Because of the Coaches, Players, and Fans

Cordale Scott's verbal commitment to Illinois head coach, Ron Zook, another major recruiting coup. The Ohio native was down to two schools, the Illini and the home-state Buckeyes. Today I caught up with Scott. Read here at InsideIllini.com about his decision-making process.

Cordale Scott is a 6-foot-3, 200-pound wide receiver/athlete from Cleveland, OH who is listed here at Scout.com as a four-star recruit with 4.5 speed. Last weekend Scott visited Illinois and came away thoroughly impressed. "My mom and I loved everything about Illinois on my visit. The coaches, players, and fans were all great to us and we liked it all," said Scott.

"I know a lot of people around here [Cleveland] were probably upset or don't understand why I picked Illinois over OSU, but I had to do what was the best for me and my future. Don't get me wrong, when I visited Ohio State they were great to me, too. But I just know I should be at Illinois," he added.

Scott's final two schools were Illinois and Ohio State. It has been years since Illinois has been able to go up against the "Big Boys" for recruits and win. Now they're on the list and landing the kind of players Zook said he would land when he took the job: players with speed and more speed.

Scott is a great athlete and will play a big role when he gets on the field, wherever that may be. "I'm not sure where I'll play. Coach Zook didn't promise me one thing, he just said if I play hard I'll have a chance to show what I can do. I would like to play receiver, but we'll just see when I get down there in June," stated Scott.

The Illini's 28-21 win over the Buckeyes, back in November, wasn't the deciding factor for Scott, but that Illinois victory helped Scott realize the Illini were going to be a team that challenged for Big Ten and National titles for years to come. With the help of talented recruits like Scott, those days seem more and more likely.

Keep it tuned to InsideIllini.com as we will have more interviews with the Illini's other recent verbal commitments.


Illini Inquirer Top Stories