UK seeks to win 2nd in a row over Carolina

The Kentucky Wildcats face North Carolina for the 35th time dating back to 1924. While the Heels own a 22-12 all-time edge over UK, the Cats have won two of the last three games, including their last meeting, a 76-69 win in last year's NCAA Tournament en route to their final four appearance.

The Kentucky Wildcats face North Carolina for the 35th time dating back to 1924. While the Heels own a 22-12 all-time edge over UK, the Cats have won two of the last three games, including their last meeting, a 76-69 win in last year's NCAA Tournament en route to their final four appearance.

UK-UNC fun facts:

While Kentucky has faced UNC three times while the Heels have been ranked number one in the nation, the two teams have never met while UK was ranked #1. On Saturday, that will change.

Michael Jordan only played against Kentucky once, in 1981. The #1 Heels beat the #2 Cats 82-69. James Worthy scored 26 to lead UNC. Sam Perkins chipped in 21 and Jordan added 19. Charles hurt paced the cats with 18 point and 10 rebounds.

Since the year 2000, the Cats are 6-6 against the Heels.

Carolina has won two fo the last three meetings in Rupp, though the Cats won the last meet, a 68-66 win in John Calipari's first year as UK's coach. Patrick Patterson paced the Cats with 19 points. John Wall added 16.

An interesting note from Jon Scott's website on the rivalry between UK and UNC:

Some may not know that both UK and UNC were at one time part of the mega-agglomeration known as the Southern Conference. While the Southern Conference still remains today, it looks nothing like it did at one point in the 1920's. At that time, the league members spanned from Maryland to Louisiana and included nearly all of the major southern schools, many which today make up the ACC and the SEC conferences. Thirty-three schools were members of the SIAA at one point. The league was so large that the teams didn't necessarily play each other in the regular conference schedule. It was especially difficult, in those days before air travel was commonplace, to traverse the mountains between the Atlantic Coast and places like Lexington, Kentucky. The coastal teams tended to compete with each other, while teams like Kentucky, Vanderbilt and Tennessee honed their own rivalries and the teams of the deep south stayed in that region (and with the exception of a few places like Alabama and LSU, largely ignored the sport of basketball in sole deference to football).


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