

Haynes paced the team with 34 steals his senior year.

 

He began his professional career with the Florence Flyers of the United States Basketball League and soon caught on with Pyrbasket of Finland.  He has also played for Sundsvall in Sweden and New Jersey in the USBL.  Playing for Sundsvall last season, Haynes averaged 23.8 points and 12.6 rebounds per game.

 


Abe Jackson (1998-2002)

 

One of the most prolific scorers in Bronco history, this great talent poured in 1,660 points, officially the fourth-highest in the Boise State record books.  He ranks behind only Tanoka Beard, Steve Connor and Coby Karl in that department.  His scoring average of 15.7 is eighth.  You would expect a four-year starter to rank in several career categories and Jackson does.  He is fourth in points, eighth in average, ninth in rebounds (525), third in field goals (544), second in field goal attempts (1,318), seventh in free throws (319) and ninth in free throw attempts (397).  Jackson's all-time records of 253 three-pointers and 706 attempts were broken just last year by Coby Karl's 266 and 717, respectively. 

 

Averages, however, tell the story and Abe's 5.5 rebounding average speaks volumes, as does his 80.35 free-throw percentage (fourth all-time) over four years.

 

Jackson is one of only four Broncos to score 400 or more points in a season three different years.  Abe poured in 438 in 1999-2000, 557 the following year and 523 his senior season.  Steve Connor achieved the feat in all four of his years at Boise State, while Chris Childs and Coby Karl are tied with Jackson with three each.

 

Abe could do a lot of things well, but his specialty was the three-point shot.  He burned opponents throughout his career, but especially in 2001-02, when he nailed 92 of 281 attempts—both are all-time records.  In fact, Jackson holds three of the top five positions in both three-pointers and three-point attempts.  In 1999-2000, he made 72 (5th) of 200 (4th all-time).  The following year, he was 83 of 206, ranking second all-time in treys and third in attempts. 

 

Jackson ranks 8th in Bronco history in scoring in a season—the former Bishop Kelly Knight averaged 18.6 points in 2001-2002.  His 17.4 average in his junior year ranks 13th.  Jackson set the Bronco record with 481 field goal attempts in 2001-02.  Although he didn't get to the free throw line a lot, he was money.  He hit 70 of 84 attempts in 1999-2000, for an 83.3 free-throw percentage, ranking sixth all-time.  Abe is also 10th for his senior season with 81.9% (95-116).  He holds the all-time record for three-pointers in a game, when he blitzed the nets for nine against Gonzaga on December 9, 2000.    

 

Boise State won 21 games in Abe's freshman year, tied for the fifth best ever, and made 277 steals, fourth in the record books.    They also allowed just 61.7 points per game, which stands third, and allowed 871 rebounds, the third lowest total ever for a season.  That averaged out to only 30 rebounds per game, second in the Bronco record books.  The following year, the Boise State "D" took control, allowing just 1,679 points, one point away from an all-time record, and allowed just 569 field goals, three baskets from a school mark.  That Abe Jackson team also set the school record for allowing just 826 rebounds and allowed an average of 30.6 per game (tied for fourth).  In his senior year, the Broncos scored 2,237 points, the seventh-highest total, and attempted 531 three-pointers (sixth all-time).  Led by Jackson's howitzers, Boise State made 174 three-pointers his junior year, sixth all-time.   

 

Abe led the Broncos his final three years in scoring, hitting 16.2 points a game his sophomore season, then following that up with a 17.4 average his junior year and 18.6 points a game his senior season.  One of the best free-throw shooters in Bronco history, Abe led the Broncos all three years in that department, sinking 83.3% in 1999-2000 (72-84), 78.6% the following year on 110-140 shooting and 81.9% his senior year (95-116).  Jackson is one of only three Broncos to lead his team in free-throw shooting in three seasons—Chris Childs and Steve Connor are the others. 

