Meet The New Recruits (Offensive Players)

Yes the Buffs lost four out of their five offensive linemen, their quarterback and two of their star running backs, so what! The Buffs recruited some very talented blue-chippers on the offensive side of the ball and some of them may play as freshmen. Here are the Bio's for the Buff's offensive recruits.

Univeristy of Colorado Offensive Recruits EDWIN HARRISON OL, 6-5, 300, Fr., HS, Houston, Texas (Westbury)

HIGH SCHOOL—As a senior, he earned Prep Football Report and SuperPrep all-Southwest honors, with PrepStar naming him to its all-Midlands team. PFR ranked him as the No. 66 player in the region (the seventh offensive lineman), while SuperPrep placed him No. 108 in the region (the 21st OL) and Rivals.com tabbed him as the No. 30 offensive lineman nationally and as the No. 70 player in Texas.

He earned first-team all-district (18-5A) and Houston Chronicle All-Greater Houston honors, in addition to being named to the Texas Top 100 Lists by both the Chronicle and the Dallas Morning News (he also made several other top player lists). He also claimed a host of awards, including the George Bush/Kiwanis Club Sports Hero Award and the Houston Touchdown Club Scholar-Athlete Award, and was named as an outstanding high school senior by the Derrick Thomas Foundation.

He earned first-team all-district honors as a junior, when he was the team's most valuable lineman and was an All-Greater Houston Underclassmen Team selection; he was also second-team all-district as a sophomore. A three-year starter at offensive tackles, he had 70 dominant (pancake) blocks and 15 touchdown blocks as a senior, when he did not allow a sack or get called for a single penalty. He blocked for the district's leading passer, Michael Nichols (1,800 yards and 20 TDs) and a two-back rotation that gained 1,200 yards.

As a junior, he had 65 dominant and 13 touchdown blocks with no sacks allowed while being flagged just one time. He had 60 dominant and 10 touchdown blocks as a sophomore, when he allowed just one sack and was penalized once. Thus, he had 195 career pancakes and 38 touchdown blocks while allowing just one sack and being called for only two penalties.

Some top games included a battle against Lamar his senior year, when he had six pancakes and a touchdown block in shutting down John Williams, the Houston Chronicle's area defensive player of the year. He had a career-high eight ‘cakes with two TD blocks against Worthing the same year. Westbury was 5-5 both his junior and senior seasons, and was 6-4 his sophomore year, finishing third in the district, under coach George Campbell. He also lettered in outdoor track (shot put).

ACADEMICS—He is interested in psychology as his major at Colorado. He Is an active member of the National Honor Society, the English Honor Society and the French Honor Society, and also belongs to the National Science Scholars.

VITALS—Has 5.25speed in the 40 and bench presses 385 pounds.

RECRUITING—He selected Colorado over Arkansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Tennessee, Kansas and Notre Dame.

PERSONAL—He was born Nov. 18, 1984 in Houston, Texas. His grandfather (Calvin Jones) won the Outland Trophy as the nation's outstanding interior lineman as a senior at Iowa in 1955; Jones was the first two-time consensus All-American in Iowa history, and his No. 62 was retired by the Hawkeyes. His hobbies include traveling, as he lists the Bahamas as his favorite place he has ever visited, and skiing. He received the Eagle Scout Badge in 2001 for helping build a library for "The Project Royal," which helps single moms and kids. He was also active with his church in both choir and youth fellowship.

BERNARD JACKSON QB, 6-2, 190, Fr., HS, Corona, Calif. (Santiago)

HIGH SCHOOL—As a senior, he earned first-team all-CIF, all-Riverside County and all-Mountain View League honors, while both PrepStar and Prep Football Report named him to their all-West teams and SuperPrep selected him to its all-Far West team. PFR ranked him as the No. 45 player in California and the No. 12 quarterback; SuperPrep ranked him No. 39 overall in California (the No. 6 QB), while Rivals.com rated him the No. 10 quarterback in the nation (and No. 61 in all of California).

