Maryland-Duke in the Rearview Mirror

DURHAM, N.C. -- The "not our rivals!" chant started early — less than five minutes into what might be the final Maryland-Duke game Feb. 15 during the under-16 media timeout. They grew even louder as the Blue Devils clinched a 69-67 victory, when Terps power forward Charles Mitchell's 5-footer came tantalizingly close to going through the hoop before falling off the right side of the rim.

DURHAM, N.C. -- The "not our rivals!" chant started early — less than five minutes into what might be the final Maryland-Duke game Feb. 15 during the under-16 media timeout. They grew even louder as the Blue Devils clinched a 69-67 victory, when Terps power forward Charles Mitchell's 5-footer came tantalizingly close to going through the hoop before falling off the right side of the rim.

And as proudly as the Cameron Crazies chanted, they seemed to be alone in that school of thought, as a historic 61-year rivalry came to an end.

"It all started with Lefty," Duke head coach Mike Krzyzewski said, referring to the heated matchups throughout the 1970s and 1980s between the two teams while Lefty Driesell was at the helm in College Park.

Krzyzewski came into the picture in the 1980-81 season as an unproven commodity hired by Duke after five seasons at Army. Since then, the two teams have developed one of the nation's most heated rivalries, with ACC fans considering the matchup a must-watch on a yearly basis.

As Maryland moves into the Big Ten next season — a move that was mainly financially motivated — however, the two teams will no longer meet on a yearly basis with the only future opportunities being during the ACC/Big Ten Challenge or postseason play.

"Over the years, those players, coaches, and teams who have shared these unforgettable moments…I don't know what price it's worth, because it won't be replicated," Krzyzewski said.

There was the 1984 ACC Championship, where Len Bias scored 26 points to help deliver Maryland their first conference tournament title since 1958 with a 74-62 win over Duke. There was the 1995 epic when both teams' head coaches were absent due to medical troubles and Joe Smith scored a career-high 41 points, including a buzzer-beating tip-in to give the Terps a 94-92 win.

There was the 2001 season, where the teams met four times between January and March, climaxing with a Final Four matchup that the Blue Devils took in overtime en route to a national title.

A year later, the Terps captured the national championship and finished 15-1 in the ACC. The only loss that year? Duke, naturally.

"Intense basketball games, two great coaches preparing their teams extremely well, two great teams going at it for 40 minutes," said Terps great Juan Dixon, who was front and center for those epic meetings in 2001 and 2002. "I have a lot of memories and am very fortunate to be part of those classic games in the past."

"It's two great programs. Gary [Williams] had it rolling, Coach K [Mike Krzyzewski] had it rolling, teams were wining national championships and getting to Final Fours," Maryland head coach Mark Turgoen said. "There were some monster games during that stretch."

There have been the superstars on both sides: Bias, Joe Smith, Dixon, and Greivis Vazquez for Maryland. Jason Williams, Shane Battier, J.J. Redick and Carlos Boozer for Duke. But there have also been the "unforgettable moments" that Krzyzewski referenced — the Terps' 1988 upset under Bob Wade; Steve Blake's steal from Jason Williams right before halftime in 2002; Dixon leading the Terps to a blowout win at the final Duke game in Cole Field House; John Gilchrist's heroics in the 2004 ACC Tournament; Dave Neal's screen that left Nolan Smith concussed in 2009; Seth Allen's free throws in 2013; Dez Wells' 17 second-half points in 2014. All of those and more will stick in Terps fans' memories as benchmarks of the program's legacy in the ACC and the Duke rivalry.

""From the day I set food on the campus, it was Duke – you see the ["I hate"] Duke shirts all around … This game means a lot to a lot of people," Turgeon said. "It's Duke. We know what it represents to Maryland [and] our fan base. …

"I'm gonna miss it like crazy."

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