On Campus - A Season in the Books

With the Big 12 Track and Field Championships in the books, the 2005-2006 Cyclone athletic year is officially complete. Iowa State competed in 16 of the 19 sanctioned Big 12 sports this year; the exceptions being Baseball, Men's Tennis, and Men's Swimming and Diving. How did the department perform compared to the rest of the conference? Let's break it down.

With the Big 12 Track and Field Championships in the books, the 2005-2006 Cyclone athletic year is officially complete. Iowa State competed in 16 of the 19 sanctioned Big 12 sports this year; the exceptions being Baseball, Men's Tennis, and Men's Swimming and Diving. How did the department perform compared to the rest of the conference? Let's break it down.

 

In order to evaluate the schools, I numbered their finishing positions in each of their respective sports. For example Iowa State finished first in gymnastics so they received a 1 for that sport and they finished last in women's tennis so they received a 12 there. If schools don't have a respective sport they would receive the highest possible point total for that sport. For instance, since there are only five wrestling programs in the Big 12, the rest of the schools that didn't compete would receive a 6. For baseball, I calculated the numbers as of the end of the regular season standings. The Big 12 tourney is this weekend. Interestingly, no school competes in all 19 Big 12 sports. It isn't a perfect system, but it gives a good indication of where the Cyclones stand in the conference. I apologize if I'm making this more confusing than a Marty Fine analogy.

 

First let's take a look at Iowa State's performance:

 

Football (7) Men's BBall (10) Women's BBall (8) Volleyball (7 of 11) Women's Tennis (12)  Women's Swimming& Diving (6 of 6) Softball (9 of 10) Soccer (3 of 11) Gymnastics (1 of 4) Men's Track (11) Women's Track (12) Men's Golf (12) Women's Golf (8) Women's Cross Country (9) Men's Cross Country (6) Wrestling (4 of 5)

 

Iowa State finished in the upper half of the conference in three sports out of 16.

 

Texas, on the other hand, came in with as the kids say these days, a flat-out banging year.

 

Football (1) Men's BBall (1) Women's BBall (9) Baseball (1)  Men's Swimming (1) Men's Tennis (1) Volleyball (2) Women's Tennis (2) Women's Swimming (1) Softball (1) Soccer (3) Men's Track (1) Women's Track (1) Women's Golf (7) Men's Golf (2) Women's Cross Country (11) Men's CC (2)

 

The Longhorns finished first in 9 of the 17 sports they were active in. The only sports in which ISU and Texas went head to head and the Cyclones came out on top were Women's Basketball and Women's Cross Country. They tied in soccer, but Texas won in their match-up in the tournament.

 

Here are the final totals for all of the schools; the number of sports each competes in are in parentheses.

 

  1. Texas (17)              58
  2. Nebraska (18)          83
  3. Texas A&M (17)        84
  4. Colorado (13)           113
  5. Baylor (16)              116
  6. Oklahoma (17)          116
  7.  Mizzou (18)            123
  8. Oklahoma State (15) 124
  9.  Kansas (15)            126
  10.  Texas Tech (15)      131
  11.  Iowa State (16)      142
  12.  Kansas State (14)    153

 

 

Although Iowa State has the sixth highest number of competing sports, they finished eleventh in the total standings. If you break it down further to see the total points relative to the number of sports, Iowa State emerges in worse shape.

 

Formula: Total Points*(.Number of Sports) = Value per Sport

 

1. Texas             9.86

2. Texas A&M      14.28

3. Colorado         14.69

4. Nebraska        14.94

5. Baylor            18.56

6. Okie State      18.60

7. Kansas           18.90

8. Texas Tech     19.65

9. Oklahoma        19.72

10. Kansas State 21.42

11. Mizzou           22.14

12. Iowa State    22.72

 

It may have been a historical year for the likes of gymnastics, soccer, and volleyball, but the athletic program has a ways to go both monetarily and on the playing surface. It can be done. And it started with a change at the top.

 

Jamie Pollard has already done a much-improved job of raising finances; let's hope that success relates to game-performance in 2006-2007.


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