Live Evaluation & Interview: Tayon Fleet-Davis

CAPITOL HEIGHTS, Md. -- Potomac (Oxon Hill, Md.) traveled to Fairmont Heights (Capitol Heights, Md.) Sept. 24 for a Prince George’s County matchup. Terrapin Times was on hand to scout Potomac running back and Maryland commit Tayon Fleet-Davis, a 6-foot, 211-pound three-star. An evaluation of Fleet-Davis is below, while an interview can be seen above:

CAPITOL HEIGHTS, Md. -- Potomac (Oxon Hill, Md.) traveled to Fairmont Heights (Capitol Heights, Md.) Sept. 24 for a Prince George’s County matchup. Terrapin Times was on hand to scout Potomac running back and Maryland commit Tayon Fleet-Davis, a 6-foot, 211-pound three-star.

An evaluation of Fleet-Davis is below, while an interview can be seen above:

Fleet-Davis is an old-school runner, a big, powerful north-south back who can push the pile and methodically move the chains. The 6-foot, 211 pounder has a chance to be a feature back if his speed and quickness improve, but at the very least he'll be a solid short-yardage runner.

Physically, Fleet-Davis has a linebacker-esque frame, complete with a developed upper body and a stout base. In fact, most of his muscle is in his lower body, which is how he generates such tremendous leg drive. Fleet-Davis also possesses fairly long fingers and strong hands, aiding him in the passing game and holding onto the football in traffic.

As aforementioned, the Potomac back is a one-cut-and-go type who gets up the field in a hurry. There is little wasted movement or dancing in the backfield. Rather, Fleet-Davis anticipates the hole, reads his keys and then bursts through.

Sometimes one-cut runners tend to run up their linemen's backs, but Fleet-Davis remains patient. He allows the block to develop and knows how to use his teammates to find a seam. 

It follows that the three-star has above-average vision and field awareness. He has that knack for anticipating when and where the openings will be, while he's able to identify and adjust to defensive schemes. Fleet-Davis knows how to set a linebacker up, for example, by flowing off tackle before planting his foot and cutting inside behind his guard. 

Moreover, Fleet-Davis runs with terrific balance thanks to his stout base. He also chops his steps, keeps his pads low and gets "skinny" in the holes, making him even more difficult to wrap up. 

Fleet-Davis typically busts through arm tackles and rarely goes down after first contact. He's a true grinder and will fight for every last inch, usually falling forward after defenders stop his progress.

Furthermore, Fleet-Davis has enough lateral agility and quickness to make plays on the edge. He won’t routinely turn the corner, but he can beat a backer to a spot and has enough shake to throw a move; make a man miss; and pick up an extra yard or two. 

And Fleet-Davis is a threat in the passing game too. He has soft, natural hands and can create yards in space. Once Fleet-Davis gets moving downhill, he's able to gain momentum and shoot by defenders.

The main concern with Fleet-Davis is obviously his speed. This is not a runner who's going to hit the home run or pull away from safeties. He also doesn't have the deftness needed to be a cutback type or someone who can consistently break linebackers' ankles in space.

Fleet-Davis could stand to improve his acceleration too, as he doesn’t routinely reach the second level. He is quick to attack the gaps, but we'd like to see a bit more burst so he can pop through before defenders plug the hole. 

Finally, Fleet-Davis must continue honing his blocking technique. He's a willing pass blocker, but his hand placement and form need work. 


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