ACC Efficiency Ratings

Yesterday we broke down the efficiency of NC State's players in the Boston College game and through the first sixteen games of the season. Here is a look at how some of the ACC's top players have performed so far for comparison purposes.

A quick way NBA coaches measure a player's game performance is by evaluating his efficiency. In order to find a player's efficiency the following formula is used:

((Points + Rebounds + Assists + Steals + Blocks) - ((Field Goals Att. - Field Goals Made) + (Free Throws Att. - Free Throws Made) + Turnovers))

For example, compare the following stat lines:

Player A: 17 points (5-of-22 FG, 7-9 FT), 8 rebounds, 6 assists, 3 steals, 4 turnovers

Player B: 15 points (5-8 FG, 3-4 FT), 4 rebounds, 7 assists, 2 turnovers

Who had the better game? Using the NBA formula player B, who hit five of eight shots and committed two turnovers registered a +20 efficiency total while Player A who missed 17 shots and had four turnovers had just a +11 rating.

Yesterday we broke down the efficiency of NC State's players in the Wisconsin game and through the first six games of the season. Here is a look at how some of the ACC's top players have performed so far for comparison purposes.

EFFICIENCY COMPARISONS: ACC STANDOUTS

Here's a look at some season efficiency ratings and efficiency-per-minute ratings by some of the top players in the ACC. It is also a gauage for how NC State's players compare.

SEASON EFFICIENCY RATINGS (OVERALL)
Reggie Jackson (BC): +373 (21.9)
Jordan Williams (UMD): +345 (21.6)
Nolan Smith (Duke): +324 (20.3)
Chris Singleton (FSU): +327 (19.2)
Jerai Grant (Clemson): +327 (19.2)
Reggie Johnson (MIA): +301 (18.8)
Jeff Allen (VT): +259 (17.3)
Kyle Singler (Duke): +271 (16.9)
Corey Raji (BC): +254 (16.9)
Tyler Zeller (UNC): +272 (17.0)
Malcolm Delaney (VT): +251 (16.7)
Iman Shumpert (GT): +244 (16.3)
Travis McKie (WFU): +272 (16.0)
John Henson (UNC):+231 (14.4)
Durand Scott (MIA): +225 (14.1)
Glen Rice (GT): +206 (13.7)
Tracy Smith: +81 (13.5)
Joe Trapani (BC): +222 (13.1)
Demontez Stitt (Clemson): +197 (13.1)
Malcolm Grant (MIA): +208 (13.0)
Richard Howell: +196 (12.3)
C.J. Leslie: +187 (11.7)
Scott Wood: +185 (11.6)
Bernard James (FSU): +192 (11.3)
Lorenzo Brown: +175 (10.9)
Mustafa Farrakhan (UVA): +163 (10.2)
Harrison Barnes (UNC): +162 (10.1)

SEASON EFFICIENCY RATINGS (GUARDS)
Reggie Jackson (BC): +373 (21.9)
Nolan Smith (Duke): +324 (20.3)
Malcolm Delaney (VT): +228 (16.7)
Iman Shumpert (GT): +244 (16.3)
Durand Scott (MIA): +225 (14.1)
Glen Rice (GT): +206 (13.7)
Demontez Stitt (Clemson): +197 (13.1)
Malcolm Grant (MIA): +208 (13.0)
Lorenzo Brown: +175 (10.9)
Mustafa Farrakhan (UVA): +163 (10.2)

SEASON EFFICIENCY RATINGS (FORWARDS)
Chris Singleton (FSU): +327 (19.2)
Jeff Allen (VT): +254 (17.3)
Kyle Singler (Duke): +271 (16.9)
Corey Raji (BC): +254 (16.9)
Travis McKie (WFU): +272 (16.0)
John Henson (UNC):+231 (14.4)
Joe Trapani (BC): +222 (13.1)
Richard Howell: +196 (12.3)
C.J. Leslie: +187 (11.7)
Scott Wood: +185 (11.6)
Harrison Barnes (UNC): +162 (10.1)

SEASON EFFICIENCY RATINGS (CENTERS)
Jordan Williams (UMD): +345 (21.6)
Jerai Grant (Clemson): +327 (19.2)
Reggie Johnson (MIA): +301 (18.8)
Tyler Zeller (UNC): +272 (17.0)
Tracy Smith: +81 (13.5)
Bernard James (FSU): +192 (11.3)

OBSERVATIONS: No surprise that Reggie Jackson leads the ACC in efficiency as his numbers have been outstanding. Playing for a team that relies on him each night out and he's the focus of opposing defenses, Jackson is tied for the league in scoring (19.5) with Nolan Smith while shooting an astounding 56% from the field, which leads the league. He is also second in assists, ninth in free throw percentage, and is hitting 49% of his three's, which leads the league.

