Live Scouting Report: Chase Young

HYATTSVILLE, Md. – Class of 2017 defensive end Chase Young just transferred into DeMatha (Hyattsville, Md.) several months ago, and his first opportunity to show out with the Stags came Aug. 29 against powerhouse Miami Central (Miami, Fla.). The multi-offer junior ended up recording seven tackles, three sacks, a batted ball and four tackles for loss in the 38-14 DeMatha victory.

HYATTSVILLE, Md. – Class of 2017 defensive end Chase Young just transferred into DeMatha (Hyattsville, Md.) several months ago, and his first opportunity to show out with the Stags came Aug. 29 against powerhouse Miami Central (Miami, Fla.). The multi-offer junior ended up recording seven tackles, three sacks, a batted ball and four tackles for loss in the 38-14 DeMatha victory.

The Terps are a prime contender for Young’s services, and Terrapin Times was on-hand to scout the emerging edge rusher. Our take on his game is below and our interview in the video above:

The 6-foot-5, 220-pound Young has hose-length arms and a long frame that, once he bulks up, could make him an ideal defensive end at the FBS level.

A violent, aggressive edge rusher, Young has terrific initial giddy-up and possesses solid point-of-attack power. In fact, he’s so explosive off the ball he sometimes beats blockers before they set up. Young’s acceleration and suddenness allow him to cut around a tackle’s backside, or slice inside with a direct line to the quarterback.

Young’s raw athleticism, though, is his major selling point. Not only can he run circles around blindside blockers, but he’s fast enough to be a special teams gunner, making a tackle on the return man. It follows that he can catch backs who hit the edge, or run down skill players from behind.

The DeMatha end hits hard too, his tackles often stalemating backs in their tracks. He displays sound form and doesn’t surrender leaky yardage after wrapping up. 

To improve, Young needs to diversify his game. Right now, he’s a pure pass rusher, relying on his talent and power to knife into backfields. He plays some stand-up end, but doesn’t show much in the way of pass-coverage or edge-setting responsibilities. And, when blitzing, Young has to vary his rush moves, learning how to rip and go; deke outside before cutting inside; and the like. Moreover, while Young’s punch is potent, his hand placement isn’t always on point. Sometimes he strikes too high, limiting his effectiveness and ability to disengage.

Young also tends to play high, compromising his leverage and allowing offensive linemen to get under his pads. Every once in awhile you’ll see Young get driven off the line because he doesn’t gain extension, get his hands up fast enough, or play low enough.

Furthermore, Young has to improve his lateral agility, making more plays up and down the line. He’s certainly athletic and tough enough to tackle in traffic, but he’ll need more power and stronger hands to pick through the trash and locate backs in the gaps.

Also, when he’s on the edge, in space, Young can be a bit flatfooted. He tends to get caught on his heels when attempting to pursue or funnel runners inside.

Mostly, though, Young needs to bulk up. Right now, he can be neutralized by top-level tackles, who, after dealing with the initial rapidity, can stalemate him. If Young can hone his form, add strength and diversify his arsenal, he could very well be one the DMV’s foremost recruits by this time next year.


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