Raybon, The Next Star In The Skyline Pipeline

Every year Coach Samples at Skyline sends a handful of Div 1 talent to the next level.Looking ahead to the 2012 class, Samples feels like he has a stud receiver joining the varsity ranks next season. Tre Raybon is a 6-2, 180 pound physical receiver who is already garnering attention from top programs in the country as a sophomore. Websider's Taylor Hamm caught up with the man in charge at Skyline.

Every year Coach Samples at Skyline High School sends a handful of division 1 talent to the next level. He will continue that trend next season with Anthony Wallace and Frank Shannon just to name a few. Looking ahead to the 2012 class, Coach Samples feels like he has a stud receiver joining the varsity ranks next season. Tre Raybon is a 6-foot-2, 180 pound physical receiver who is already garnering attention from top programs in the country as a sophomore. Websider's Taylor Hamm caught up with the man in charge at Skyline for a scouting report on Raybon.

"Trey is a very smooth route runner and physical receiver. He likes to use his body with contact on the DB and shield the defender off. He gets out of the jam well. He is the type of receiver that allows us to use multiple formations when he is on the field. Meaning, we can line Tre up out wide, we can line him up at the slot, we can line him up as a hand on the ground tight end, and we can line him as a flex tight end. He likes to block and he does a lot of the little things well. He really plucks the ball out of the air when he catches. He is a hard worker and a yes sir/no sir type of kid. He has good character and very good in the classroom. I think right now he is a possession receiver that can take it the distance."

Tre will be making the leap to varsity next season and with that transition new challenges will arise. Coach Samples feels like Tre has the ability to make a smooth changeover.

"Being that he will be used at multiple positions, that he could be in different spots on any given play, and that he will be getting the entire playbook instead of the abbreviated one on the JV level, I think these will be his toughest challenges. I'm not going to say the speed of the game because once he gets a good grasp of how we are going to use him, he'll play fast. Right now it's about making sure he is in the right spot. Is he a receiver? Is he a flex tight end? Is he an on the ground tight end? He's been coming along well all spring. You can tell he is getting better at all these things as each day passes."

Coach Samples mentioned that they can use Tre at multiple positions on the offensive side of the ball, but he feels that Tre is meant to play one position at the next level.

"He is a receiver. For us at our level, he is such a physical blocker and receiver, he isn't afraid of contact, so we can put him at tight end. You can throw him on 15-yard digs between both safeties and let both hit him and he'll prance back up to the huddle and say give me some more. When you have that kind of kid, you try to use all of those physical attributes. A lot of times teams try to run tight ends on and off the field using different personnel packages. He just allows us to use all of those different personnel packages so people can't think that because he is in the game now we are going to be a running team. He is a receiver, he is not a tight end. He may be able to grow into an H-Back. He is a physical blocker that isn't afraid to mix it up either."

Leadership qualities vary from player to player. Coach Samples believes Tre's leadership is personified by his play on the field.

"Tre is more of a leader by example. You see Tre work hard, you see the way Tre works. It's no secret everyone can see how hard he works. Tre will be vocal when it is time for him to step up and be that type of leader."

Since Tre is so versatile on the field he will be apt to play in all types of offenses at the collegiate level. According to Coach Samples, he could see Tre fitting in almost anywhere.

"I think he can play in all of them. I think in the spread he is probably your outside receiver, as your bigger receiver, that you want in a match-up against a smaller corner. You can throw him the fade ball or the deep curl route or even the jump ball. He is a former basketball player. He actually gave up basketball to concentrate on football. I think he can be in the west coast with those quick slant routes. I like running slant routes with him because he uses his body so well to shield the cornerback off. I see him in the pro-style as well. Anytime you have a receiver that runs smooth routes, that catches the ball with his hands, and likes to be physical, I think he can play anywhere. He does a lot of things well colleges at the next level can use."


Aggie Digest Top Stories