Michigan athletic director Warde Manuel backed his football coach Jim Harbaugh in his quest for more satellite camps this off-season.

Michigan athletic director Warde Manuel backed his football coach Jim Harbaugh in his quest for more satellite camps this off-season.

Before Jim Harbaugh coached one game as Michigan's head coach, the college football world was on notice that things would be different.

No, it didn't come with any guarantees or midfield spats with a rival coach, it came in the form of satellite camps across the United States. 

More specifically, football camps in recruiting hot beds held by Harbaugh and the Wolverines' coaching staff. Florida, Texas and California most notably, with several top prospects showing up to compete.

Now in his second off-season in Ann Arbor, Harbaugh is gung-ho about the satellite camps once again, only this time it's unclear whether or not Michigan will be able to hold them.

The SEC led the charge in the fight against satellite camps, with several coaches unhappy with the recruiting advantage Michigan would receive holding camps in their backyard.

Now the NCAA is in the process of potentially shutting satellite camps down for good, offering rules to prevent it from happening in the future.

For now though, Harbaugh and Michigan athletic director Warde Manuel await word.

"I don't remember the legislation," Manuel told media recently. "I'm not sure if it's effective immediately, that would be hard to do based on plans and expenditures that have been made or are out. More than likely, when it's not an emergency type of situation or a rule, and there's time, they normally would say effective August of 2016. 

"They could come out and pass it as an immediate rule but I'm not sure where it's trending now."

With tons of blow back and criticism of the satellite camps themselves, Manuel backs his head coach and believes overall, there's more good in them than bad.

"I'm supportive of it," Manuel said. "I'm supportive of satellite camps and the opportunity for coaches to go around the country and try to get a chance to help young people be better, in this case at football, and grow in their skill development. It gives us the opportunity to meet (the players). It's not restricted to only schools up north can go down to the south. 

"Listen, it's something that I don't see what the problem is in having our coaches being able to go to different parts of the country and participate in camps to help these kids grow, and give us the opportunity and them an opportunity to connect with more coaches across the country and to develop their skills and display their skills at at the same time."


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