More on Gilchrist, Teague

"You get tired, but playing basketball is what I love to do," Teague said. "I have loved spending time with Mike. We were roommates like we usually are when we do stuff like this. We got to talk even more with this team and got to where we were really reading each other well on the court.

Statistics didn't really matter to Michael Gilchrist and Marquis Teague. All the two future University of Kentucky basketball players cared about was that they helped the United States win the gold medal Sunday at the FIBA Under 17 World Championship in Hamburg, Germany. Gilchrist had 16 points, four rebounds and one assist while Teague had four points and eight assists in a 111-80 win over Poland. "Oh my God. I have won a gold medal. There's not much more you can say than that," said Gilchrist. "I think everybody dreams of one day playing in the Olympics and hopefully this gives me a taste of what they could be like. We didn't really do anything we were not capable of doing to win. We just played the way we could." Teague felt going into the tournament that the U.S. had the best talent. "Every game our chemistry got better, too. We all just played to win," he said. "I know I came out and played as hard as I could every minute. That's the reason we played so well. Now we get to go home with the gold medal that we wanted. There's no better feeling than that." Teague, a point guard from Indianapolis, averaged 7.0 points, 8.0 assists and 1.9 rebounds per game while playing 19.5 minutes per contest. He shot 36 percent from the field (20-for-56) and 67 percent at the foul line (16-for-24). He had 48 assists compared to 19 turnovers. Gilchrist, a forward from Philadelphia, averaged 15.0 points per game despite playing only 19 minutes per game. He also added 7.3 rebounds and 1.8 assists per outing. He shot 65 percent from the field (42 for 64) and 80 percent at the foul line (36-for-45). He had 30 points and 15 rebounds in the semifinal win over Canada. "I like to fill a stat sheet. I try to do a lot for my teammates," Gilchrist said. "Whatever it takes to win, that's what I will do. I am on it when I see something needs to be done. I can do more than just score to help a team win." Both Teague and Gilchrist have been gone from home for several weeks training and playing with the USA team. However, there's no break this week for either player. Instead, both were headed to the NIKE Peach Jam in North Augusta, S.C., to participate in a 24-team tournament that showcases many of the nation's top prep players to a horde of college coaches." "You get tired, but playing basketball is what I love to do," Teague said. "I have loved spending time with Mike. We were roommates like we usually are when we do stuff like this. We got to talk even more with this team and got to where we were really reading each other well on the court. I got the same with (potential UK recruit) Tony Wroten, too. I knew what he would do and what to expect. That's why the more you play, the better you are." Gilchrist said he did not want a break from basketball. "I will go to Peach Jam, then home and then off to Indiana to play," Gilchrist, the nation's top-ranked senior-to-be, said. "I don't really get tired of playing basketball. I don't want time off." Gilchrist does have one dilemma — where to put his gold medal. "I am not sure what I will do with it or where I will put it, but I guarantee you it will be in a nice place," he said. "You don't get many chances to say you won a gold medal for your country."

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