As a captain, he was his team's most valuable player and offensive player of the year for a second straight time his senior year; as a junior, he garnered all-league first-team and all-county honorable mention honors. A true dual-threat quarterback, an opposing high school coach said he "has the arm strength, decision-making skills and running ability to make a name for himself at the next level." He rushed 160 times for 1,032 yards and 14 scores, with a long run of 65 yards. He also completed 82-of-162 passes (50.6 percent) for 1,314 yards and 15 touchdowns, with just six interceptions.

As a junior, he rushed 70 times for 660 yards and four touchdowns, with a long of 55. He completed 50 percent of his passes (65-of-130) for 1,042 yards and 11 touchdowns, tossing just four interceptions to compliment his rushing stats. He saw limited action as a wide receiver his sophomore season.

Top career games included a playoff win over San Bernardino his senior year, when he completed 4-of-10 passes for 246 yards (a gaudy 61.5 yards per pass) and three touchdowns. He also rushed eight times for 100 yards and two scores, one for 65 yards. In a 35-14 win over Plaoma Valley the same year, he was 6-of-12 passing for 200 yards and two scores, and added 60 yards rushing on five attempts. Santiago was 9-3 his senior season (losing in the CIF quarterfinals), 9-3 his junior year (losing in the quarterfinals once again) and 4-6 his sophomore year under coach Steve Mitchell. He also played baseball and basketball as a freshman.

ACADEMICS—He is interested in psychology as his major at Colorado. He owns a 3.3 grade point average as a prep.

VITALS—Has 4.5 speed in the 40 and bench presses 275 pounds.

RECRUITING—He selected Colorado over Kansas State and Nebraska.

PERSONAL—He was born April 2, 1985 in Los Angeles, Calif. His hobbies include playing basketball, lifting weights and helping coach his little brothers (12, 9) in football

DANIEL JOLLY RB, 6-1, 220, Fr., HS, San Antonio, Texas (John Marshall)

HIGH SCHOOL—A three-time first-team all-district (28-5A) performer, he scored all kinds of honors his senior year. PrepStar named him to its all-Midlands team, SuperPrep tabbed him all-Southwest (ranking him as the No. 81 player in Texas, and the fifth running back), while Rivals.com rated him the No. 18 running back nationally. He was the district most valuable player, and was also named the San Antonio player of the year. He was a first-team all-state selection by the Associated Press, with the coaches placing him on their second-team.

As a senior, he rushed 292 times for 2,109 yards and 23 touchdowns, averaging 7.2 yards per carry with a long run of 70 yards. He topped the 100-yard mark 10 times in 11 games, with the only exception against Warren, when he rushed twice for 62 yards and two scores in a 42-0 win.

As a junior, he rushed for 1,282 yards and 15 scores, and had 963 yards and 13 TDs as a sophomore. He caught 20 passes for 100 yards and two scores as a sophomore; five passes for 20 yards as a junior and none as a senior. He also averaged 20 yards or more on kick returns all three seasons. He played some fullback as a freshman, picking up 112 yards on 12 tries. Two of his top career games came his senior year: against O'Connor in a 28-21 win, he rushed for 300 yards and three touchdowns, including the game winner. In a 37-35 win over William Taft, he scampered for 278 yards and four touchdowns, gaining 198 of the yards in the second half. As a junior, he previously had lit up the Taft defense, going for 225 yards and two scores in a 24-14 victory. John Marshall under coach Mike Carew was 10-2 his senior year, winning the district title before falling in the second round of the playoffs, and was 7-5 his junior year and 14-1 his sophomore season (reaching the state semifinal after winning the city championship with an undefeated regular season). He also lettered in track (sprints, relays), and played AAU basketball from seventh to ninth grade. With his team ranked in the nation's top 25 in ninth grade, earning a trip to nationals (he averaged 20 points and 10 rebounds that year).

ACADEMICS—He is interested in communications as his major at Colorado. A consistent member of the honor roll at John Marshall, he owns a 3.0 grade point average and is in the "Gifted & Talented Program."

VITALS—Has 4.48 speed in the 40, bench presses 340 pounds, and owns a 35-inch vertical jump.

