Part I: Troy Walters Q&A

RALEIGH, N.C. -- Monday was the first day in the office for new NC State wide receivers coach Troy Walters, and he took time out of his busy schedule to answer some questions from Pack Pride. Here is part I of our exclusive Q&A.

Monday was the first day in the office for new NC State wide receivers coach Troy Walters, and he took time out of his busy schedule to answer some questions from Pack Pride.

Here is part I of our exclusive Q&A with Walters, an eight-year NFL veteran who spent the last two seasons coaching that same position at Texas A&M, was the recipient of the 1999 Biletnikoff Trophy, given to the nation's top collegiate wide receiver.

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When did you decide that coaching was a profession you wanted to get involved with?
I knew early on, my father was a long-time coach. My goal was to play professionally in the NFL and then get into coaching. Along the way I've been blessed to be around some great coaches that I've been able to take things from and sort of learn the profession. The transition for me was pretty easy.

When your playing career was over, what were some of the things you learned as a player that you've brought to your coaching career?
The main thing was how to develop players, the drill work that I learned while I was playing. Just the understanding that everyone learns differently and as a coach you have to be able to adapt to different personalities. Those things have made the transition easier.

Talk about your time at Texas A&M.
I learned a lot from Coach Sherman, he gave me the opportunity to begin my career as a receivers coach. I learned a lot about attention to detail from Coach Sherman, he was very detail-oriented with everything he did throughout the program.

That's one of the things I pride myself in, focusing on the details and making sure my players know the details of the offense and what we're trying to do. Coach Sherman is a great offensive mind, what we did schematically was some of the best stuff I've been around.

Since not much has been released about your hire, can you describe what that process was like and how you ended up at NC State?
It was funny, because at the end of May I was looking on the football scoop and saw that NC State was trying to hire a receiver coach. I know Desmond Kitchings from our time in Indianapolis.

I gave him a call and told him I'd be interested and to get my name to Dana Bible and Coach O'Brien. He called back shortly after and told me to give Coach Bible a call. We talked extensively and he wanted to know if I had interest.

I didn't hear back from him for three weeks, and then I got a call from Coach Bible wanting to know if I was still interested. Coach O'Brien gave me a call and told me they wanted to fly me out and interview me. I flew out, interviewed with the offensive and defensive staff, and at the end of that day they offered me the position and I accepted.

Coach Kitchings said one of the things that appealed to him about NC State was the location. Was that important to you? Did you know much about the Triangle?
I didn't know much about Raleigh, but I've heard nothing but good things. When I got here, I learned how passionate the fans are. That's exciting. You're also close to the beach, I'm a water guy. I also like to play golf and I hear golf around here is second to none.

My wife has been here and absolutely loves Raleigh, and from what I've seen and experienced it's a great place.

What are your early impressions of Coach O'Brien?
Things are fairly new, but he's a great man, a great coach. His track record speaks for itself. His record shows, he has the third best winning percentage in the ACC. He comes from a military background, and I think a coach like that is great to work for.

How much does having experience as an offensive coordinator help you as a receivers coach?
You know the whole offense, the schemes. That really helps. It only helps as a position coach because you know what your players need to do and you can give them a bigger picture of the offense.


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