Moore Gives the Scoop on DeGuglielmo

Brendan Moore hadn't met his new college position coach in person as of Jan. 20, but the Westwood (Austin, Texas) offensive tackle did have quite an extensive conversation with new Maryland offensive line coach Dave DeGuglielmo. The 6-foot-4, 270-pound Moore, who committed to the Terps last June, said he spoke to DeGuglielmo soon after he was hired and the two hit on a variety of topics.

Brendan Moore hadn't met his new college position coach in person as of Jan. 20, but the Westwood (Austin, Texas) offensive tackle did have quite an extensive conversation with new Maryland offensive line coach Dave DeGuglielmo. The 6-foot-4, 270-pound Moore, who committed to the Terps last June, said he spoke to DeGuglielmo soon after he was hired and the two hit on a variety of topics.

"I know it sounds kind of strange, but I love the guy already. He's my kind of coach," Moore said. "I talked to him at length, and you could just tell he's very, very straightforward, very focused and you can just tell he knows his craft well and is going to be a great teacher."

Moore expects to meet DeGuglielmo in person shortly, after which he'll know even more about his future coach. In the meantime, though, he's excited about the prospects of playing for him.

"He was explaining at length what he expects, the coaching methods he has and how hard he coaches to get the best out of every single one of his players," Moore said. "I get the feeling every one of his players would go to bat for him, and he would do the same for them. I had a great feeling about [former Terps offensive line coach Tom] Brattan, but I really like what I heard from Coach Gug."

DeGuglielmo, 45, brings 22 years of coaching experience to the table. A Massachusetts native and Boston University graduate, he spent time as an assistant at BU, Connecticut, South Carolina, the New York Giants, Miami Dolphins and most recently the New York Jets.

"He has a lot of NFL experience, and that speaks to how good of a coach he is," Moore said. "Coaching in the League is not a small feat by any means. For me, the NFL is not the end-all, be-all; I'm not putting my eggs in that basket. But the fact that he has coached at that level for so long is very encouraging, and he's obviously someone who knows what he's doing. He's helped a lot of players over the years and really stood up for them."

Moore said DeGuglielmo didn't get into specific coaching techniques, but the Westwood lineman could tell the line coach knew what he was talking about.

"I just know he expects a lot out of his players and he's going to push them," Moore said. "Obviously I haven't worked with him yet, but he seems like a straightforward, hands-on coach who is going to tell it like it is."

In other words, don't expect any warm and fuzzies out of the new Terps' O-line coach. He developed a reputation in New York as a grizzled, no-nonsense type, but also someone who'd have his linemen's backs. Several articles detailed how he fought for the Jets to keep inconsistent right tackle Wayne Hunter, and the team apparently heeded his advice.

"I think it's pretty hard to get into that circle of people he'll put his arm around, but I can tell that he's going to be there for his players," Moore said. "And like I said, he's going to go to bat for any of them. I can tell he cares about his players."

Before taking the Maryland job, DeGuglielmo, who the Jets fired last year, had been in the NFL since 2004, so some are questioning his recruiting prowess. But to a player like Moore, who wants to be pushed, he said any lineman with aspirations of improving or reaching their potential should want to play for the veteran line coach.

"I don't really have any information to back this up, but I think he'll be an amazing recruiter," Moore said. "If you want to learn, if you want to get better, [DeGuglielmo] seems like the guy you'd want to coach you."

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