Indiana QB To Visit Iowa This Weekend

<p>The Iowa Hawkeyes have their eyes on several quarterbacks for the class of 2005, but one name that you might want to pay close attention to is that of Dustin Sherer of Arcadia, Indiana. The 6-foot-4, 205-pound signal caller will be making his way to Iowa City on Saturday, May 15th, to take part in Iowa's Junior Day, and he will also be attending the Nike Camp on Sunday in Iowa City. We recently spoke with his high school coach to introduce Iowa fans to Sherer.

The Iowa Hawkeyes have their eyes on several quarterbacks for the class of 2005, but one name that you might want to pay close attention to is that of Dustin Sherer of Arcadia, Indiana.

The 6-foot-4, 205-pound signal caller will be making his way to Iowa City on Saturday, May 15th, to take part in Iowa's Junior Day, and he will also be attending the Nike Camp on Sunday in Iowa City.

We recently spoke with Sherer's coach Steve Stirn to get his thoughts on his star player who has offers from Illinois and Indiana, with a possible offer from Iowa coming this weekend.

Q: What type of a quarterback is Dustin?

"He is more of your pro style quarterback. He is a drop back guy first, that is how we use him, but you can put an asterisk by that. He has an outstanding ability to run, but I don't think that he falls in the category where he is an athlete that can throw the ball. He is a passer and game manager first. He also has some very good physical skills."

Q: Do you know if Iowa has offered him a scholarship?

"Well, it is not official, but I think they want to get him on campus and then make that formal offer. They have not had that opportunity yet. All indications are that they are going to."

"It's safe to say right now that Iowa is seriously interested, as are Michigan, Notre Dame, Ohio State, Wisconsin, Miami of Ohio, Western Michigan and Kentucky."

Q: What is it about him that is attracting this much attention from some big name suitors?

"He has the physical talent…he has a unique blend of the physical talent, and he has the emotional package and poise, along with intelligence. On the emotional side, he has the competitiveness and leadership qualities to where you look at him from a distance; you notice all of those things. He has it all. All of the great ones do. Then you look closer, and the closer you look, you are not disappointed. He really does not have a glaring weakness as a quarterback. I think that puts him in an elite group."

"He is probably a once in a lifetime player for me, so my perspective is skewed towards him. I just think that he has the total package, and does all things well."

Q: What type of offense do you run?

"We base ourselves out of a two back offense. His progression here as a quarterback has been as such that as a sophomore, we needed him to not be the hub of the wheel, rather a strong spoke. We had a good team around him, he was young and it was critical that he learn to manage the game and not give up the ball. That helped his progression, because he learned to play within himself. Now, the offense has evolved because of him, but we have not changed philosophically. He is asked to make decisions at the line of scrimmage within the running game and occasional run/pass decisions. Our passing game has been influenced most by the west coast style. But we will still stretch the field than a pure west coast team will. We run a lot of play action and waggle."

Q: Do you see that type of offense best suited for him at the next level?

"I think so. At the same time, I think he has enough talent that warrants serious consideration from everyone. He can be taught. The thing that a school such as Iowa offers, and I think Michigan and Wisconsin, is that they like to run the ball, too. They are not heavy to the pass. They can project him and see him doing things in our films that they would ask him to do, so it has helped their evaluation process, versus a team that might run the spread. We don't ask him to do those types of things."

"I think he understands that you need a strong running game, because that is the exact system that he is in right now. He has had the role as a young guy with two senior running backs returning, and he knew that he was their helper. He enters his senior year with a good young running back, and he knows that he needs that guy's help. We have spent a lot of time coaching off the field with him, watching film and developing his mental side. One of the first things we discuss each year is what must a quarterback be able to do?"

"Throwing the ball is just a portion of it. Some young kids have a tendency to focus too much on throwing the ball. Granted, there are different types of passes, different set ups, on the move, shotgun, etc. But handing the ball off and making running game decisions at the line of scrimmage via audibles are equally important to the overall success of a team that wants to be balanced. He has those skills."

"I don't think any high school kid comes out ready to do those things as a freshman, but I think he leaves here with an understanding of ‘I am going to do the same thing in college, just to a higher degree.' They are not going to ask him to do something completely new. And I think that makes him maybe more ‘projectable'. In no way is he a product of our system. He is a quarterback that has made our system better, and I think that due to our threat to run the ball, it helps him in the passing game."

"He is the best option quarterback I have ever had, but you don't see that in the game much any more at the college level, but he can do that. He is just a player that can handle a lot of things."


Hawkeye Insider Top Stories