RECRUITING—He selected Colorado over Texas A&M, Arizona State and TCU.

PERSONAL—He was born Sept. 3, 1984 in Fairfield, Calif. Hobbies include the Korean Martial Art "Kuk Sool", as he started when he was just three and at the time was the youngest to receive the black belt at age 8 and followed that up by being the youngest to win a world championship (at age 9). He also enjoys computers, video games, electronics and video editing (says he's a "Tech-head"). He likes to just be known simply as "Jolly" (perhaps he'll become the "Sting" or "Bono" of college football). Committed to CU around Father's Day 2002, one of the early ones in the class to do so. KHARYLAKE MARTIN OL, 6-5, 345, Fr., HS, Dayton, Texas (Dayton)

HIGH SCHOOL—As a senior, he earned first-team all-state, all-district 21-4A and all-Greater Houston area honors. PrepStar named him to its all-Midlands team, while SuperPrep tabbed him all-Southwest, ranking him as the No. 78 player in Texas (and the 13th offensive lineman). Rivals.com ranked him as the No. 66 offensive lineman in the nation.

As a junior, he played at the Marine Military Academy in Arlington, but saw action in only six games, missing the middle portion of the season after he suffered a torn meniscus and partially torn LCL. A three-year starter at offensive tackle, he posting 109 pancake blocks as a senior, with 32 scoring blocks while blocking for a 1,600-yard rushing quarterback and a 1,500-yard tailback.

He had 90 pancakes as a junior, when he did not allow a quarterback sack or pressure, again blocking for two 1,000-yard plus backs, and in four games as a sophomore, he had 20 pancakes and five scoring blocks. He played some defensive tackles as a soph, racking up 25 tackles, five hurries and two tackles for loss. Three of his top career games came as a senior: he graded out to 99 percent in a 64-14 win over Channel View, when his 12 pancake blocks helped his team to 500 yards of total offense (400 rushing). He graded to 95 percent in a 55-17 win over Smiley, again with 12 ‘cakes with the offense picking up 400-plus running yards, and he received a 94 percent grade in a 54-26 win over Forest Brook, with 12 pancakes as the team gained 570 yards, 500 on the ground. Dayton was 12-1 his senior year, advancing to the third round of the playoffs, and was 8-4 his sophomore season under coach Jerry Stewart (Marine Military Academy was 6-4 the season he was there). He also threw the shot put on the track team, and in power lifting, he was the alternate at the state meet his junior year after recording a 355 bench press, 600 pound squat and 575 dead lift.

ACADEMICS—He is interested in mechanical engineering as his major at Colorado. A member of the "A-B" honor roll during high school, he sported a 4.3 grade point average (on a 5.0 scale).

VITALS—Has 5.5 speed in the 40, bench presses 355 pounds and owns a 600 pound squat.

RECRUITING—He selected Colorado over Oklahoma, Central Florida, SMU, Texas A&M and Texas Tech.

PERSONAL—He was born June 24, 1985 in Houston, Texas. His hobbies include hunting and fishing (both off-shore and stream); he is also an Eagle Scout and has worked for Habitat for Humanity. (First name is pronounced "carry-lake".)

TYLER POLUMBUS OL, 6-8, 245, Fr., HS, Englewood, Colo. (Cherry Creek)

HIGH SCHOOL—As a senior, he earned SuperPrep All-American and all-Midlands honors, while Prep Football Report and PrepStar named him to their first-team all-Midlands squads. PrepStar also named him to its pre-season all-Midlands team. SuperPrep tabbed him the No. 42 offensive lineman in the country (the No. 30 overall player in the Midlands), with Prep Football Report selecting him as the No. 16 player in the Midlands (the fifth offensive lineman). Rivals.com selected him as the No. 58 tackle in the nation (and the No. 6 player in Colorado.) He was named first-team All-Colorado and all-state (5A) by the Denver Post, as he also garnered all-state second team honors from the Rocky Mountain News. He also received first-team all-Centennial League honors on his way to being voted his team's most inspirational player.