Not far behind Jackson are Maryland's Jordan Williams and Duke's Nolan Smith, who do it differently. Smith leads the league in scoring and assists, while Williams is fifth in scoring (17.7) and is the only player to average double-digit rebounds (12.1).

Chris Singleton is at the top because of his ability to fill the stat sheet. Singleton is No. 6 in scoring, No. 5 in rebounds, No. 5 in field goal percentage, No. 2 in steals, and No. 6 in blocked shots.

Jerai Grant and Reggie Johnson are the surprises in the top six. The two centers do it differently but are similar as well. Both shoot a high field goal percentage and rebound at a high rate. Grant is one of the league's best shot blockers and Johnson is strong at the free throw line, a stat that normally drops the efficiency of big men.

When you observe the numbers by position it gives a clear picture as to who have truly stood out early. Jackson and Smith have easily been the top guards, with Malcolm Delaney behind them due to his low rebounding numbers and field goal percentage and high number of turnovers.

Singleton headlines the forwards, with Jeff Allen, Kyle Singler, and Corey Raji behind them. Raji is unique in that he produces as the sixth man for the Eagles.

The centers are led by Williams, Johnson, and Grant. Efficiency is a stat big men tend to do well because of the equal weight distributed to rebounds, blocks, assists, and steals. Also, big men normally shoot better from the field with a higher number of field goal attempts, have a lower number of turnovers, and if you find a post player that can shoot well from the free throw line that is an added bonus.

PER MINUTE SEASON EFFICIENCY RATINGS (OVERALL)
Reggie Johnson (MIA): 18.8 per game efficiency -- .82 efficiency per minute
Jerai Grant (Clemson): 19.2 per game efficiency -- .75 efficiency per minute
Jordan Williams (UMD): 21.6 per game efficiency -- .70 efficiency per minute
Richard Howell: 12.3 per game efficiency -- .70 efficiency per minute

Reggie Jackson (BC): 21.9 per game efficiency -- .64 efficiency per minute
Nolan Smith (Duke): 20.3 per game efficiency -- .63 efficiency per minute Chris Singleton (FSU): 19.2 per game efficiency -- .63 efficiency per minute
Tyler Zeller (UNC): 17.0 per game efficiency -- .63 efficiency per minute
John Henson (UNC): 14.4 per game efficiency -- .63 efficiency per minute
Corey Raji (BC): 16.9 per game efficiency -- .61 efficiency per minute
Bernard James (FSU): 11.3 per game efficiency -- .61 efficiency per minute
Jeff Allen (VT): 17.3 per game efficiency -- .58 efficiency per minute
Iman Shumpert (GT): 16.3 per game efficiency -- .54 efficiency per minute
Travis McKie (WFU): 16.0 per game efficiency -- .54 efficiency per minute
Tracy Smith: 13.5 per game efficiency -- .54 efficiency per minute

Kyle Singler (Duke): 16.9 per game efficiency -- .51 efficiency per minute
Glen Rice (GT): 13.7 per game efficiency -- .48 efficiency per minute
C.J. Leslie: 11.7 per game efficiency -- .48 efficiency per minute

Joe Trapani (BC): 13.1 per game efficiency -- .46 efficiency per minute
Durand Scott (MIA): 14.1 per game efficiency -- .45 efficiency per minute
Malcolm Delaney (VT): 16.7 per game efficiency -- .44 efficiency per minute
Demontez Stitt (Clemson): 13.1 per game efficiency -- .43 efficiency per minute
Malcolm Grant (MIA): 13.0 per game efficiency -- .41 efficiency per minute
Ryan Harrow: 8.8 per game efficiency -- .39 efficiency per minute
Lorenzo Brown: 10.9 per game efficiency -- .37 efficiency per minute
Harrison Barnes (UNC): 10.1 per game efficiency -- .37 efficiency per minute
Mustafa Farrakhan (UVA): 10.2 per game efficiency -- .36 efficiency per minute