 

Jackson also led the team in rebounding in 2000-2001, pulling down 5.7 a game and paced the Broncos in three-point shooting in both 2000-01 (83-206 for 40.3%) and 2001-02 (92-281 for 32.7%).  Abe even tied for the team lead in blocked shots in 2000-2001, rejecting 31 shots.

 

Jackson was a member of the All-Big West Conference Second Team in 2000, the All-Big West Team in 2001 and the All-WAC Second Team in 2002.  He also made the All-Big West Tournament team in 1999.  Abe also won the Jeff Foster Memorial Award in both 2001 and 2002.

 

Abe was a key contributor his first season in leading Boise State to a 21-8 record, 12-4 in the Big West Conference.  The Broncos won the East Division of the WAC and scored an impressive non-conference win when they shocked nationally-ranked Washington 69-61.  The Broncos reached the championship game of the post-season tournament but lost to highly-regarded New Mexico State.  The following year, the Broncos slipped to 12-15 under Coach Rod Jensen.  In Jackson's junior year, they were 17-14, including a resounding 94-69 win over Gonzaga.  Boise State slipped to 13-17 in Abe's senior year. 

 

 


Trent Johnson (1974-1978)

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketTrent was the perfect compliment to prolific guard Steve Connor and power forward Danny Jones.  His silky smooth style of play allowed him the ability to get open to drain jump shots.  He never scored over 400 points in a season, but his consistency was the key to Trent placing 10th all-time in points with 1,155.  He could also battle on the boards—in fact he ranks third in Bronco history with 702 rebounds, surprisingly ahead of Jones.  Johnson averaged 6.6 rebounds per game to rank sixth in that department. 

 

Johnson's 940 field goal attempts ranks seventh in the record books.  Those years were fun to watch; the Broncos had an explosive team.  They scored 2,293 points in Trent's sophomore year, which fourth all-time, for an average of 79.1 points a game (4th).  Boise State set a record of 559 free throws that year in 768 attempts (3rd all-time) for an average of 72.8%, the second best-ever performance by a Bronco team from the foul line.  They would pass other teams silly, setting a school record of 540 assists.  The Broncos made 867 field goals (2nd), attempted 1,809 (5th) and pulled down 1,069 rebounds (8th).  Boise State's scoring average of 82 points per game in Trent's freshman year is second in school history.  That Bronco team made 847 field goals, which is still 6th in the record books, and attempted 1,795 of them (6th).  Johnson and the Broncos grabbed 1,120 rebounds (the sixth highest total ever) for an average of 43.1 per game (2nd).  In Trent's junior year, the team dished out 475 assists (tied for 5th all-time) and the Broncos topped that the following year with 489 (which is third). 

 

Trent led the Broncos with 6.2 rebounds a game in 1977-1978.  He was selected to the All-Big Sky Conference Second Team in 1978.

 

Boise State was an even 13-13 in Johnson's first year, including a 96-87 win over Utah State.  The Broncos put it all together the following year, winning the Big Sky with an 18-11 record.  Boise State lost to Oregon 76-64, Fresno State 72-70 in overtime, Kansas 61-56 and Arkansas 72-56.  Despite that tough schedule, the Broncos drew perennial power UNLV in the opening round of the NCAA Tournament, and were thumped badly.  Boise State fell to 10-16 the following year and then was 13-14 in Trent's senior season.

 

 
Arnell Jones (1986-1988)

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketArnell was one of the most likeable Broncos ever.  He always gave his best and was a team-oriented player.  His vertical jump was reduced by an injury that caused the heavyweights of the college basketball world to all of a sudden forget about him.  Nonetheless, he perfected the other aspects of his game to become a force that those same heavyweights had trouble with.

 

Arnell's wide body allowed him to get excellent rebounding position and free-throw attempts.  He sits in fourth place with his 7.7 rebounding average while at Boise State.  His strong rebounding and discipline inside are major reasons why Arnell is third all-time in field goal percentage, hitting 61.3% of his shots (359-586). 

