I'm Still Seeing Double T's

The Texas Tech Football weight room is top notch. I've lifted in Stanford's weight room, and it doesn't even come close. Sorry Cardinal! As mentioned beforehand, even the weight plates and dumbbell are adorned with the red Double T logo. Raider Red Hammer Strength weight machines line the perimeter of the room, and various cardio machines face the window towards the practice field.

The Texas Tech Football weight room is top notch. I've lifted in Stanford's weight room, and it doesn't even come close. Sorry Cardinal! As mentioned beforehand, even the weight plates and dumbbell are adorned with the red Double T logo. Raider Red Hammer Strength weight machines line the perimeter of the room, and various cardio machines face the window towards the practice field.

"In the new weight room we can do so many things. In the old one you could hardly walk around everybody. Now you can have everybody in there and still have room to do some running inside the middle to warm up and jump rope," said senior slot receiver Trey Haverty on his favorite room in the new facility.

Treadmills, lifecycles, elliptical, spin bikes, upright bikes and most machines have built in television screens. My guess is to catch the morning rerun of SportsCenter while warming up for a 6 a.m. weight session with Strength and Conditioning Coach Bennie Wylie.

"Bennie [has] been with the Cowboys, so he knows what he's doing. He came in and brought a new attitude— something fresh. He's got us excited. Everyone works for him, respects him, loves him-so we work hard for him even though half the time we're dying," added Haverty.

The machines are divided by wide aisles providing room for the players to do a warm-up jog or walking lunges. Smith machines line the middle aisles and a large free weight area garners the far end of the room. In simple terms, a Smith machine is a barbell connected to runners placing an emphasis on one plane of movement, rather than the three planes required to balance and stabilize a freestanding bar.

Storage racks hold at least a dozen exercise balls as well as large bins of Bosu Balls. Anyone who spends a lot of time in a gym is aware of the latest training gismo called the Bosu Ball. In layman terms, the Bosu is an exercise ball sliced in half and mounted on a hard rubber platform. It has been at the forefront of balance and core training technology since its introduction into the fitness scene a few years ago.

Abdominal work in the form of various crunch styles can be done lying on the ball side of the Bosu. Flip the ball over and try doing pushups with hands on the edges of the platform. Not easy, huh?

Balancing one foot in the center of the ball while doing lunges or squats improves balance and challenges stabilizer muscles surrounding the knee and ankle joints. This is especially helpful after rehabilitation is completed and additional improvement on lateral movement is needed. Football players often make sharp cuts with quick directional changes during a game, placing importance on strong stabilizing muscles surrounding the joints of the lower extremities. Being a personal trainer I could go on for hours, but I'll stop.

The strength and conditioning coaches' offices and supplement room line the north side. Trust me, they've got plenty of Powerade.

The small corridor that connects the weight room with the locker room is lined with a wall of small lockers connected to the laundry drop.

The locker room is impressive. Like I said before, Double T's everywhere, including the bathroom. Coach Simmons claims it serves as a constant reminder to the players of what they represent and what they're a part of.

Additionally, former players can sponsor a locker and have a plaque above the locker with an inspirational quote or Bible verse. The one I walked by featured Philippians 4:13, "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me."

The locker room also houses a second set of hot and cold tubs. The room was empty except for a lone player taking a nap in the hot tub. I'm sure I surprised him when I came around the corner.

On the way out of the locker room, the players pass a glass case lined with trophies that serve as a reminder of the Texas Tech tradition they are now helping to continue. Seeing the evidence of hard work by the players before them is an extra reminder of the task at hand as they head out onto the field.

It's obvious that a lot of people sacrificed for this building to become a reality, and a lot of former players and alums gave generous donations to provide the players with such high quality resources.

Now I know why these players don't mind spending all day here, even during the off-season. I'm sure they have to kick a few of them out at the end of the day. No more ping pong, go do your homework.

The facility tour ends in the Marsha Sharp Center.

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