Stevenson plays way into rotation

Midway of the second half of Kentucky's first exhibition game, it looked like Perry Stevenson was in John Calipari's nowhere land.

Midway of the second half of Kentucky's first exhibition game, it looked like Perry Stevenson was in John Calipari's nowhere land.

The new UK coach had kept the returning starter on the bench against Campbellsville and it looked like those who thought Stevenson might lack the skills to play in the dribble-drive offense were right.

Then Stevenson got in the game, scored 11 quick points and attacked the basket. He played more against Clarion, played well again and Calipari announced after the game that Stevenson was now clearly Patrick Patterson's backup.

"It definitely sounds good. I might be able to get up more 3's now. I felt like I had another chance to prove I want to be in there and help the team win," Stevenson said after the Clarion game.

So why does he play best when it looks the toughest for him much like he did two years ago when Patrick Patterson was hurt?

"That word can't. I don't know if I like it. I don't like it being thrown my direction," Stevenson said. "I believe I can play well. I just like to show the criticism is wrong."

Senior teammate Ramon Harris has his own theory about why Stevenson sometimes plays his best just when it looks like he won't produce.

"You can't listen to what other people tell you. If they tell you that you can't do something, why can't you. It is what it is. You can't listen to all the negative things that people say you can't do. Coach will determine what you can do. Perry has to learn that," Harris said.

"I think what it is is that Perry just has to have the motivation to do it. Perry can play like that on a daily basis. It's just that Perry has to want to do that and play well all the time and sometimes he doesn't do that."


AllWildcats Top Stories