 

Jones is 10th all-time with 187 field goals in 1987-88.  He could make a ten-footer, but he excelled in rebounds and putbacks.  In his senior year, Arnell connected on 187 of 283 attempts for a 66.1%, third all-time.  Arnell ranks sixth and 11th all-time for the most free throws in a season (130 in 1986-87 and 119 the following year) and eighth for attempts (180 in his senior year). 

 

Jones' defensive skills allowed him to excel.  He was more often than not much quicker than the man he was guarding, allowing him to punch the ball away or flat out steal it.  Jones ranks 10th all-time in steals for a season with 54 his senior year.

 

When Arnell came to Boise State, the Broncos emerged as a formidable team to contend with.  They set a school record with a mind-blowing 344 steals, so far and away a record that #2 is the 308 steals during Arnell's senior season. They limited opponents to 68 three-pointers and 212 attempts, both 2nd all-time.  They held opponents to 294 assists, which ranks third.  Offensively, Boise State hit 49.7% of their shots for the fourth best performance in the record books.  Jones' wise play inside was a major reason.  It is no coincidence that these numbers gave the 1986-87 team 22 wins, the fourth best season ever for the Broncos.  That team ranked fourth for three-point percentage with 39.1%.  Jones and the Broncos rank third all-time with 544 free throws and second with 792 free-throw attempts.  Many times, it would be Arnell at the line completing a three-point play.

 

The 1987-88 Broncos set the standard for Boise State basketball, winning a record 24 games.  This team could do it all, and were a legitimate Top 10-caliber team.  What left fans awestruck was their defense, preached and coached by the great Bobby Dye.  Arnell and the Broncos held opponents to a paltry 56.3 points a game, the best defensive play in school history.  They allowed just 1,680 points, two points from another record, and allowed just 580 field goals by the opposition to rank fourth in that category.  Jones, fellow forward Wilson Foster and center Gregg Dodd shut down the inside, and Chris Childs, Doug Usitalo and Brian King the outside.  Opponents were able to connect on just 75 three-pointers and only could shoot 231 of them, both fourth in the record books.  Jones and the Broncos' great work ethic kept opponents from crashing the boards—they averaged just 29.1 rebounds per game, an all-time low.  They were able to get just 874 rebounds all year, the fifth lowest total of all-time.  They couldn't get any assists (312 for fifth all-time) because there wasn't anyone to throw to. 

 

The misnomer is that Coach Dye's offense wasn't thrilling.  Jones and Boise State exploded for 2,196 points in 1987-88, the eighth highest total ever.  The key statistic is that they chose their shots carefully, hitting a record 52.4% of their shots, an all-time record.   Many of those were on slam dunks or lay-ups on fast breaks generated by a tenacious defense.  However, this team was immensely talented, as they also set a school record of 44.7% from three-point land.  So it really didn't matter where they shot the ball from—it went in! 

 

Jones led the Broncos in rebounding both seasons in Boise, averaging 8.2 his junior year and 7.2 his senior season. 

 

Arnell was the Big Sky Conference Newcomer of the Year and made the All-Big Sky Second Team in 1987 and was chosen as Conference Player of the Year and the All-Big Sky Team during the magical 1987-88 season.  He also was an All-Big Sky Tournament performer in 1988.  The popular Jones was selected as the 1988 winner of the Jeff Foster Memorial Award.

 

Jones is one of only six Bronco basketball players in the school's Hall of Fame.

 

It is no coincidence that Boise State won more games in Jones' years than in any other two-year period as a major college basketball team.  Jones joined the Broncos in 1986 form junior college and the team promptly went 22-8.  That's a 10-win improvement over the previous year.  Boise State was 10-4 in the Big Sky.  The Broncos suffered a disappointing 78-77 loss to Idaho State in the opening round of the Big Sky Tournament, but were selected to play in the NIT, the first such invite in the history of the school.  Boise State downed Utah 62-61 in dramatic fashion and held a 10-point lead over Washington in the second round before getting into foul trouble and losing 73-68.

