Michigan offensive tackle Erik Magnuson has been with the Wolverines through tough times. Sitting at 9-3, Magnuson eyes elusive 10th win.

Michigan offensive tackle Erik Magnuson has been with the Wolverines through tough times. Sitting at 9-3, Magnuson eyes elusive 10th win.

Making the transition from California to Ann Arbor four years ago, this career wasn't exactly what Erik Magnuson envisioned.

A career in which Magnuson, a native of Carlsbad, saw the Wolverines reach depths he never thought possible again, ultimately resulting in a coaching transition prior to his senior season.

Coming off a 5-7 finish in 2014, the final season for former head coach Brady Hoke, the 9-3 mark now in 2015 under first year coach Jim Harbaugh is special to the 6-foot-6, 296-pounder.

Still, despite the accomplishments to date leading up to Friday's Citrus Bowl match-up with Florida, Magnuson and Michigan have their eyes set on something more.

A 10 win season.

"For us who were on the team last year I think it would mean a lot because it would mean doubling our wins from last year," Magnuson said. "Going through a coaching change is hard and it takes a lot on the players and learning everything new and getting used to the new coaching staff is difficult.

"To come back and get 10 wins would be huge for our team, especially for the guys who experienced the last few years, especially last year. 10 wins is kind of like the benchmark in college football to say whether or not you had a successful year or not."

According to the goals of the program, winning the Big Ten Championship and potentially challenging for more marks the success or failure of the Wolverines year in and year out.

Although Michigan fell short of those goals, to get to double digit victories in Harbaugh's first season would be a significant accomplishment, given where this program appeared headed.

While the coaching staff has certainly implemented their personalities and schemes, the players, particularly the players that have been through the good and bad in Ann Arbor, are the ones making this season a reality.

"I think the group of guys are just hungry," he said. "Experiencing a year at Michigan where you don't make it to a bowl game is difficult because there's such high expectations.

"When we got new coaching and had to learn a whole new system, it came down to guys wanting it more and we were hungry to get some success and we're still hungry, hasn't stopped."

Michigan takes on Florida Friday at 1 p.m. in the Citrus Bowl.


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