Calipari style exciting for superior athletes

The innovator of the original Dribble-Drive appears to have been Vance Walberg of Fresno City College (who later used it at Pepperdine). He referred to it as the "AASAA" offense (attack, attack, skip, attack, attack). John Calipari was one of the first to popularize the offense.

"John Calipari is going to succeed in a major way at Kentucky for a couple of reasons," said one well-established AAU Coach by phone today. "Everyone knows he is an incredible recruiter," the coach continued, "but he also plays an exciting brand of basketball that kids in high school love and perceive will get them to the NBA and this is one reason he is going to get the really great players."

The coach, who did not want to be identified by name, indicated that Calipari's Dribble-Drive motion Offense is exciting to watch but even more exciting for gifted athletes to play, "You have to have the right players to make it work," the coach said, "otherwise it will backfire on you. Dribble-penetration from the guards is the key, and dribble-penetration is one of the most difficult things for a defense to stop. Plus the offense causes defenses to pick up a lot of cheap fouls."

The innovator of the original Dribble-Drive appears to have been Vance Walberg of Fresno City College (who later used it at Pepperdine). He referred to it as the "AASAA" offense (attack, attack, skip, attack, attack). John Calipari was one of the first to popularize the offense, though he took it to a new level by modifying and renaming it the "dribble-drive motion offense."

"It's an offense where the guards spread the floor and dribble-penetration to the basket for lay-ups or kick-outs for the spot three-point shooters," said the AAU coach. "It's exciting to watch and the big-time athletes that have played it love it. The big guys like it too because they do not have to post-up, but play on the opposite block. The big guys look for lobs or dump passes from penetrating perimeter players, the spread on the floor leaves lanes for them to get point on follow-ups with offensive rebounding."

"What it all comes down to," the coach added, "is that this system allows superior athletes to dominate their opponents. That's why the 5-star athlete loves to play in the system. DeAndre Liggins will flourish in this system."

One of the questions Calipari will have to answer is whether his current players have the ability to run this system effectively. "You have to have four perimeter players with outstanding ball-handling ability that can attack the basket and finish. You must also have players who can catch-and-shoot the 3-point shot effectively from the kick-out when that happens," the coach said. "This is where the biggest question marks are today for Kentucky. Coach Calipari may have to make some tough decisions in order to make room for talent that can really execute this offense."


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