6th year Medical Redshirt

Further study will be made of the NCAA rulebook, but the hope is that Kansas State can get a sixth season for at least one of its injured Wildcats.

Sidelined for the majority of the year, if not the entire season, are tight end Thomas Hill and defensive lineman Andrew Bulman.

According to a relatively new NCAA rule, athletes can petition for a sixth season if they have an incapacitating injury or illness in two different seasons.

At Kansas State, that has been the case with Eric Hickson, Thomas Barnett, Eric Everley and Brandon Clark in the last six years.

Kansas State compliance director Eric Harper said that in Hill's case, an extra year might be granted because the Tulsa, Okla., native entered school in 1999 as a partial qualifier. In that case, the student-athlete can only play three seasons unless he graduates in four years. If that is accomplished, which Hill did, the student-athlete is granted a fourth year of eligibility.

This was to be that year for Hill until a preseason injury put his right leg in a cast. Coach Bill Snyder has indicated that it would be late in the year before Hill, or Bulman, would return, if at all.

''It's the hope that the NCAA will give this year back to Thomas,'' Harper said, ''but we're not sure and this type of petition is not filed until after the season.''

Bulman, whose left leg is in a cast, was also injured in the preseason. The possibility of an extra year for the Milton, Mass., native would appear to be less than for Hill.

Bulman spent two seasons at Syracuse in 1999 and 2000, and then attended L.A. Valley College in 2001, before his arrival at Kansas State in 2002 when he played in nine games.

If either athlete would play in just one snap of a game starting with the Colorado game on Oct. 18, he would not be eligible for the sixth season.

Should the injury to Ell Roberson be more serious than now believed, the Kansas State quarterback would also not be eligible for a medical hardship ruling this year, or a sixth season in 2004.

For a medical hardship, an athlete must not have played in more than two contests, or 20 percent of the institution's scheduled contests, whichever number is highest. In addition, the incapacitating injury or illness must be prior to the completion of the first half of the playing season.

In a normal football season, that is two games. In basketball, it's normally five or six games depending on a team's postseason opportunities. Further study will be made of the NCAA rulebook, but the hope is that Kansas State can get a sixth season for at least one of its injured Wildcats.

Sidelined for the majority of the year, if not the entire season, are tight end Thomas Hill and defensive lineman Andrew Bulman. According to a relatively new NCAA rule, athletes can petition for a sixth season if they have an incapacitating injury or illness in two different seasons.

At Kansas State, that has been the case with Eric Hickson, Thomas Barnett, Eric Everley and Brandon Clark in the last six years. Kansas State compliance director Eric Harper said that in Hill's case, an extra year might be granted because the Tulsa, Okla., native entered school in 1999 as a partial qualifier.

In that case, the student-athlete can only play three seasons unless he graduates in four years. If that is accomplished, which Hill did, the student-athlete is granted a fourth year of eligibility. This was to be that year for Hill until a preseason injury put his right leg in a cast. Coach Bill Snyder has indicated that it would be late in the year before Hill, or Bulman, would return, if at all.

''It's the hope that the NCAA will give this year back to Thomas,'' Harper said, ''but we're not sure and this type of petition is not filed until after the season.'' Bulman, whose left leg is in a cast, was also injured in the preseason. The possibility of an extra year for the Milton, Mass., native would appear to be less than for Hill.

Bulman spent two seasons at Syracuse in 1999 and 2000, and then attended L.A. Valley College in 2001, before his arrival at Kansas State in 2002 when he played in nine games. If either athlete would play in just one snap of a game starting with the Colorado game on Oct. 18, he would not be eligible for the sixth season.

Should the injury to Ell Roberson be more serious than now believed, the Kansas State quarterback would also not be eligible for a medical hardship ruling this year, or a sixth season in 2004.

For a medical hardship, an athlete must not have played in more than two contests, or 20 percent of the institution's scheduled contests, whichever number is highest. In addition, the incapacitating injury or illness must be prior to the completion of the first half of the playing season.

In a normal football season, that is two games. In basketball, it's normally five or six games depending on a team's postseason opportunities. Further study will be made of the NCAA rulebook, but the hope is that Kansas State can get a sixth season for at least one of its injured Wildcats.

Sidelined for the majority of the year, if not the entire season, are tight end Thomas Hill and defensive lineman Andrew Bulman. According to a relatively new NCAA rule, athletes can petition for a sixth season if they have an incapacitating injury or illness in two different seasons.

At Kansas State, that has been the case with Eric Hickson, Thomas Barnett, Eric Everley and Brandon Clark in the last six years. Kansas State compliance director Eric Harper said that in Hill's case, an extra year might be granted because the Tulsa, Okla., native entered school in 1999 as a partial qualifier.

In that case, the student-athlete can only play three seasons unless he graduates in four years. If that is accomplished, which Hill did, the student-athlete is granted a fourth year of eligibility. This was to be that year for Hill until a preseason injury put his right leg in a cast. Coach Bill Snyder has indicated that it would be late in the year before Hill, or Bulman, would return, if at all.

''It's the hope that the NCAA will give this year back to Thomas,'' Harper said, ''but we're not sure and this type of petition is not filed until after the season.'' Bulman, whose left leg is in a cast, was also injured in the preseason. The possibility of an extra year for the Milton, Mass., native would appear to be less than for Hill.

Bulman spent two seasons at Syracuse in 1999 and 2000, and then attended L.A. Valley College in 2001, before his arrival at Kansas State in 2002 when he played in nine games. If either athlete would play in just one snap of a game starting with the Colorado game on Oct. 18, he would not be eligible for the sixth season. Should the injury to Ell Roberson be more serious than now believed, the Kansas State quarterback would also not be eligible for a medical hardship ruling this year, or a sixth season in 2004.

For a medical hardship, an athlete must not have played in more than two contests, or 20 percent of the institution's scheduled contests, whichever number is highest. In addition, the incapacitating injury or illness must be prior to the completion of the first half of the playing season. In a normal football season, that is two games. In basketball, it's normally five or six games depending on a team's postseason opportunities.

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