Dave Lomonico/Terrapin Times

Live Evaluation: Tyree Henry

BALTIMORE, Md. -- In an MIAA A-Conference matchup, Gilman (Baltimore, Md.) hosted St. Frances (Baltimore, Md.) Oct. 7. Terrapin Times was on hand to scout St. Frances 2018 receiver Tyree Henry, a 6-foot-4, 205-pounder with early offers from Maryland, Syracuse, WVU and Va Tech.

BALTIMORE, Md. -- In an MIAA A-Conference matchup, Gilman (Baltimore, Md.) hosted St. Frances (Baltimore, Md.) Oct. 7. Terrapin Times was on hand to scout St. Frances 2018 receiver Tyree Henry, a 6-foot-4, 233-pounder with early offers from Maryland, Syracuse, WVU and Va Tech.

Our take on his game is below (Henry was injured during the second half of the game, so an interview could not be conducted):

Henry is an imposing, physical receiver with a high ceiling given his size and athleticism. He’s still rather raw, however, and he’s not the fastest receiver around, so he might project as a tight end or defensive end in college. Even so, he should be a contributor at an FBS program, perhaps very early during his career. 

Physically, Henry possesses ideal height for a receiver, to go along with a sinewy frame; pole-length arms and mitt-sized hands. His body looks almost college ready right now, although he’d have to pack on more muscle if he’s to be a tight end.

In-between the lines, Henry does the majority of his damage in the intermediate range. He’s a mismatch against most defenders with his size, athleticism and catch radius, particularly in the red zone.

Indeed, Henry flashes soft hands and snags the ball away from his body. Even when he’s hit immediately after a reception, he tends to hang on. Moreover, Henry high points the ball, doesn’t shy away from contact and uses his frame to shield off defenders. Henry also possesses above-average body control, showing the ability to readjust to poorly thrown passes.

After the catch, Henry can plow defenders over, especially after he gains momentum. He’ll run straight through arm tackles and has enough power to drag safeties and corners for extra yards.

Speaking of power, Henry's strong enough to fight through initial jams and toss cornerbacks. He has a potent punch and usually is able to stay on his route. He's also a willing blocker and can drive corners downfield on run plays.

To improve, Henry needs to tighten up his fundamentals. Namely, his route running must be sharper and his footwork more precise. At the moment, his patterns are rather slow developing, almost as if he’s thinking about each step rather than running naturally. His breaks, change of direction and overall quickness all need honing.

Furthermore, Henry must become more sudden in his movements, starting with his get off. His initial step has to be quicker, and his burst and acceleration- – during the route and after the catch -- need to be taken up a notch too. Currently, Henry doesn’t have that second gear to pull away from defenders in the open field. He’s not the type who’s going to take the top off the secondary or split the seam.

Next, Henry has to improve his blocking out on the edge. He will give up his body, but his hand placement and form need honing.

Finally, Henry has to keep improving his field awareness. He has to learn how to identify defensive tendencies, disguise his routes, readjust his patterns when the play breaks down and the like.


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