Michigan quarterback Wilton Speight proved capable of competing for the starting job in a 14-13 win at Friday's spring game.

Michigan quarterback Wilton Speight proved capable of competing for the starting job in a 14-13 win at Friday's spring game.

A year ago at this time, Shane Morris and Alex Malzone were quarterbacking Michigan in Jim Harbaugh's first spring game as head coach.

Battling a groin injury, Wilton Speight was only able to participate in some drill work, left on the sideline at the big house.

After serving as the back-up to Jake Rudock throughout the 2015 season, Speight is healthy and eager to prove his late game heroics in a comeback win at Minnesota are just a sign of things to come.

In Friday night's spring game, Speight out performed perceived favorite to be the starter at quarterback in John O'Korn, helping lead the maize team to a 14-13 win.

"I think going into the spring game you obviously don't want to be showing all of your cards so we had a restricted game plan," Speight said. "There was a lot of dink and dunking, that first ball I threw was just a launch ball out of bounds. 

"That was the game plan going in, get completions, move the ball down the field and don't really show everything we've got."

Friday, Speight showed enough to cement himself as a serious candidate in the quarterback competition. 

Appearing in complete control of the offense, Speight executed a multitude of plays to perfection. 

Good enough to win the starting job?

"Obviously any position, when you're in a position battle and you're doing well you want to think that about yourself," Speight said. "If you don't then there's probably a problem with you. But when it comes down to it that's up to the coaches to decide."

"Good spring ball, really across the board from all positions," he added. "The coaches were happy and I think we made a lot of progress over 15 practices."

Speight even showcased some mobility, scampering for a six yard touchdown run and scrambling out of the pocket for positive yardage with ease.

"I guess since I'm 6-6, 6-7, 240-pounds people don't really think of me as an athlete or be able to run but I've always kind of been like that going back to my high school lacrosse days," Speight said. "I guess I was able to show everybody that today."


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