Frome Knows It's His Turn

The two-a-days have begun and the Irish football team is moving along in its preparation for the Pittsburgh Panthers on September 3rd. Senior defensive end Chris Frome knows this preseason camp is football all day every day.

"It's harder on our bodies," Frome said. "You get to zoom in on football. There's no real meetings or lag time. It's just practice to lunch to meetings to practice again. Everything from the first practice can carry over to the second practice. You don't really have time to make a mistake. It's just instinct. That second practice, you know what you have work on."

Frome will have a lot of things to work on this season. The senior is expected to see significant action at defensive end after spending the first three years of his career mostly on the bench. He has been waiting for this opportunity for a long time.

"Everyone prepares themselves for this position," Frome said. "I've been ready for it. We've had a lot talent here on the defensive line. It's just a big role to fill. I understand that seeing all the guys come through here. I just have to keep that tradition alive. We're a power football team and I don't want to get away from that. That's how I look at my role. I want to keep up that position and the tradition going."

Frome had a phenomenal spring camp. He capped it off with a monster effort in the Blue-Gold game with 2.5 sacks and three tackles for loss. Frome, along with the rest of the defense, have spent a busy first week soaking up the new schemes of defensive coordinator Rick Minter.

"I'm not disappointed at all," Minter said with his group grasping the plays and formations. "The learning curve is still pretty much up there because of information saturation. But I really give the kids credit. They've handled a lot of stuff. Not only our stuff, because I call this a multiple defense, you have to correlate that to a very sound, sophisticated offensive style. You have to match that up. I think our kids have handled a lot on a shirt period of time."

Frome said the first day was tough but he sees vast improvement as the week has progressed. Another thing that has progressed is the daily battle between the offensive line and defensive line. The intense competition has been beneficial for both sides.

"It's gotten a lot more intense but it's all good fun," Frome said. "Coach (Weis) constantly reminds us that we are one team. We're just making ourselves better. That's basically what happens in camp. You don't have anyone to hit except for the offensive line. There gets to be a rivalry there. But we got to take care of our guys. That's our teammates we're hitting out there."

The defensive line was stingy versus the run last season. The Irish as a team gave up only 88 yards per game on the ground, forcing many teams to give up their running game and focus solely on the pass. Frome knows this tough run defense is part of the Notre Dame tradition.

"That's football," Frome said. "You have to shut down the run. If teams can run, then you really don't have a defense against them. The first step is shutting down the run. Next is don't give up the long ball. We're trying to learn all that camp. It's the same defensive mentality, real aggressive. We're trying to keep up those numbers from rushing defense and improve our passing game from last year."

Head coach Charlie Weis said this week the sign of a good team is the ability to be flexible from a position standpoint. The Irish are not deep on the defensive line experience-wise. Players that can learn the nuances of another position and fill in when the time calls is critical in a team's success, Weis said. Frome has seen the coaches putting players in the best position for the Irish to win this season.

"They are moving guys around playing both sides trying to create some depth for us," Frome said. "It's obviously going to be beneficial. I saw that a lot with the Patriots. I don't know if it's going to work here as much but they find their players and put them in spots to be a winning team."


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