Booth Review

Cody Booth took a chance once, joining the Temple University football program as a walk-on tight end. He worked his way up the depth chart until becoming the starter last year. Now he's taking another leap of faith, trying to gain weight and make the transition from starting tight end to starting left tackle this spring.

Cody Booth took a chance once, joining the Temple University football program as a walk-on tight end.

He worked his way up the depth chart until becoming the starter last year.

Now he's taking another leap of faith, trying to gain weight and make the transition from starting tight end to starting left tackle this spring.

Both he and coach Matt Rhule admit the move is tentative based on Booth's ability to gain enough size to manage the position.

"We're setting goals right now with my weight, and you can't just snap your fingers," said Booth. "I'm 265 now, I'm trying to get to 278 at the end of spring, and then in the offseason and summer gain weight and get to 290-295. When we get there, we'll see what my conditioning level is.

"I'm picking up the offense pretty good, as far as tackle goes. It's just putting on weight fast enough, and I want it to be good weight. I don't want it to be bad weight."

Coach Matt Rhule's wife is a nutritionist at the school, so Booth feels he has a reliable contact. So far, he admits the amount of food he is consuming has been a challenge.

"It's a lot of discomfort, trust me," said Booth. "It's hard to sleep at night. You have to eat when you wake up, then snack, then lunch, then snack again, then another snack, then dinner, then snack, then dinner again, then another snack.

"It hasn't slowed me down yet. It's a lot of protein, a lot of pasta, heavy stuff that will sit there and hold you. But I believe I can do it, I saw guys do it before, that inspire me like (former Temple tight end Steve) Maneri."

Like Booth, Maneri came to Temple at around 210 pounds. He graduated at 285 and has played both offensive tackle and tight end in the NFL.

"He's one of the first guys I talked to about it and he told me definitely do it, he did it in the NFL," said Booth. "He just told me eat a lot and work hard in the weight room. He told me the steps to go through. Basically he said good luck, he was happy with the decision and if I need anything just ask him."

Booth said the decision didn't come lightly.

"The past couple weeks we talked about it more and decided to go for it," said Booth. "I guess it was just a lot of looking at our team now and what we needed. It was a tough choice. It wasn't just my choice, I talked to my family about it. It was a big decision in my life."

Rhule said he decided to take a chance on Booth making the transition because he had two other senior tight ends in Alex Jackson and Chris Parthemore and a lack of depth on the offensive line.

"Our offensive line coach Allen Mogridge did the same thing, he was a 260-pound tight end and played his senior year on the offensive line at 310," said Rhule. "I don't know if Cody can do it, but he's done everything we've ever asked.

"Can he put on 20 pounds this summer? Absolutely. Can he get to 295-300? It's an experiment. He was a blocking tight end anyway, so if it doesn't work he can go back to his old structure."

As Booth continues with the transition, he becomes more confident this move will work out for the best.

"I know I can do it," said Booth. "As you know, under Steve (Addazio) and Al (Golden) we ran the ball a lot. The transition is a little different with the protections, but as far as the run game, it's pretty much the same, you're just one man in.

"Nothing's impossible. You set goals, you accomplish one goal and you work for something even better."

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