Pat Kinnison

Key Projects For Rob Glass In The Offseason

Rob Glass and the Oklahoma State strength and conditioning staff have proven year in and year out that they are capable of developing players in the offseason. Here are six projects that Glass and his staff will focus on this spring.

The offseason workouts are underway and have been for several weeks as Rob Glass and his staff have control of the squad leading the way toward the start of spring football on Monday, March 7. Head coach Mike Gundy has always identified Glass as one of the most important, if not the most important, members of the football staff when it comes to the success of the program.

Glass is often promoted as one of the primary reasons that Cowboys football has taken off and had the success of 10 straight bowl games and winning 76 games in the past eight seasons, an average of 9.4 wins a season. 

We have seen Glass take two- and three-star players and push their physical prowess and skills into playing like four- and five-star players. We've seen Glass taking willing hard workers and turn them from good college players into NFL Draft prospects and seen them go on to become productive NFL veterans. 

Each year when the key offseason period comes around there are players and positions identified that need the "Glass touch," which is anything but gentile. It is a iron busting approach to getting bigger and stronger or can be an aerobic and technique heavy approach to shaving a tenth or two off speed. The program is a combination of lifting, aerobic and condition driven drills, as well as work on pure athleticism and agility. 

Here are some projects that we see for Glass and his staff between now and the start of spring football. 

1. Where is the beef? Find it for some offensive linemen
There is no doubt that the offensive line is looking to improve and looking for more players to compete for playing time. There are three young offensive linemen that have the ability to do that but need to finish off some in the weight room to have the necessary size and strength to compete. The coaching staff loves recently red-shirted freshman Marcus Keyes from Louisiana. He was kept with the top offensive linemen and made road trips in the fall. He has an NFL lineage with his father. He was also listed at 6-4, 280 pounds in the fall. He grew and is probably in pretty good shape but that frame of his needs to carry 300 pounds, maybe a few over, into the spring. 

West Texas tough Johnny Wilson is another red-shirt freshman who is capable of jumping in for a piece of the offensive line pie, and at 6-3, 297 he is close. He needs to be shown his optimum size, get there and learn how to hold it. A lot of the work with these guys can also be combined with nutritionist Charles Hewitt in how to stay at the right weight. 

Finally, a slightly older player in Matthew Mucha. The red-shirt sophomore-to-be is 6-6, but he has lingered around 285 pounds. He needs to get pushed up if at all possible. If not, a drop down and work as a Cowboy back would be the option. Everybody would prefer to see Mucha get above 300 and compete for time at tackle.

2. Looking for a bigger Carr
Gundy saw Temple, Texas running back Jeff Carr on tape and loved how his speed and moves exploded for big plays. The only drawback is Carr is 5-7, 170 pounds and he gets overwhelmed some physically by the competition. Even at that he played as a freshman and scored three touchdowns. If Glass can put some solid muscle on that 5-7 frame, Carr doesn't need much, but what he needs has to be efficient. A 5-7, 180-185 pound Carr could be a major weapon in the Oklahoma State offense. 

3. Power kicks
The head coach said during the bowl season that he would like to find a kicker that put the ball out of the back of the end zone or at least deep in the end zone on kickoffs. Oklahoma State and Cowboys fans were very spoiled on kickoffs with Quinn Sharp, who won three College Football Performance Awards in a row for kickoffs and touchbacks. It is pretty certain that Ben Grogan is not going to master that and Grogan needs to focus on his PAT and field goal work. That leaves Matthew Hockett and @Matt Ammendola, two very talented walk-ons that have the leg strength to do it but need more power to do it as consistently as Gundy wants. Glass and his staff have had a lot of success in working with kickers and punters on strength and conditioning, which is not always easy. They have proven methods and if either or both Hockett and Ammendola buy in then the Cowboys could get back to being spoiled on kickoffs again. 
  
4. Prepare Kolar
J.W. Walsh is gone and after a red-shirt season the 6-4, 190-pound John Kolar needs to be ready to compete with Taylor Cornelius in the spring and with incoming freshman Keondre Wudtee in the summer and fall for the backup quarterback position. Kolar is a talent but he needs to fill out that frame. This offseason, actually Kolar's second in the program, will be a key time for that. 

5. Rehab Burton
A real positive is that Oklahoma State ended the regular season with very few injured players that were going to need postseason surgery or lengthy rehabs toward spring. About the worst was star linebacker Jordan Burton, who had an aggravated ankle injury and various assorted other bumps and pains. Glass is very good at combining offseason work so as to allow players with extensive injuries to rehab and get back into form for spring football.
 
6. An X-factor for the defensive line
There are always young players that need the weight room and need to physically develop in order to take the next step toward really helping the Cowboys on the field. We documented the offensive linemen but one tht we are fascinated with and we think could be a fantastic player is Louis Brown, remember the 6-5, 212-pound running back, tight end, wide receiver, defensive end, linebacker, and safety from Burton, Texas that de-committed from Texas, yes the Longhorns, and committed to Oklahoma State last year and was part of the 2015 recruiting class. Get Brown through an offseason and get that 6-5 frame loaded up around 235 to 240 pounds and let's see what he can do.

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