Is Cory White big enough?

After the news broke of Cory White's commitment to the University of Miami, his size was the topic of discussion surrounding his commitment. Is his size worthy of an offer this early? Lets take a closer look.

I remember getting a call from Fleming Island recruiting coordinator Joel Brighton about a month before our Scout.com Combine in Jacksonville. He was on the other end of the phone telling me about an offensive lineman he had who he thought people were sleeping on. Brighton told me the kid has all the skills to be a quality Division 1 linemen but lacked size.

After he told me the kid he was referring to was only about 215 pounds, I was thinking to myself that's way too small! However, when watching White's film after Brighton sent it to me, I saw a very athletic and aggressive left tackle.

If you watch his highlight clips posted here on Scout, you'll see what I mean. He shows a number of good qualities for an offensive tackle prospect: a good punch on the first play (he's also a boxer in his spare time so you can see where that will come in handy for him), the quickness to get out in front on the third play, which ends in an explosive block. A lot of big guys will get to that point but the explosive pop is missing. White is capable and shows how to explosively finish a block. On the eighth play, he shows tremendous quickness in getting into his stance. On the ninth play, his pad level is where you want it.

I could continue breaking it down but the bottom line is that he has good film. The only problem with that is that he's only about 6-4 and around 200 pounds on that film. Or is that a good thing?

I remember seeing White at our combine and thinking to myself that he definitely has a nice frame. I immediately thought back to when Brighton told me they believe he'll grow into a good-sized offensive tackle at the college level. I began thinking back to when I saw Matt Patchan at a combine before his junior year. Although he was 6-6 at the time, he was in the high 220's. It didn't matter. He had a frame that would enable him to add a lot of weight and he had a lot of good qualities you look for in a tackle. A year later, he was the most heavily recruited lineman in the state of Florida.

I'm not suggesting White is another Patchan but what I am saying is that White is not too small. According to his coach, he's already gained almost 20 pounds since our combine a little over two months ago and there's no reason to believe he won't put on another 15-20 before the start of his senior season. If he gets to the 6-5/250 range, no one will be talking about his size anymore since he could easily be 260+ by the time he starts his college career.

When Tony Boselli, the former NFL All Pro tackle for the Jags, signed a contract to become the highest paid offensive tackle in pro football he mentioned how he was close to 230 pounds coming out of high school. Bryant McKinnie wasn't much bigger than that. I remember meeting Joaquin Gonzalez at Miami's spring game in 1996 and him telling me that he will be walking on at UM that fall. I asked him his size and he told me he was in the 230 range.

Sure, for every Gonzalez or Boselli there's a Jim Sikora or Jim Wilson, who have trouble putting on weight in college. However, it works both ways. The original question, which has been discussed at length on the boards, was whether or not White's big enough. The answer is yes. He might not be ready to play Division 1 football as a left tackle right now but neither was Bryant McKinnie at that age.

Cory White was offered by the University of Miami. That means the coaches feel he's capable of competing with anybody in this year's class, based on the timing of the offer. They could have waited until later in the year to see how much weight he does put on. Instead, they jumped on him now and that might be a very smart move, considering his coach believes several other major college programs were on the verge of offering him.

Don't sleep on White because of his size because before long, he won't look that much different, physically, than a lot of the quality offensive tackles this school has produced over the years.


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