TCU Dominant At Home

TCU's senior class of football players started something that will have to continue in order for the #7 ranked Frogs to have future success. The Oklahoma Sooners, Texas Longhorns and USC Trojans all have it and now TCU does as well. ‘It' is a dominant home-field advantage.

TCU's senior class of football players started something that will have to continue in order for the #7 ranked Frogs to have future success. The Oklahoma Sooners, Texas Longhorns and USC Trojans all have it and now TCU does as well. ‘It' is a dominant home-field advantage.

The Frogs hardly ever have an intimidating crowd, numbers wise, at Amon G. Carter Stadium like the others do in their backyards. But the team has been a virtual lock to win in Fort Worth over the last four seasons.

Since 2005, Gary Patterson's squad is 21-2 at home, the stadium Coach Patterson has referred to as "The Carter." In that time, the Frogs have beaten two ranked teams in Texas Tech (2006) and #9 BYU (2008). On Sept. 15th, 2005, the Utah Utes, owners of the nation's longest winning streak at 18 games, came into Fort Worth and exited with a 23-20 overtime loss.

A year later, TCU battered a young Graham Harrell's Red Raiders, winning a game in which the Frogs only scored 12 points. Thanks to a dominating defensive effort, it was plenty of scoring as Tech managed to "light up" the board with a measly three points. The Red Raiders were held without a touchdown for only the second time in 79 games under head coach Mike Leach.

Fast forward to this season and those who showed up to watch the Horned Frogs witnessed a home team that wanted to not just beat its opponent, but send them away with their tail between their legs. In going 6-0, the Frogs won by an average of 35.5 points per game. The most points any team was able to score against Dick Bumpas's defense was 14 against Stanford. Seven of those points came when Frogs' punter Anson Kelton had a punt blocked and scooped up for a Cardinal touchdown.

A lot of fans have been disappointed with the school's inability to have a packed house on game day. While that would be a great sight to see, Patterson's Frogs have shown that they don't need a sold-out stadium to get fired up for a game. However, anyone who watched the Frogs lose in Salt Lake City on Nov. 6 knows that a fired up crowd can be the winning difference in a tight game. 50,000 Ute fans dressed in black made a difference in a game the Utes needed two missed field goals and a last minute drive to squeak by TCU, 13-10.

One Frog team that has made a miraculous turnaround is Jim Christian's men's basketball team. A year after finishing with 14 wins, the Frogs' head coach has his team sitting at 11-5, including a 2-0 mark in conference with wins over Colorado State and UNLV. Daniel Meyer-Coliseum has been rocking lately, with the crowd becoming a factor in the team's 7-1 start at home.

Christian is happy that fans and students have started coming to games. Over the last several seasons, the Frogs' play has not been up to par and the students and fans have voiced their displeasure by not even showing up.

After Sunday's 80-73 win over UNLV, a game in which attendance reached 4,000 people, Christian had good things to say about the crowd.

""It was great to see the students come out and support this team," he said. "To hear people chant TCU in this building is rewarding. It's hopefully something we can build on. When you get crowds like that, the players feed off their energy."

Let the good times roll and hopefully the fans will roll in to watch the Frogs dominate.


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