Athlete Update

Seventy-six games in 79 days. Twelve-hour bus rides -- one way. Plenty of fast-food. A lavish lifestyle, right? Former FSU pitcher Trent Peterson certainly didn't mind. He recently returned home from Vancouver, Canada, home to the Oakland A's Class A minor-league team (Canadians). Peterson, one of eight Seminoles selected in the major-league amateur draft last June, said he thoroughly enjoyed the experience. "You want to win and all that, but the atmosphere it just different," he said.

Seventy-six games in 79 days. Twelve-hour bus rides -- one way. Plenty of fast-food.

A lavish lifestyle, right?

Former Florida State pitching standout Trent Peterson certainly didn't mind. He recently returned home from Vancouver, Canada, home to the Oakland A's Class A minor-league team (Canadians).

Peterson, one of eight Seminoles selected in the major-league amateur draft last June, said he thoroughly enjoyed the experience. A fifth-round selection (152nd overall) of the A's, Peterson was designated to the organization's short-season team.

A chuckling Peterson, however, said there was nothing short about his trek beyond the border.

"I waited around for about a week once I got there until everything cleared," Peterson told TheTerritory Tuesday.

"Once I started throwing, though it was a lot. I didn't think I would be throwing that much. I am definitely looking for some time off. My arm is tired."

Peterson, a former standout at Florida High, is currently enrolled at FSU this semester (15 hours). Former Seminole teammates who also returned to school from their first season in the minors as well include Tony Richie and Tony McQuade.

While the Canadians finished 35-41, Peterson was solid.

The crafty left-hander finished 3-4 with a 3.33 earned-run average, surrendering 24 earned runs in 54 innings. Two of his better outings included nine strikeouts in four innings and one earned run in another eight-inning performance. The Canadians employed four- and five-man rotations.

"I started out in relief when I first got there, throwing a couple of innings here and there," Peterson said.

"But once people started moving around, I pretty much started every fourth day. You were on a pitch count -- 75 pitches every fourth day or 80 to 100 pitches every fifth day -- but it was tiring. That took a toll on your arm."

Peterson admitted the atmosphere between collegiate and professional baseball, at least on the minor-league level, is very different.

"It's more pressure on yourself," Peterson said.

"The whole team thing is a little different. You want to win and all that, but the atmosphere it just different. Everything seems to be a little more laid back than college. It was different, though the actual playing of the game wasn't a really big deal. We got pretty big crowds. Baseball is baseball, I guess it doesn't matter where you are playing."

Peterson enjoyed his stint in Canada, living with a host family in Vancouver. He tried to remain in touch with family and friends but "I had to be careful because I didn't want to run up by cell phone bill, especially calling from Canada." He also faced off twice against McQuade and "I am pretty sure he didn't get a hit off me."

Of course, Peterson initially wondered if he did the right thing by signing following his junior season with the Seminoles.

Peterson developed into the team's ace, carrying a 10-1 record with a 2.68 ERA and a team-high 109 strikeouts into the Super Regional against Texas. The Longhorns, however, swept the Seminoles in two games to reach the College World Series.

"I was real happy with it (decision)," Peterson said.

"You first get up there you kind of start second-guessing yourself. After awhile, I felt like it was the right thing to do. I was happy with it."

Peterson has stopped by to chat with Seminole coaches as well as his former teammates since his return. But this is a different FSU squad, one built on youth and new faces. Peterson even needed a program.

"I stopped by but I only know a few of the guys," Peterson said. "My freshman class, we are all gone, except for two -- Drew and Zech. It's different. Once they start practicing, though, I will probably want to be out there with them."

Peterson also said he wasn't surprised by the news that Marc LaMacchia's had signed with the Texas Rangers. LaMacchia, expected to be the Seminoles' ace next season after returning from elbow surgery, inked a deal on the first day of class last month.

"You could see why he signed," Peterson said.

"He got a decent offer. I probably would have done the same thing. I guess you never know what's going to happen next year, as far as rehab. He has to go through rehab and next year is a question. You don't know if you will get that kind of money after your senior year or not."

Peterson, of course, decided to embark on his dream -- to play professional baseball. His first season has left a lasting impression.

Welcome to the minor leagues.

"All I know is I am worn out," Peterson said and laughed.


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