Live Evaluation & Interview: Austin Fontaine

OWINGS MILLS, Md. -- McDonogh (Owings Mills, Md.) hosted DeMatha (Hyattsville, Md.) Sept. 16 in a WCAC-MIAA matchup. Terrapin Times was on hand to scout four-star defensive tackle Austin Fontaine, a 6-foot-3, 318-pounder with offers from the likes of Penn State, Ohio State, Michigan, Clemson, Maryland, Tennessee, Georgia and others.

OWINGS MILLS, Md. -- McDonogh (Owings Mills, Md.) hosted DeMatha (Hyattsville, Md.) Sept. 16 in a WCAC-MIAA matchup. Terrapin Times was on hand to scout four-star defensive tackle Austin Fontaine, a 6-foot-3, 318-pounder with offers from the likes of Penn State, Ohio State, Michigan, Clemson, Maryland, Tennessee, Georgia and others.

Our analysis on Fontaine’s game is below, while an interview can be seen above:

Fontaine is a powerful specimen and projects as an immediate-impact 3-technique at the next level. He could be a starter early during his career provided he continues to work.

Physically, Fontaine has a big, thick frame with a sturdy base and broad shoulders. He has long arms and two powerful, strong mitts.

At the snap, Fontaine possesses a decent get-off and typically comes off the ball low. He keeps his pads down, plays with balance, has terrific leg drive and a potent initial strike. His hand placement is on point too, Fontaine hitting underneath the pads.

Fontaine is a load inside with superior strength and power, and if he’s facing a single blocker, more often than not Fontaine’s going to win that battle. He can easily toss his man or shed blocks.

Moreover, Fontaine excels at running down the line and making plays outside the A- and B-gaps. He’s fairly nimble and moves well for a big man. Speaking of which, Fontaine has enough speed and mobility to chase runners down from behind. He’s very good at catching runners on the edge and even in backside pursuit.

Also, Fontaine’s a potent tackler who knows how to finish. He wraps well, allows little leaky yardage and has the ability to drive his man backwards.

When rushing the passer, Fontaine’s adept at busting into the backfield and flushing the quarterback from the pocket. He’s a fast closer and seems to gain a step or two when chasing the signal caller.

To get even better, Fontaine must quicken up his feet. His initial get-off can be a hair slow, and sometimes he’ll get caught flatfooted on misdirection plays. Fontaine also has a bit of trouble when shifting his weight and changing direction in the open field.

Furthermore, Fontaine relies on his athleticism and strength when rushing the passer, so he needs to develop his rush moves. It would behoove him to expand his arsenal and improve his technique.

 


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