Coach Speak: Gary Marangi on Sean Christie

Maryland secured its 14th commitment Dec. 14 when offensive guard Sean Christie from Patchogue-Medford High in Medford, N.Y., pledged to the Terps. In order to give Terps fans a better idea of what kind of a player the program is getting, we spoke to Christie's (6-5, 280) head coach, Gary Marangi.

Maryland secured its 14th commitment Dec. 14 when offensive guard Sean Christie from Patchogue-Medford High in Medford, N.Y., pledged to the Terps. In order to give Terps fans a better idea of what kind of a player the program is getting, we spoke to Christie's (6-5, 280) head coach, Gary Marangi.

Terrapin Times: Coach, I know Sean didn't start coming onto the recruiting radar until just recently. When did Maryland start contacting you in earnest about him, and how did this deal come about?

Gary Marangi: I spoke to Coach [Keith] Dudzinksi in the spring about him, and then this fall I called him up to remind him. They were in the middle of the season but they started getting back to me. I kind of let it be known that if he had his pick where he'd like to go to school, it would be Maryland. Then a little later we started staying in touch more with [Maryland] in need of another lineman, and it went from there.

I knew he would start getting offers, it was just a matter of time. He's going to end up being a sleeping giant. There's very little known about him because he plays on Long Island, but he's a Division I player, no doubt. He's a no-brainer, and he'll do great at Maryland. I'm glad they showed the interest and didn't drop the ball after they looked at his film.

TT: So what makes him a special player Coach? What stands out about his game?

GM: First of all, he's only 17, and for a kid to be 6-5, 280, at that age … And you guys haven't gotten to see him yet, but when you do, you can see that he'll be 300, 310 pounds and you won't even see it on him. He's an athletic kid, he's got very good feet, long arms, and, like I said, you see a lot of 300 pounders who look sloppy, but he's a 300 pounder that looks the part.

TT: In terms of technique, what specifically does he do well?

GM: Well, we threw the ball 250 times this year, and he didn't allow one sack. He moves well, he gets to the next level, he can pull, and the way offenses are run now, he's done very well with traps, wraps and stuff. He's just excellent.

TT:: Every lineman needs work, especially coming from high school to college. What does Sean need to work on?

GM: Well he probably has to get a little stronger, no doubt, and I know he will. And then just getting adjusted to the speed of the game. I played Division I football, and the thing that hit me was how the speed of the game was different from high school to college and then college to the pros. And once he adjusts to that, he's going to be fine.

But I think he's pretty good with technique. I'm sure he'll have to learn how to pick up blitzes better, and just different ways colleges come after you as opposed to high school. But I have no doubt he'll pick it up quickly because he's very smart and intelligent on the field.

TT: Why do you think it took so long for a major program to come after him?

GM: Well, he did have three [I-AA] offers, so he did have offers. It was just a matter of timing and what people need. And, really, I don't believe the Long Island kids get the respect they deserve up here. A lot of them get overlooked because Long Island high school football can't compare to Florida, Georgia or Texas. I mean, people are running to Florida to get high school recruits, and a lot of time kids up here get overlooked. But I know every coach that has seen his film are very, very impressed, and some of them offered within days of seeing [the film].

TT: Can you compare Sean to another player on the college or NFL level just to give fans an idea of how he plays?

GM: Maybe a bit of D'Brickashaw [Ferguson]. That's a local tackle around here we see a lot. He's very athletic like D'Brickashaw, though I think Sean is going to be playing guard in college.

TT: What kid of a guy are the Terps getting? I've spoken to him and he seems very respectful

GM: I think he'll be respectful, and I think he understands the opportunity he has. And the greatest part is I think his family understands what an opportunity this is. He'll be great with the staff, he's a good listener, he's great with coaches. Maryland will be very, very happy with this kid.

TT: Coach, I asked Sean what he did off the field and if he had any hobbies and he basically said his life was football (laughs). Is that the case?

GM: Yeah, that's about it. I'm really not sure what else he does to be honest. He works out any chance he gets. I really don't know what else he does outside of football.

TT:What's he like in the locker room? Is he a vocal guy or a quieter guy?

GM: He'll give you a little of both. He's great with the guys, and he likes to joke with them. But on the practice field, he's very, very serious. He takes football very, very seriously, and that shows in the shape he's in -- it's amazing how he runs around -- and how hard he works on his craft.

And he's got that nasty streak you need. If you're playing football, unless you're a quarterback, if you don't have that streak you're in trouble out there (laughs).

TT:Anything else interesting about Sean? I know he was a three-year starter… Anything else?

GM: Well, he has one sibling, an older sister. And his father, he's pretty tall. But the thing about Sean, like I said earlier, is that he just turned 17 in August. He's young, and he's kind of like a baby football wise. His good years are way ahead of him, I really believe that. Maryland is getting a good one.

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