Maryland/Virginia Tech- High Five, Low Five

TSR breaks down the high and low five points of this past weekend's game against Virginia Tech.

High Five

Jamarr Robinson

Sophomore quarterback Jamarr Robinson could be thanked for the majority of the offense for the Terps on Saturday in the loss to Virginia Tech. Robinson completed 12 of 32 passes for 104 yards in the air but with no touchdowns or interceptions. In addition, Robinson also put up some pretty impressive numbers on the ground. On 24 rushing attempts, Jamarr Robinson ran for 124 yards. You would like to see more yards in the air and a better completion percentage, but in his first start, Maryland fans have to be happy with what they saw.

Torrey Smith

Wide receiver and kick returner Torrey Smtih had 55 yards on four receptions and 60 yards on special teams for the Terps. In doing so, Smith set a single-season Maryland record for all-purpose yards. The record was previously held by LaMont Jordan with 1,840 yards. Smith has continuously been the go to receiver for both Turner and, now, Robinson.

Keeping the Ball

Maryland has been known this season as the team who likes to turn the ball over. With a first-time starting quarterback under center and with an injury-plagued team, one would think that Saturday's game would be no different. Surprisingly enough, the Terps didn't turn the ball over at all against the No. 21 ranked Virginia Tech Hokies.

Spreading the Ball Around

Quarterback Jamarr Robinson got the ball to eight different receivers in the loss to Virginia Tech on Saturday. This is definitely a change of pace from the days of Chris Turner, where the ball would get to just two or three receivers.

Jared Harrell

The senior defensive linemen picked up a fumble which resulted in the only touchdown Maryland scored. There isn't really much to speak on when it comes to this. The only touchdown of the game was important, but the Terps missed the two-point conversion. It seems that even this high five isn't very high.

Low five

Defense

The Terps allowed 484 total yards against Virginia Tech in Saturday's loss. The Terps gave up 36 points and, in general, never looked like they were capable of stopping the Hokies prominent offense. The first drive especially looked as though it would embody the theme of the entire game. A ten play, 71 yard drive to open the game.

Injuries Again

In addition to all the injuries sustained by the Terps, a few more key players will find themselves sidelined heading into next week's game. Defensive back and punt returner Kenny Tate is out with an ankle injury and punter Travis Baltz will be out with a broken finger. Sadly enough, the season only gets bleaker for the struggling Terps. Injuries have hit this team hard this season; so much in fact, that the Terps now have lost five straight games.

Running backs

When your quarterback has more yards on the ground than the rest of the team combined, something's up. Granted, Jamarr Robinson has the footwork of a track star and the Terps didn't run the ball all that much with any specified running backs; it still doesn't speak very highly of the Terp's running game. Davin Meggett only rushed for four yards on as many carries and didn't have an impact on the game whatsoever.

The First Quarter

Virginia Tech scored twice in the first quarter, making it a seemingly impossible hole to climb out from. The Terps didn't have anything left in them after the first quarter it seemed. They had been dominated on a few drives and 2 scores that left them with a bitter taste in their mouths. Even though the average fan would say, “There's too much game left,” this would not be the case for Maryland.

The Crowd

Byrd Stadium felt like Blacksburg on Saturday afternoon. If it wasn't the vast amount of Tech fans in the general admission seats, it was the lack of effort on the student's behalf with the blackout. Maybe it was the fact that blackouts are generally night games, or maybe it was that the Terp's season has been disappointing to say the least. Regardless, the crowd's presence wasn't really felt and could have been reason why the Terps seemed flat.


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