 

Arnell's senior season was the most magical in Bronco basketball history.  The Broncos started out winners of their first six games by an average of 18 points.  Included were an impressive 61-52 win at St. Mary's and an 89-49 shellacking of Gonzaga.  Wyoming, the preseason #3 team in the nation, visited the Pavilion next, and Coach Bobby Dye's team battled them tooth and nail until the end when Chris Childs slipped in the lane prior to getting a game-tying shot off.  Devastating to be sure, but the Broncos proceeded to win ten games in a row following that near-upset to move their record to 16-1 and be recognized in the polls as the #23 team in the nation. 

 

The favored Broncos won the Big Sky Tournament and entered the Big Dance.  Their opponent would be Michigan, led by Gary Grant and Glen Rice.  The Wolverines represented the third top ten team that Boise State would play and the heavy favorites swept to a lead that exceeded 20 points midway through the second half.  But the Broncos did not give up, finally playing the defense that they had been playing all year.  The harassed Big 10 team didn't know what to make of it and were thoroughly confused.  The Broncos whittled the lead down to three points with less than a minute to play.  Once again, the Broncos forced a Michigan turnover, meaning Boise State would have a chance to tie.  They got the ball to ace three-point shooter Brian King, who narrowly missed and the game was over.

 

 

 
Danny Jones (1974-1978)

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketDanny was an integral part of the 1977-78 Big Sky Championship team.  He was a great power forward, muscling his way towards the basket for numerous putbacks and thundering dunks.  He was credited with 557 rebounds to rank seventh in Bronco history and sported a 5.7 average to rank ninth. 

 

He ranks 10th with 406 career field goals and fourth in field goal percentage with 59.4%.  Danny hit 406 of 684 attempts in his Boise State career.  He is also 11th in free throws (257) and eighth in free-throw attempts (407).

 

Jones ranks sixth in Bronco history with a 60.6 field goal percentage in the championship season.  He hit 140 of 231 attempts.  In his sophomore year, his 59.3 field goal percentage ranks 10th (131-221).

 

Jones and the Broncos are ranked second (82 points a game in1974-75) and fourth (79.1 ppg in '75-76) in scoring in the record book.  In his freshman year, they were second in rebound average (43.1), sixth in rebounds (1,120), sixth in field goals (847) and field goal attempts (1,795).  In Dan's sophomore year, Boise State set a record for free throws (559) and assists (540) and were second in free-throw percentage (72.8%), third in free throw attempts (768), second in field goals (867), fifth in field goal attempts (1,809) and eighth in rebounds (1,069).  In his senior year, Boise State ranks third all-time in assists with 489.

 

Danny led Boise State in rebounding in the 1976-77 season, averaging 7.7 a game.  Jones led Boise State in field goal percentage his final three seasons.  In addition to the numbers above, he hit 115 of 198 shots his junior year for 58.1%.  He is the only player in Boise State history to lead his team in that department in three seasons.

 

Boise State was an even 13-13 in Jones' first year, including a 96-87 win over Utah State.  The Broncos put it all together the following year, winning the Big Sky with an 18-11 record.  Boise State lost to Oregon 76-64, Fresno State 72-70 in overtime, Kansas 61-56 and Arkansas 72-56.  Despite that tough schedule, the Broncos drew perennial power UNLV in the opening round of the NCAA Tournament, and were thumped badly.  Boise State fell to 10-16 the following year and then was 13-14 in Dan's senior season.

 


Justin Lyons (1997-2000)

Lyons could jump with the best of them.  Lyons led Boise State in rebounding in the 1999-2000 season, averaging 5.3 rebounds per game.  He also paced the team in blocked shots with 13.

 

Boise State won 21 games in 1998-99, tied for fifth all-time.  Justin and the Broncos recorded 288 steals, third only to the great teams of 1986-88.  They also held opponents to 61.7 points per game, which is third best all-time and allowed just 30 rebounds per game, #2 in the record books.  In Lyons' senior year, Boise State allowed just 826 rebounds, an all-time record.  Justin was a major reason why, with his leaping ability and boxing out.  The Broncos held opponents 569 field goals, the second best performance ever, and only 1,278 field goal attempts, which rank third. 

