Quick Take

<b>Eric Moore</b> speaks in soft, measured tones. He's not into preseason hype or bandbox leaders. Moore is more interested in results than promises. The 6-foot-4, 250-pound Moore is doing his part, usually arriving early for Florida State's summer workouts and staying late. "We need to get the pass-rush back to where it used to be," Moore said. Click here for all the details.

Eric Moore speaks in soft, measured tones. He's not into preseason hype or bandbox leaders. Moore is more interested in results than promises.

"You really can't think of the hype about what teams are going to do this or where you are at (preseason standings) -- everybody is going to get that," Moore said.

"What we need to be concentrating on right now is getting better as a team. Getting better as players. I am not the type of guy who is going to do too much talking or getting up in a player's face. The coaches do that and I don't think you respond well when a teammate does that. You have to want to get better and that's what we are trying to do this summer."

The 6-foot-4, 250-pound Moore is doing his part, usually arriving early for Florida State's summer workouts and staying late. He mingles easily with teammates and appears focused during drills. Moore emerged as one of the Seminoles' most effective pass rushers last season despite health issues.

Moore had his appendix removed in emergency surgery prior to the FSU-Miami game. Moore missed three games -- UM, Notre Dame and Wake Forest -- in addition to needed pounds and strength.

Still, FSU fans saw enough of Moore to realize his potential.

Playing behind Kevin Emanuel at left defensive end, Moore saw action in nine regular-season games. He turned in his best performance against North Carolina State, finishing with five tackles.

Moore, a junior from Pahokee, tied for fourth on the team with linebacker Kendyll Pope with 10 tackles for loss and third on the team with three sacks. Moore's best attribute just might be his athleticism. He finished the season with seven quarterback hurries, a pass breakup, two forced fumbles and a fumble recovery.

Despite his effort, Moore realizes he needs to improve.

"Right now I am trying to get stronger and faster and I am still trying to learn all the things the older players can do," Moore said.

"I am concentrating on my hand placement, improving my technique and coming off the ball quicker. We need to get the pass-rush back to where it used to be. The hardest part, as a younger player, is the scheme in terms of getting to where you need to be every play. Once you get the plays down, you let your talent take over."

Most agree talent should not be an issue for the Seminoles this season.

Replacing All-ACC defensive end Alonzo Jackson's team-leading 13 sacks and 19 quarterback hurries presents the most significant challenge. A solid interior push should provide ample opportunities for Emanuel, Moore and newcomer Chauncy Davis to get after opposing quarterbacks. FSU's defense has surrendered 362 yards and 23.5 points per game over the past two years.

When asked if those numbers were too high by FSU's standards, Moore didn't hesitate, saying, "that's high for everybody's standards. We need to give up less points and less yardage."

While the Atlantic Coast Conference is stronger than ever, Moore says the Seminoles are capable of delivering another title. Where they fit on the national stage, however, will be determined by a brutal non-conference schedule that includes home dates against Colorado and Miami and road showdowns at Notre Dame and Florida.

At the moment, however, such chatter means little to Moore. As June rolls into July, Moore says the Seminoles' thoughts need to be on themselves.

"We are just getting back together as a team, seeing everybody again and getting to know the younger guys and teaching them what's going on and what's expected of them," Moore said. "It's easy right now -- we have to get better as a team. That's the goal."


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