Live Evaluation & Interview: Lawtez Rogers

GREENBELT, Md. -- In a Prince George’s County class 4A battle, Roosevelt (Greenbelt, Md.) hosted Bowie (Md.) Oct. 8. Terrapin Times was on hand to scout and interview Roosevelt three-star defensive end Lawtez Rogers, a 6-foot-5, 253-pounder with a Maryland offer.

GREENBELT, Md. -- In a Prince George’s County class 4A battle, Roosevelt (Greenbelt, Md.) hosted Bowie (Md.) Oct. 8. Terrapin Times was on hand to scout and interview Roosevelt three-star defensive end Lawtez Rogers, a 6-foot-5, 253-pounder with a Maryland offer.

Our take on his game is below, while an interview can be viewed above:

Rogers has to continue developing his fundamentals, but he has upside given his size, speed and athleticism. He projects as a solid rotational piece after a couple years in college, with the potential to rise up the depth chart during the latter stages of his career. Rogers currently lines up as a 5-technique, but he could be moved to 3-technique at the next level.

From a physical standpoint, Rogers has ideal size and length for a defensive lineman. He has a strong lower body, good arm length and big, violent hands. Rogers, though already muscle strewn, also has the frame to take on weight if need be.

At the snap, Rogers has an above-average first step and plus burst. He has the ability to beat offensive linemen off the ball and explode into the backfield.

Indeed, Rogers closes in quickly, seemingly gaining momentum as he shoots downhill. Rogers also knows how to feint outside before shooting inside, while he has enough quickness to rush around the edge.

The Roosevelt end is powerful too, particularly when defending the run. He packs a punch at the point of attack, and fights and scraps in the gaps, using his long arms to corral backs inside. He shows the ability to finish off runners as well, sometimes providing a thump.

Rogers also has decent athleticism, proving he can make plays down the line and on the edge. He has enough quickness to catch backs before they turn the corner and enough speed to track down runners from behind.

To get even better, Rogers has to work on several technical areas. First and foremost, he has to play with better leverage as he tends to come off the ball high. He doesn’t always drive from his base or keep his feet moving after contact, either.

Moreover, Rogers has to consistently get his arms extended and quicken up his initial thrust since offensive linemen sometimes get into his body. As a result, Rogers can be stood up at the point of attack and pushed off the ball. He also has some issues disengaging, Rogers tending to get caught in the trash from time to time.

Furthermore, he needs to hone his hand placement, making sure he hits inside the pads. Right now, his point-of-attack power isn’t as potent as it could be because he doesn’t always strike in an ideal spot.

Rogers must vary his rush moves too, since he still relies on his raw skills to beat his man. He could stand to develop a rip and swim or a spin move instead of just a bull-rush.

It would behoove Rogers to hone his feet as well. He tends to get crossed up when moving laterally, while he has a bit of trouble maneuvering inside and attempting to slice through the gaps.

And when defending in space, Rogers has to do a better job angling up runners. Basically, his change-of-direction speed, agility and footwork need improving to deal with quick-twitch backs.

Next, Rogers must make sure he consistently finishes his tackles. He doesn’t always pack a punch, a result of faulty technique and not consistently driving from his base.

Lastly, the Greenbelt native has to continue building his body and working on his conditioning. He’s in good shape now, but could stand another year in a strength program to ready himself for power-five football.


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