 

Justin was selected by his coaches to receive the prestigious Jeff Foster Memorial Award in 2000.

 

Boise State was 17-13 in Justin's first year, with a 9-7 record.  The Broncos defeated BYU 83-67, Washington State 79-72 and was ahead of UCLA in Pauley Pavilion the entire game until the Bruins pulled out an 81-75 victory.  Lyons and the Broncos won the East Division of the Big West the following year with a 12-4 league mark and 21-8 overall.  They downed nationally-ranked Washington in the Pavilion 69-61 during the season and reached the Big West Championship game before losing to New Mexico State.  Boise State slipped to 12-15 in Justin's senior year.

 


Richard Morgan (1998-2002)

Morgan is tied for ninth in career blocked shots with 60.  He led Boise State with 24 blocks his freshman year.

 

The Broncos won 21 games in Morgan's freshman year, tied for 5th all-time and recorded 277 steals, 4th best in the record books.  The Broncos allowed 871 rebounds, tied for 3rd in school history, for an average of just 30 a game, which ranks second.  The following year, Richard and the Broncos improved upon that by allowing just 826 rebounds by the opposition all year, far and away the school record.  They allowed just 1,679 points, one away from the all-time school record.  Boise State held opponents to 61.7 points a game to rank third.  They allowed 569 field goals (2nd) and 1,278 attempts (3rd).  Richard and the Broncos also set the school record by allowing just 275 assists that year.    In his junior year, Boise State scored 2,237 points, the sixth highest ever.

 

With Morgan's inside play, Boise State crept over the 20-win plateau in 1998-99 with a 21-8 record, 12-4 in the Big West Conference.  The Broncos won the East Division of the WAC and scored an impressive non-conference win when they shocked nationally-ranked Washington 69-61.  The Broncos reached the championship game of the post-season tournament but lost to highly-regarded New Mexico State.  The following year, the Broncos slipped to 12-15 under Coach Rod Jensen.  In Morgan's junior year, they were 17-14, including a resounding 94-69 win over Gonzaga.  Boise State slipped to 13-17 in Richard's senior year. 

 

 


Sherman Morris (1992-1994)

 

Morris performed for the Broncos in the clutch, being named to the All-Big Sky Conference Tournament team in 1994.

 

In his first year, the Broncos won 21 games, tied for 5th all-time.  The following season, Morris and the Broncos set a school record with 143 blocked shots.  They made 848 field goals, hit 511 free throws and attempted 712 from the charity stripe, all also ranking 5th.  They pulled down 1,099 rebounds (4th all-time) and handed out 520 assists (2nd).  They also rank 4th for field goal percentage-defense, holding opponents to 43.6 percent shooting. 

 

Morris helped the Broncos to two Big Sky Tournament Championships.  In 1992-93, Boise State was 21-8 and 10-4 in conference with a nice win over Wyoming.  They swept past Weber State and Idaho to secure the league's automatic berth in the NCAA's.  There, they ran into a deadly three-point shooting Vanderbilt.  The following year, the Broncos struggled a bit in the season, going 17-13 and 7-7 in the Big Sky.  Coach Bobby Dye had the team playing its best ball of the season at the end, however, winning seven of their last eight games, including surprising wins over Weber State and Idaho State to reach the NCAA Tournament again.  Morris and the Broncos put a scare into the nationally-ranked Cardinals before losing 67-58. 

 


Bill Otey (1968-1970)

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketOtey was a phenomenal leaper who always played for position off the glass.  It was his specialty, and Otey excelled at it.  Otey had 805 rebounds in the two seasons that he played major college basketball.  He also dominated the glass for two years while playing junior college for the Broncos.  Bruce Bolden, Trent Johnson, Tanoka Beard and others could not accomplish in four years what Otey did in two years of playing at the NCAA level—Otey holds the all-time record for an off-the-charts 15.1 rebounds per game average and Steve Wallace is second with 10.4 

 

He has not only the Bronco rebounding record at a sensational 17.3 in 1968-69, but is #2 on the list with 13.0 his senior year.  The next Bronco, Steve Wallace, is all the way back at 11.0.

