Stubbs brings new offensive philosophy

With Bobby Petrino now in Atlanta, offensive coordinator Charlie Stubbs has taken the reigns of the Louisville offense. Stubbs, a coaching veteran, has both a different approach and offensive philosophy than the former mastermind of Louisville's explosive offense.

Bobby Petrino is no longer calling the plays for the Louisville offense. But even though the offensive-minded genius has taken his play-calling talents to the NFL, the Cardinals still expect to be explosive on offense this season.

With Petrino now in Atlanta, offensive coordinator Charlie Stubbs has taken the reigns of the U of L offense. Stubbs, a coaching veteran, has both a different approach and offensive philosophy than did Petrino.

One of the biggest differences might be this: Whereas Petrino constantly used offensive stats as a way of measuring offensive success, Stubbs doesn't seemed concerned with such things.

"We've got a different philosophy here a little bit," Stubbs said. "We have one goal – win football games. There's going to be games this year that we take what the defense gives us. We may rush for well over 300 yards one game and the next we might throw for 400 or 500 yards.

"We'll do whatever it takes and I want to do both aspects of the game well. But we don't worry about statistics. We really don't. We feel like if we play our style of ball there will be enough credit for everybody."

No one can deny the success Petrino had directing the Louisville offense. It's was an explosive offense capable of putting points on the scoreboard in bunches. It was fast, fun and entertaining, which made for lots of fun for Louisville fans the past few seasons.


Stubbs will look to get the ball
into the hands of playmakers
like Mario Urrutia.

While Stubbs' offense at Tulsa wasn't quiet as explosive as Petrino's, the Golden Hurricane still averaged 31 points per game the past four seasons. A veteran coordinator who directed the Alabama offense before joining Kragthorpe at Tulsa in 2003, Stubbs likes to create lots of movement and shifting on offense to create mismatches with the defense.

"The biggest thing that we're trying to do is be so multiple on offense that it makes the defensive coordinator in a given week of just so many practices have to minimize what he's doing," Stubbs said. "If he minimizes what he's doing coverage-wise, front-wise, then we know exactly what we're dealing with and can be able to attack it."

And Stubbs will find plenty of weapons in his arsenal to attack opposing defenses with this season, led by quarterback Brian Brohm, wide receivers Mario Urrutia, Harry Douglas and Scott Long, tight end Gary Barnidge and running back Anthony Allen and George Stripling.

"We want to be able to spray the ball around a lot and not just in the passing game," said Stubbs. "When we watched the (Louisville) film, we found out that we (Tulsa) were very similar."

Stubbs and Kragthorpe spent spring practice installing mostly the offense they brought with them from Tulsa. During the next few weeks of practice, Stubbs and Kragthorpe plan to implement most of their offensive package before the season-opener August 30 against Murray State.

"We got in about 60-65 percent during spring practice," Kragthorpe said. "In the next 29 practices we'll try to get as close to 90 (percent) going into the first game. Obviously each week you have wrinkles and you add and subtract a few things out of your game plan. Really when you go into a game about 70 percent of what you do in a game you do against anybody you play. Then the other 30 percent is customized to the opponent you're playing."


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