As a junior, he earned second-team all-state honors (Rocky Mountain News) and first-team all-league accolades. As a senior, he blocked for a 1,200-yard rusher, as he allowed no sacks, just four pressures and racked up 78 domination blocks and 12 touchdown blocks. As a junior, he plowed the way for a pair of 1,000-yard rushers, as he recorded 75 domination blocks, 14 touchdown blocks, and allowed only one sack. He had 55 domination and eight touchdown blocks as a sophomore, allowing just three sacks. Top career games included a 21-14 win over Mullen his junior year, when he allowed zero sacks, had seven domination blocks and threw a key block on the game winning touchdown run. In a win against Bear Creek his senior season, he once again allowed no sacks or quarterback pressures, as he recorded a career-high 15 domination blocks and two touchdown blocks. Cherry Creek was 6-4 his senior year, 9-3 his junior season (losing to Mullen in the state semifinals) and 5-5 as a sophomore under coach Rocky Martin. He also lettered in basketball twice as a center, and also played baseball.

ACADEMICS—He is interested in business as his major at Colorado. He owns a 3.1 grade point average as a prep and scored a 1210 on the SAT.

VITALS—Has 4.9 speed in the 40 and bench presses 280 pounds.

RECRUITING—He selected Colorado over Nebraska, Arizona, Kansas State and Washington.

PERSONAL—He was born April 10, 1985 in Denver. His hobbies include playing basketball and tinkering with computers. He is also an avid-churchgoer and a member of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Two members of his family played sports at CU: Father (Tad) lettered in football (1965-66), and an uncle (Gary Polumbus) lettered three years in golf and twice made it to the NCAA Championships. A sister (Heather) played tennis for the University of San Diego.

STEPHONE ROBINSON WR, 5-9, 180, Fr., HS, Denver, Colo. (Mullen)

HIGH SCHOOL—As a senior, he earned all-Midlands honors from PrepStar, Prep Football Report and SuperPrep, as PFR ranked him as the No. 18 player in the region (the second receiver), and SuperPrep tabbing him No. 36 regionally (and as the third WR). Rivals.com ranked him as the No. 27 receiver in the nation, and called him "arguably the top prospect in Colorado." He also garnered all-Colorado (all classes) and all-state (5A) honors from both the Denver Post and Rocky Mountain News.

A two-time first-team all-Centennial League pick, he was also first team all-Colorado and all-state as a junior. A four-year starter at wide receiver, as a senior, he caught 35 passes for 896 yards and eight scores, averaging 25.6 yards per catch, and including his kick return yardage, he accounted for over 1,600 all-purpose yards despite missing the better part of four games with a sprained ankle. As a junior, he led the state in receiving with 73 catches for 1,230 yards and 10 touchdowns, while returning four kicks (two punts, two kickoffs) for touchdowns. He averaged over 18 yards per punt return and 30-plus yards on kickoff returns. He caught 20 passes his sophomore year, six for scores, and he had 19 receptions as a freshman.

He saw some brief time on defense as a junior (safety/cornerback), making around 25 tackles in four games. Mullen posted a 40-11 record during his time there; the Mustangs were 10-2 his senior year and 9-4 his junior season under coach Jay Madden, and were 11-2 his sophomore year (reaching the state semis) and 10-3 his freshman year under Mick McCall. He also lettered two years in basketball (guard) and twice in track (sprints and relays).

ACADEMICS—He is interested in business and sports marketing as potential majors at Colorado. He was a member of the French Honor Society as a prep. Owner of a 3.57 grade point average, he was one of 11 statewide honorees to receive the prestigious National Football Foundation/College Football Hall of Fame Scholar-Athlete award.

VITALS—Has 4.41 speed in the 40, bench presses 285 pounds and owns a 38-inch vertical jump.

RECRUITING—He selected Colorado over Oregon, Arizona State and San Diego State.