 

Otey's rebounding allowed him to get numerous second-chance baskets.  In 1968-69, Otey made 192 field goals, #8 in Bronco history.  His 407 attempts that year ranks 10th.  Bill also holds the all-time school record for rebounds in a game with 24, which he set on two occasions—on January 31st of 1969 and February 10th of that same year.

 

Otey helped the Broncos average 83.3 points a game in the 1968-69 season, still the tops in Bronco history.  Boise State's 79.6 points a game the following year ranks 3rd.  That '68 Bronco team also holds records for field goals made, with an astounding (956), field goals attempted (2,146), rebounds (an incredible 1,545), rebound average (57.2) and field goal percentage defense—opponents shot just 38.8% against them.  Bill's 70-71 team is 4th in free throws made (526) and free throws attempted (746) and 5th in free throw percentage (71.8%).

 

Otey's Bronco teams were 26-5 in his freshman year, 19-8 in 1968-69, 20-8 his junior year and 10-16 in Boise State's first year in the Big Sky.  Boise State was invited to the NAIA National Tournament, where they blitzed Southern Oregon 101-70 before losing twice to Linfield.  Included in the 1968 season was a 93-75 win over Idaho State in Boise State's first year as a four-year school.  The following year, the Broncos blasted Pacific 94-67 and 99-52, downed Montana State 69-58, blew away Gonzaga 90-74, beat Montana 89-77 and defeated Idaho State again 98-88.  In Otey's senior season, Boise State downed Idaho 77-76, beat Idaho State 76-74, creamed Gonzaga by the same 90-74 score, beat Northern Arizona 82-65 and whipped Montana 98-74.  The 1970-71 Bronco team also holds the all-time school record for points in a game (118) when they outraced Portland State 118-96.  They also hold records for field goals attempted (90) vs. Montana and rebounds in a game (60) vs. Carroll College. 

 

Bill led the Broncos in scoring in 1968-69, hitting 16.1 points per game.  He also paced Boise State on the boards with 17.3 rebounds a game his junior year and 13.0 his senior season.

 

Otey was drafted by the Chicago Bulls of the National Basketball Association in the 15th round of the 1970 draft.

 


Seth Robinson (2004-2007)

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketA hard-worker that quickly became a fan favorite, Robinson pulled down 356 rebounds in his three-year career.  Seth averaged six points and four rebounds for Boise State.  

He grabbed 136 rebounds his junior year and also led the Broncos in field goal percentage (88-152 for 57.9%).

 

The Broncos of Robinson's era had the #2 and #3 positions in school history for points scored but also played a record number of games.  They scored 2,393 points his sophomore year and 2,360 last season, shy of the number needed to rank in the top five for scoring average.  Seth's sophomore team scored 856 field goals, third highest and attempted 1,987, which ranks second.  They set all-time records with 263 three-pointers and 735 attempts from behind the line.  That team also set the record for rebounds with 1,193.

 

The following year, Seth and the Broncos made 230 three-pointers (2nd to the figure in 2004-05) and shot 629 of them, which ranks fourth.  In Robinson's senior year, Boise State scored 2,360 points to rank fifth, attempted 1,828 field goals (also 5th), shot 230 three-pointers (2nd) and attempted 649 treys (2nd).  They also averaged 38.4 rebounds per game, the fourth best average in school history, and grabbed 1,190 boards to rank second in that category.  Robinson helped the Broncos block 108 shots, the fifth-highest season total.   

 

Under Coach Greg Graham, the Broncos went 16-18 in 2004-05.  The following year, Robinson and Boise State were 14-15, 6-10 in the WAC.  In Seth's senior year, the Broncos were 17-14 and 8-8 in the WAC. 

