TT Evaluation Of Baseball Commit Tyler Blohm

Let's take a look at the many Terps baseball verbal commitments of the future, beginning with 2016 Archbishop Spalding LHP Tyler Blohm. The Maryland staff has appeared to let its zeal for this young star pitcher known from the beginning stages of his recruitment, and it appears well justified.

Let's take a look at the many Terps baseball verbal commitments of the future, beginning with 2016 Archbishop Spalding (Severn, Md.) left-hander Tyler Blohm. The Maryland staff has appeared to let zeal for this young, star pitcher known from the beginning stages of his recruitment. And today was no different as the staff was present on this cold, blustry April afternoon to show its support for the junior.

When Blohm stands on the mound, you first notice his size. He stands 6-3 and weighs 180 pounds, and he has plenty of time to fill out his frame. His father was in the crowd, and he is a very large man. So it's always good to have genes on your side.

Blohm carries himself well both on and off the field. He is a mature young man who is completely focused with the ball in his hand. There is a reason Blohm is ranked as the 25th-best junior left handed prospect in the country, and the 163rd-best prospect in his class. Not to mention he is the fourth-rated junior in Maryland.

To truly appreciate Blohm's performance, one needs to study him as he pitches. He has a classic, compact delivery, which reminds some of a young Cliff Lee. Remember his body is still growing, so his maximum velocity is probably two years away, maybe three. Today the gun had his fastball between 84-87 mph and his curve was registering in the 70-72 range. Tyler was mixing in a changeup at a speed somewhere between his fastball and slow curve. He is continuing to gain better command of the change and following the summer circuit, it should be more of a consistent part of his arsenal during his senior campaign.

Blohm did not allow a hit until the fourth inning. There were some fielding blemishes behind him, but he shrugged them off without allowing a run until the sixth. After allowing a double in the sixth, a wild throw by the first baseman on a pickoff attempt allowed the first run to score and set up a second run following a single.

After six innings, Blohm had not given up an earned run to a very good Mt. St. Joseph (Baltimore, Md.) ballclub, but trailed by two. Just as Blohm had his teammates' backs early in the contest, his squad redeemed themselves of their poor defense by scoring three runs in the sixth to take the lead for good.

And just as Blohm led off the game by striking out the side, he finished by striking out the side in the seventh. He finished the contest with seven strikeouts with just two walks. The home umpire's strike zone was very tight and he heard the hecklers all evening. Blohm's numbers could have been more one-sided as fas as his strikeout to walk ratio.

The best trait to take away from watching Blohm pitch is his accuracy. He is not the hardest thrower in high school. But his mechanics are spot-on for every pitch. This allows Blohm to locate the ball exactly where he needs to get ahead in the counts. He moves the ball around very well from one side of the plate to the other on a downward trajectory. He makes it very difficult to make good, solid contact. Also, when a speedster singled late in the game, Blohm displayed a variety of deft pickoff moves, which had the runner diving back before Blohm released the ball. And just when it looked as if he was tiring in the 5th and 6th innings, by hanging a few breaking balls, he came out and mowed them down to finish the game.

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