PERSONAL—He was born Dec. 31, 1984 in Denver. His hobbies include playing basketball, listening to music and lifting weights. An uncle (Thadus Swazer) played college football, starting out at Colorado in 1992 and finishing up at Kansas State. (First name is pronounced "steph-on".) JOE SANDERS TE, 6-4, 220, Fr., HS, Nashville, Tenn. (Hillsboro)

HIGH SCHOOL—A standout at both tight end and linebacker, he lettered all four years during his high school career. As a senior, he earned PrepStar all-Southeast honors at tight end and was tabbed the No. 5 player in Tennessee, while Rivals.com ranked him the No. 34 tight end in the country. He was selected as the Nashville Tennessean's player of the year in Tennessee, also claiming the defensive player of the year honor and was a finalist for the class 4A Mr. Football award.

He was named to the all-state, all-Midstate, all-region (11-4A) and first-team all-city at both tight end and linebacker. One of his Hillsboro's captains, he was also selected defensive MVP for his region, city and team. He was invited to play in the Tennessee-Kentucky All-Star game (summer 2003).

His junior year, he was once again named to the all-state, all-Midstate, all-region and all-city fist-teams at both positions, as he garnered all-region and all-city honorable mention honors during his sophomore year. As a senior, he caught 25 passes for 480 yards and seven touchdowns. On defense, he totaled 133 tackles (65 solo), 30 tackles for loss, three sacks, four fumble recoveries (one for a 65-yard touchdown), two forced fumbles, two interceptions, 20 quarterback hurries and 15 pass deflections.

As a junior on offense, he had 34 receptions for 650 yards and 15 touchdowns. On defense, he was in on 105 tackles (15 for loss), had 15 sacks, three fumble recoveries, one forced fumble, three interceptions, 40 quarterback hurries and 15 pass deflections.

During his sophomore year, he caught 15 passes for 280 yards and six touchdowns, adding 63 total tackles (10 for loss), six sacks, three fumble recoveries, one forced fumble and 10 passes broken up on defense.

He did not play offense as a freshman, but started at free safety and was in on 58 tackles, had two sacks, one forced fumble, one fumble recovery, five interceptions and 20 pass deflections. Top career games included a state semifinals win over Pearl-Cohn as a junior, when he caught four passes for 120 yards, including a game-winning 72-yard touchdown. On defense, he added nine tackles (one for loss), two sacks and one forced fumble. That same year, in a 19-13 win over Smyrna, he had two catches for 60 yards.

On defense, he added nine tackles (two for losses), one sack, one pass deflection and a game-clinching interception that was tipped by teammate Chris Russell on a desperation pass to the endzone. His senior season, in a win over Overton, he had three receptions for 85 yards and one score, in addition to 14 tackles (three for losses), one sack and one pass break up. Under coach Ron Aydelott, Hillsboro complied an impressive 50-6 record during his career, as it won its region all four years. Hillsboro was 14-1 his senior year (falling short in the state championship game a second straight year to Maryville, 29-26), 14-1 his junior season (Maryville won it, 34-27), 13-1 his sophomore year (losing in the state semifinals to Memphis East) and 9-3 his freshman season.

He lettered three times in basketball, as he earned first-team all-region (11-5A) honors at power forward his junior year, averaging 13 points, eight rebounds and three assists a game. He has lettered once in track (sprints and hurdles).

ACADEMICS—He is interested in psychology as his major at Colorado. He is a member of the Nashville chapter Jack & Jill Inc., which is a leadership group for local high school students.

VITALS—Has 4.4 speed in the 40 and bench presses 300 pounds.

RECRUITING—He selected Colorado over Memphis, Michigan State, Kentucky and Tennessee.

PERSONAL—He was born March 2, 1985 in Nashville, Tenn. His hobbies include bowling, golf, lifting weights and volunteering. He belongs to his church's youth group, where his father serves as pastor, and traveled to South Africa in 2001 to volunteer at an orphanage. Acted in several commercials at age 9, with the most notable a "Miss Goldie's Chicken" ad and a junior golf spot. He was also in the cable TV movie Proud Heart with actress/singer Lori Morgan. He has known teammate and fellow CU recruit Chris Russell since age 11; and CU basketball center David Harrison (from Nashville's Brentwood Academy) since 1998. His father (Edwin) played fullback at Connecticut Wesleyan in 1965, while his great grandfather played hockey and was the first African American to play collegiate lacrosse at Springfield (Mass.) College during the early 1900s.