 

 

 




Roland Smith (1984-1986)

 

A solid outside shooter, Smith led Boise State in free-throw shooting in 1984-85, sinking 76 of 98 attempts for 77.6%.

 

Smith's hustle and leadership were recognized as he won the first two Jeff Foster Memorial Awards.

 

By this time, the Broncos were on the verge of greatness, and Coach Bobby Dye's philosophy was beginning to take hold.  In Smith's junior year, opponents averaged just 30.6 rebounds a game, tied for 4th for the lowest average.  The following year, opponents blocked 57 shots, tied for the 5th lowest total.

 

Roland's 1984 team went 16-13, including a win over Wyoming.  They gave a small hint of things to come with a shocking 67-54 win over Larry Krystkowiak and heavily-favored Montana in the Big Sky Tournament.  Nevertheless, that victory did not immediately turn around the program, as Smith and the Broncos were 12-16 the following season.

 

 

Mike Tolman (1992-1993/1995-1998)

 

Tolman brought an outstanding long-range shot to the position.  He hit 171 three-pointers, fifth all-time and also ranks fifth for long-range attempts with 427.  Tolman is seventh in the Bronco record books with his three-point percentage of 40.046%.  Further, Mike is fifth in Bronco history with 145 steals.

 

Tolman made 44.3% of his tries in 1997-98 to rank sixth in Bronco history.  He made 77 three-pointers that year, the fourth highest total in Bronco history.  He ranks seventh in attempts (174 his sophomore season) that season.

 

In Mike's freshman year, the Broncos won 21 games, which is tied for 5th best in the record books.  His return in 1995-96 was key to Boise State hitting 198 three-pointers to rank seventh.  That Bronco team holds school records by limiting the opposition to 60 three-pointers and 195 three-point attempts and ranks fifth in limiting opponents to 1,296 field goal attempts.  The shots those opponents did take from behind the arc were not successful, as Boise State held them to 30.8% shooting, the second worst total ever.  The following season, the Broncos connected on 223 treys, which was a record until the Coby Karl/Eric Lane teams of the last several years.  Tolman and the Broncos made another 221 his senior season.  In Tolman's last three years, Boise State ranks 5-6-7 in three-point attempts as well (613 his junior year, 570 his sophomore season and 561 his senior year).  Unlike those later years, however, Tolman's senior team ranks third in three-point percentage with 39.4%.

 

Tolman helped Boise State hit 511 free throws in his freshman year out of 712—both are fifth all-time.  In his sophomore year, the Broncos set a school record by limiting opponents to 1,678 points; they rank fifth in scoring average-defense by allowing 62.1 points a game.  That same team also set a record for allowing the fewest field goals (566), is second in opposition field goal attempts (1,236) and fourth in limiting opponents to 56 blocked shots.  The Broncos also screened out well enough to limit opponent's rebounds to 871, tied for 3rd best.  In 1996-97, Boise State set the all-time record by having just 44 shots blocked by the opposition and held opponents to 283 assists that year, second best in school history.       

 

Tolman showed his inside strength in leading Boise State in rebounding in 1997-98, averaging 5.8 rebounds a game.  He also paced the Broncos in free-throw shooting his junior year with 78.9% shooting on 56 of 71 free throws and led the team in three-point shooting in both his sophomore year (49-123 for 39.8%) and senior season (77 of 174 for 44.3%).  Mike also lead the Broncos in steals his senior year with 53, the ninth-highest total in school history.

 

Tolman was selected to the All-Big West Conference Tournament team in 1998.  He also was the winner of the Jeff Foster Memorial Award in 1998.

