NCAA's Amended Notice of Allegations Lessens UNC Charges

North Carolina received the revised allegations on Monday afternoon.

READ THE AMENDED NOA HERE

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. – The NCAA removed its charge of impermissible benefits related to the University of North Carolina’s irregular African and Afro-American (AFAM) Studies courses in its amended notice of allegations delivered to the institution on Monday.

The NCAA also pulled all references to the men’s basketball and football programs in the new set of five allegations. The NCAA replaced the impermissible benefits allegation from the initial notice of allegations with a failure to monitor academic support charge.

“We are carefully reviewing the amended notice of allegations resulting from our joint investigation with the NCAA and will respond with facts and evidence that present a full picture of our case,” said UNC athletics director Bubba Cunningham. “The University takes these allegations extremely seriously. We remain committed to cooperating fully with the NCAA while working tirelessly to secure a fair outcome for Carolina.”

The five updated allegations are as follows ... 

1. [NCAA Division I Manual Bylaws 10.1, 10.1-(c) and 16.11.2.1 (2003-04 through 2010-11)] It is alleged that from February 2003 to July 20101, Jan Boxill (Boxill), then philosophy instructor, director of the Parr Center for Ethics, women's basketball athletic academic counselor in the Academic Support Program for Student Athletes and chair of the faculty, knowingly provided extra benefits in the form of impermissible academic assistance and special arrangements to women's basketball student-athletes.

2. [NCAA Division I Manual Bylaws 10.1, 10.1-(a) and 19.2.3 (2014-15)] It is alleged that in 2014 and 2015, Deborah Crowder (Crowder), former student services manager in the African and Afro-American Studies department, violated the NCAA principles of ethical conduct when she failed to furnish information relevant to an investigation of possible violations of NCAA legislation when requested to do so by the NCAA enforcement staff and the institution. Specifically, Crowder refused to participate in an interview with both the institution and the enforcement staff despite at least three requests for her participation.

3. [NCAA Division I Manual Bylaws 10.1, 10.1-(a) and 19.2.3 (2014-15)] It is alleged that in 2014 and 2015, Dr. Julius Nyang'oro (Nyang'oro), former professor and chair of the African and Afro-American Studies department, violated the NCAA principles of ethical conduct when he failed to furnish information relevant to an investigation of possible violations of NCAA legislation when requested to do so by the NCAA enforcement staff and the institution. Specifically, Nyang'oro refused to participate in an interview with both the institution and the enforcement staff despite at least five requests for his participation.

4. [NCAA Division I Manual Constitution 2.8.1 (2005-06 through 2010-11)] It is alleged that from the 2005 fall semester and continuing through the 2011 summer semester, the institution violated the NCAA Principle of Rules Compliance when individuals in the athletics and academic administrations on campus, particularly in the college of arts and sciences, did not sufficiently monitor the Academic Support Program for Student-Athletes (ASPSA) and the African and Afro-American Studies (AFRI/AFAM) department. 

5. [NCAA Division I Manual Constitution 2.1.1, 2.8.1 and 6.01.1 (2005-06 through 2010-11)] It is alleged that the scope and nature of the allegations set forth in Allegation Nos. 1 and 4 demonstrate that the institution violated the NCAA Principle of Institutional Control and Responsibility when individuals in the athletics and academic administrations on campus, particularly in the college of arts and sciences, did not identify or investigate anomalous courses offered by the African and Afro-American Studies (AFRI/AFAM) department and students', including student-athletes', enrollment in such courses.

The NCAA reopened its 2011 investigation of academic irregularities in the AFAM department in June 2014. UNC received its initial notice of allegations last May, which consistent of five potential Level I infractions, indicating a severe breach of conduct.

UNC submitted new information pertaining to Boxill and potential recruiting violations in men’s soccer on Aug. 10, 2015, thereby delaying the process and prompting the need for an amended notice. Both UNC and the NCAA initially indicated their confidence in resolving the matter by October.

University officials and all alleged individuals involved will have 90 days to respond to the amended notice. The NCAA enforcement staff will then have 60 days to prepare its own response to the Committee on Infractions, which will hear the case at a time yet to be determined.


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