DUSTY SPRAGUE WR, 6-4, 180, Fr., HS, Holyoke, Colo.

HIGH SCHOOL—Many have referred to him as the best small school athlete in the state of Colorado for 2002-03. As a senior, he earned both first-team all-Colorado (all classes) and all-state (1A) at defensive back from both the Denver Post and Rocky Mountain News. He was the LPAA (Lower Platte Athletic Association) player of the year (he was all-league at quarterback and free safety), and the state of Colorado's winner and representative for the Wendy's High School Heisman. SuperPrep named him to its All-America team (listing him as the No. 30 receiver nationally), while PrepStar and Prep Football Report tabbed him as an all-Midlands selection. SuperPrep rated him as the No. 24 player in the Midlands, and the third performer in the "athlete" category, while PFR ranked him No. 44 in the region (the sixth receiver). Rivals.com ranked him as the No. 37 receiver in the nation and as the fifth overall best player in Colorado.

As a junior, he earned all-state honors at free safety and all-conference honors at running back, wide receiver, free safety and kick returner, and as a sophomore, he earned all-league honors at wide receiver. His senior year he rushed for 1,340 yards and 25 touchdowns, with a long run of 85 yards, threw for 756 yards, had over 200 yards receiving, and racked up 869 kickoff and 480 punt return yards.

On defense (free safety), he had 127 tackles (61 solo), with two interceptions, 12 passes broken up and three quarterback sacks. Top career games included two from his senior year: in a 48-0 win over Jefferson Academy, he rushed 17 times for 180 yards and five touchdowns, along with returning a punt 70 yards; and in a win over Academy of Charter, he had 19 carries for 191 yards and four score, while completing 7-of-10 passes for 115 yards and two TDs (and did not play in the fourth quarter). Holyoke was 8-3 his senior season and 7-5 his junior season under coach Adam Archibeque, reaching the state playoffs both years.

He also lettered four times in track (a state champion in the 110-and 300-meter hurdles and the long jump as a junior) and four times in basketball (guard; an honorable mention all-state performer).

ACADEMICS—He is interested in business as his major at Colorado. He is third in his high school class (41 in size) with a 4.068 grade point average. The president of the National Honor Society at Holyoke and class treasurer, he is a member of the Science, Cadenza, Spanish and Drama Clubs, while also being involved with the FCCLA (Family Career and Community Leaders of America), FBLA (Future Business Leaders of America), FCA and the El Pomar Youth Community Service groups.

He was a member Holyoke's Knowledge Bowl championship team while participating in Northeastern Junior College's Math and Science competition, and also ranked as the school's outstanding student in math, science and Spanish classes.

VITALS—Has 4.5 speed in the 40 and bench presses 225 pounds.

RECRUITING—He selected Colorado over Washington, Colorado State, Nebraska and Oregon.

PERSONAL—He was born Aug. 9, 1984 in Holyoke, Colo. His hobbies include acting, fishing, reading and an interest in television production. Two brothers (Aaron, Russell) both played college football at Colorado State, with Aaron likely headed for NFL Europe this spring. TERRY WASHINGTON RB, 5-11, 185, Fr., HS, St. Louis, Mo. (Cleveland)

HIGH SCHOOL—As a senior, he earned all-Midlands honors from both Prep Football Report and SuperPrep, as PFR ranked him as the No. 30 player in the region (and the fifth running back). He also earned first-team all-South, all-state, all-metro and all-Public High League honors, while being presented with the Demetrius Johnson athlete of the year award. As a junior, he earned all-South, all-metro and all-league honors.

