Matt Kegel will follow in the footsteps of several family members by attending Oklahoma State

Standout offensive lineman Matt Kegel had been committed to his home state Minnesota Gophers for nearly a year but given the opportunity to follow a family tradition and attend Oklahoma State made him have a change of mind.

Tis the season to be jolly and one of the holiday traditions of 2016 recruiting in Division I football has been some December changes of heart and mind. The Oklahoma State Cowboys were a victim of it Sunday when quarterback commit Nick Starkel, committed to OSU for nine months, decided to open up his recruiting. There were at least two other big name quarterbacks that changed their commitments.

On Wednesday, however, Oklahoma State benefitted from a switch as offensive lineman Matt Kegel of Chaska, Minn., switched from the home state Golden Gophers to the Cowboys. It may seem a little strange, but Kegel has orange blood running through his body.

"My mom is a graduate (of Oklahoma State)," Kegel stated and kept on stating. "My grandpa is a graduate, my great grandpa is a graduate, my uncle is a graduate, my cousin went there for a year and then switched to Ole Miss. My aunt went there, and I think I have named most of them. I had a second uncle that went there. I've had family from all over that has gone there."

Now the 6-6, 305-pound bulldozing offensive blocker will push his way down to Stillwater. Kegel is a loyal and true guy, which will make him a strong fit as a Cowboy, but for a long time he was also loyal to the Golden Gophers, present and future. He did things right with his communication and de-commitment on Tuesday night but it was anything but easy. 

"I kind of been through the ringer with all my guys (2016 commits for Minnesota) so we went on cabin trips together and I've been committed to them for over a year now," Kegel revealed when asked about his relationship to Minnesota. "It was really hard to do and especially to talk to my recruiting coach because I know him so well, but he understood completely. He said, 'I understand that if you are not 100 percent committed that you have to do what is best for you and I respect that and I will be cheering for you all the way.'  It wasn't easy and I had to be 100 percent to be able to do this."

Kegel admits to being passionate about anything he is involved in and he lamented that he couldn't get Chaska to a state title run this season, but they did well with a 7-3 record and a 5-1 record in conference play. He has earned the distinction of being the second-rated offensive guard prospect in the state of Minnesota. He is a three-star prospect with Scout.

He can't wait to make his official visit on Jan. 14 and get a chance to meet the class he already identifies as #Stillysquad2016.

"That campus has beautiful big brick buildings and gardens and I wanted to go to a school that had a classic college campus," he said. "The football program is to match and it is outstanding. I can't wait to see what our class can do and I can't wait to meet those guys and really get to know them. This team this year was really young and to go 10-2 and make it to the Sugar Bowl is great and I want to have it go up from there."

As far as a player, how does Kegel describe himself as a player? How about a scouting report?

"You've seen the film and I'm just going to keep driving and driving until the whistle blows," Kegel said. "I'm driving so long that some of the guys (I block) think that it is illegal. I play to the echo of the whistle and I'm going to keep doing that as long as I can and keep getting bigger and stronger and hope that I can make guys (I'm blocking) angry at the next level too. I want to get them in a little bit of trouble with their coaches."

Nice guy off the field but Kegel has a little nasty going on the field. I like offensive linemen with a little bit of defensive attitude. He is now the 18th commitment for Oklahoma State and don't be surprised if the Cowboys don't take on more offensive lineman and end up signing six in the class.


GoPokes Top Stories