 

In Mike's first year, the Broncos captured the Big Sky Tournament, defeating Weber State and Idaho to reach the Big Dance.  The Broncos ran into a sharp-shooting Vanderbilt team that ended their season with a record of 21-8.  When Tolman returned, Boise State was 15-13, 10-4 in the Big Sky.  The Broncos entered the Big West Conference the next year and were 14-13 overall with wins over Pepperdine, BYU and Gonzaga.  In Mike's senior year, Boise State improved to 17-13, with an 83-67 pounding of BYU and a 79-72 win over Washington State.

 

 

Dave Williams (1979-1980)

 

Williams ranks 10th in Boise State history with a 15.1 average.  He led the Broncos in scoring that year and also added 38 steals to pace the team.  Boise State was 11-15 in Williams' only season.

 

The Broncos were 10-16 that year, 4-10 in the Big Sky.

 

 

Shambric Williams (1992-1994)

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketWilliams was not a prolific three-point shooter, but he was an intelligent one.  His 44.6% ranks fourth in Boise State history for a single season, as he made 41 of 92 tries in 1993-94.

 

Williams and the Broncos won 21 games his junior year, tied for fifth all-time.  He helped them get to the free-throw line 712 times, with the Broncos making 511 of them—both are 5th in school history.  On the defensive side, Boise State set records by holding opponents to 60 three-pointers and 195 three-point attempts and rank second by limiting opponents to 30.8% three-point shooting.  In his senior season, Shambric helped the team block 143 shots, far and away a Bronco record.  Boise State recorded 1,099 rebounds, 7th all time, and hit 848 field goals, fifth in the record books.  They also dished out 520 assists that year, the 2nd highest total ever, and nabbed 267 steals, 5th all-time.  Defensively, they held opponents to 43.6% shooting (4th). 

 

He paced the Broncos in free-throw shooting his senior year, connecting on 92 of 127 attempts from the charity stripe for a 72.4 percentage.

 

Shambric was a member of the All-Big Sky Conference team his senior year and then was named Most Valuable Player and a member of the All-Big Sky Tournament team his senior year.  He also was the 1994 recipient of the Jeff Foster Memorial Award.

 

Williams helped the Broncos win the Big Sky Tournament both seasons at Boise State.  They were 21-8 his junior year and 17-13 the following season.  The team drew Vanderbilt in the 1993 NCAA Tournament and was beaten thoroughly.  The following year, Louisville just about pulled off a similar result before a torrid Bronco rally cut the margin to two points in the final minute of play.  The Cardinals eventually won 67-58.

 

 

 

George Wilson (1973-1975)

 

Wilson ranks fifth all-time with 9.1 rebounds in 1973-74.  He led Boise State that season in both rebounds and field goal percentage (153-260 for 58.8%).

 

Boise State was 12-14 in Wilson's first season, improving slightly to 13-13, 7-7 in the Big Sky Conference the following year.

 

 


Kejuan Woods (1998-2001)

 

Woods could score, rebound and play defense.  In three seasons, he had 125 steals to rank ninth all-time.

 

In Woods' sophomore year, the Broncos won 21 games, tied for the 5th best performance.  The Broncos held opponents to 61.7 points a game, 3rd in school history.  Woods helped the team get 277 steals, 4th best for a Bronco team.  Good positioning led to just 871 steals by Boise State opponents, tied for the 3rd lowest total ever.  The following season, the Bronco defense dominated.  They held the opposition to 275 assists, an all-time record, and 1,679 points, one away from an all-time record, while limited teams to 569 field goals (2nd), 1,278 field goal attempts (3rd) and just 30.6 rebounds a game, tied for 4th.  In his senior year, Boise State scored 2,237 points, 6th all-time. 

 

Kejuan's positioning and ability to penetrate inside led to team-leading shooting in both 1998-99 and the following year.  Woods connected on 96 of 184 attempts his junior year for 52.2%, then followed that up with 60-122 shooting for 49.2%.

 

Woods was a member of the All-Big West Conference Freshman Team in 1998.

 

Boise State was 21-8, 12-4 in the Big West in Woods' first year, and captured the East Division championship.  The next year, they slipped to 12-15 and then rebounded to 17-14 in Kejuan's senior season.


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