A three-year starter at tailback and kickoff return man, as a senior he rushed for 2,230 yards and 27 touchdowns, averaging just over 10 yards per carry. He also caught 20 passes for 260 yards and returned four kickoffs for touchdowns, owning an average of better than 40 yards per return. He rushed for 1,300 yards and 16 touchdowns as a junior, and gained 1,100 while scoring 13 times as a sophomore. He was a three-year starter on defense as well, registering 87 tackles as a senior at cornerback, when he had three interceptions, six pass deflections, two forced fumbles and five recoveries. He split time at corner and free safety, racking up 103 tackles, three interceptions and five PBU's.

Top games his senior year came against Ozark, when he rushed for a career-high 303 yards and four touchdowns, with 358 all-purpose yards including 55 receiving.

Against Northeast (Arma, Kansas), he rushed for 284 yards and four scores. Cleveland was 8-3 his sophomore through senior seasons, winning the Public High League title all three seasons, but falling in the first round of the playoffs all three times as well. He also lettered three times in basketball (averaging seven points and eight assists per game as a senior) and in track (sprints and relays, with bests of 10.7 in the 100 and 22.0 in the 200).

ACADEMICS—He is interested in business administration or management as possible majors at Colorado. An honor roll student in high school.

VITALS—Has 4.4 speed in the 40, 10.7 in the 100 and bench presses 245 pounds.

RECRUITING—He selected Colorado over Indiana, Iowa and Arkansas.

PERSONAL—He was born Dec. 18, 1984 in St. Louis, Mo. His hobbies include movies and spending time with friends. He has done quite a bit of school service, going to shelters to distribute food, clothing and toys.

BRIAN WHITE QB, 6-5, 220, Fr., HS, Mission Viejo, Calif. (Trabuco Hills)

HIGH SCHOOL—As a senior, he earned PrepStar All-American honors, as was also named to its all-West team. He garnered SuperPrep all-Far-West honors as the 48th overall player and No. 8 quarterback, while Prep Football Report named him to its all-West team as the No. 39 player in California and No. 10 quarterback. Rivals.com tabbed him the No. 21 quarterback in the nation (and the No. 69 player in California) on his way to earning all-CIF (southern section) and all-South Coast League accolades. He was an honorable mention all-league performer during both his junior and sophomore seasons. As a senior, he completed 160-of-265 passes (60 percent) for 2,006 yards and 16 touchdowns (he had 11 interceptions). He also rushed 60 times for 225 yards and three scores with a long run of 47 yards, and caught one pass for an 8-yard touchdown on a trick play.

As a junior, he completed 118-of-205 passes for 1,500 yards and 10 touchdowns, with just five interceptions. He also ran for 120 yards and three touchdowns. In limited action as a sophomore, he completed 56 percent of his passes (70-of-125), throwing for 900 yards and eight scores, adding 100 yards on the ground and one TD. Top career games all came during his senior year, including a 41-19 win over Laguna Hills when he passed for 280 yards and four touchdowns on 17-of-22 attempts. Just two weeks later in a 35-14 win against Aliso Niguel, he completed 18-of-30 passes for 336 yards and three touchdowns. In his team's final game of the season, a first round playoff loss to Claremont, he completed 13-of-21 passes for 200 yards and three scores. Trabuco Hills was 6-5 his senior year (losing to Claremont in the first round), 5-5 his junior year (losing in the first round) and 2-8 his sophomore season under coach Bill Crow.

He lettered three times in basketball (averaging 15 points, eight rebounds, four assists and two blocks per game as a senior), once in track (high jump;: a career best of 6-0) and played baseball as a freshman.

ACADEMICS—He is interested in business (marketing) as his major at Colorado. He was named Trabuco Hills' Student of the Month during November 2002, and is also a member of his school's medical science program.

VITALS—Has 4.7 speed in the 40 and bench presses 315 pounds.

RECRUITING—He selected Colorado over Ohio State, Arizona, Oregon, Washington, Arizona State and Louisville.

PERSONAL—He was born Sept. 20, 1984 in Cleveland, Ohio. His hobbies include bass fishing, playing video games and surfing. Grandfather (Ralph) played offensive line at Bowling Green and for the Baltimore Colts during the 1960s; and father (Mark) was a linebacker for Bowling Green from 1980-84.


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