Davis Won't Be A Wildcat

One can probably forget about defensive standout D.J. Davis attending Kansas State. The highly touted three-star cornerback hasn't heard from the Wildcats for months and has since added Big 12 rival Missouri to his final list of three.

One can probably forget about defensive standout D.J. Davis attending Kansas State. The highly touted three-star cornerback hasn't heard from the Wildcats for months and has since added Big 12 rival Missouri to his final list of three.

Davis, the No. 18 corner from Fort Worth, Texas is finished hearing the pitches, doing interviews, and scheduling in-home visits. In addition to the Tigers, his final three include Texas A&M and Penn State. Davis, who is 5-foot-11 190 pounds, is taking the holidays to evaluate his options with his family and then make his decision known to everyone at halftime of the U.S. Army All-American Bowl Jan. 3 on NBC.

Davis' father, Robert is handling media and coaches requests for his son at this time.

Davis said the Wildcats were in the running early and even stayed in up to just three weeks ago. But in his opinion, K-State faded "real fast and hard" after not hearing from offensive coordinator Greg Peterson since last spring.

"We really liked Kansas State a lot," he said. "Last spring we had an in-home visit with (Bill) Snyder and Peterson when they were down here visiting others. We were really impressed with that. I just don't know what happened in the end."

But Davis said he kept urging his son to keep the Wildcats in the picture, despite the lack of contact. But at the same time, Davis told his son that he'd know who was interested in him and the college should always make the first move. The last time the Davis family heard from K-State was in July.

"Without question K-State was in the top five," he said. "But at this point we have it all figured out and will announce the decision at halftime of the All-American game. But there was a time where we liked everything about K-State. They got some players up there. I've followed college football for a long time and they always have great players come from their program. It's too bad we couldn't get a visit set up with them."

But one aspect that was covered when both parties were still communicating was the issue of K-State heavily recruiting junior college prospects. Davis was concerned that the K-State coaching staff didn't develop talent and relied too much on JUCO players.

"I asked Peterson about that and he was very upfront with me," he said. "It was a legitimate concern and he addressed it fully. It's just something you think about when you see how many they recruit."


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