PER MINUTE SEASON EFFICIENCY RATINGS (GUARDS)
Reggie Jackson (BC): 21.9 per game efficiency -- .64 efficiency per minute
Nolan Smith (Duke): 20.3 per game efficiency -- .63 efficiency per minute
Iman Shumpert (GT): 16.3 per game efficiency -- .54 efficiency per minute
Glen Rice (GT): 13.7 per game efficiency -- .48 efficiency per minute
Durand Scott (MIA): 14.1 per game efficiency -- .45 efficiency per minute
Malcolm Delaney (VT): 16.3 per game efficiency -- .44 efficiency per minute
Demontez Stitt (Clemson): 13.1 per game efficiency -- .43 efficiency per minute
Malcolm Grant (MIA): 13.0 per game efficiency -- .41 efficiency per minute
Ryan Harrow: 8.8 per game efficiency -- .39 efficiency per minute
Lorenzo Brown: 10.9 per game efficiency -- .37 efficiency per minute

Mustafa Farrakhan (UVA): 10.2 per game efficiency -- .36 efficiency per minute

PER MINUTE SEASON EFFICIENCY RATINGS (FORWARDS)
Richard Howell: 12.3 per game efficiency -- .70 efficiency per minute

Chris Singleton (FSU): 19.2 per game efficiency -- .63 efficiency per minute
John Henson (UNC): 13.9 per game efficiency -- .63 efficiency per minute
Corey Raji (BC): 16.9 per game efficiency -- .61 efficiency per minute
Jeff Allen (VT): 18.1 per game efficiency -- .58 efficiency per minute
Travis McKie (WFU): 16.0 per game efficiency -- .54 efficiency per minute
Kyle Singler (Duke): 16.9 per game efficiency -- .51 efficiency per minute
C.J. Leslie: 11.7 per game efficiency -- .48 efficiency per minute

Joe Trapani (BC): 13.1 per game efficiency -- .46 efficiency per minute
Harrison Barnes (UNC): 10.5 per game efficiency -- .37 efficiency per minute

PER MINUTE SEASON EFFICIENCY RATINGS (CENTERS)
Reggie Johnson (MIA): 18.8 per game efficiency -- .82 efficiency per minute
Jerai Grant (Clemson): 19.2 per game efficiency -- .75 efficiency per minute
Jordan Williams (UMD): 21.6 per game efficiency -- .70 efficiency per minute
Tyler Zeller (UNC): 15.3 per game efficiency -- .63 efficiency per minute
Bernard James (FSU): 11.3 per game efficiency -- .61 efficiency per minute
Tracy Smith: 13.5 per game efficiency -- .54 efficiency per minute

OBSERVATIONS: This is where the surprises come in as efficiency per minute gives an idea of just how productive a player is related to his time on the court. Not many folks would think that Reggie Johnson would lead this category, but he does based on the players we charted.

How does Johnson do it? First off he's productive. He averages 12.3 points, 9.7 rebounds, and also has 12 steals and 19 blocks. What makes Johnson unique is that the 303-pounder is shooting 59% from the field AND 73% from the free throw line. Jordan Williams, No. 3 in this ranking, is shooting just 52% from the free throw line. Finally, Johnson does all his damage while playing just 22.9 minutes per night (Williams is averaging 30.9 minutes per night). Given his production in that limited amount of time, it's easy to see why Johnson grades out so well on a per-minute basis.

Grant comes in at No. 2 for many of the same reasons as Johnson. In fact, the main difference in the two is that Johnson rebounds better (Grant averages just 6.9 rebounds) and plays less minutes (Grant plays 25.5 minutes per night, which is still five less than Williams). Grant's impact defensively is much greater than Johnson and Williams as he has already totaled 21 steals and 44 blocks.

The biggest surprise has to be No. 4 in the rankings, NC State's Richard Howell. Howell climbed up this list because he only plays 17.6 minutes a night. He still averages nearly the same amount of rebounds as Grant, shoots 56% from the field, and has more steals than Johnson and Williams. Howell is the No. 1 forward based on efficiency per minute.

Big men dominate this last as well because they normally play less minutes than guards. Reggie Jackson and Nolan Smith come in at No. 5 and No. 6 and they play 34.1 and 32.2 minutes respectively. In fact, Jackson and Smith are the only two guards in the top 12.

Other players who rate out higher than expected on a per minute basis are Bernard James, Corey Raji, and Iman Shumpert.


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