Breaking Down UCLA Commit Jaylen Hands

Sep. 17 -- Jaylen Hands, the nation's #21 prospect, is a huge pickup for UCLA. What kind of player is UCLA getting in Hands?

On Wednesday, UCLA received a commitment from 6-foot-2, 165-pound San Diego Balboa Prep point guard Jaylen Hands, giving the Bruins one of the nation's top point guards in 2017.

Hands, Scout's 21st ranked prospect in 2017 and 3rd-rated point guard, joins post Jalen Hilland small forward LiAngelo Ball in the Bruins' class.

What kind of player is UCLA landing in Hands?

First off, the five-star prospect has really impressive physical attributes. He already has above average size for a high-major point guard at 6-foot-2, but he's grown over the last year and his baby face suggest he could continue to get taller.

He also has pretty long arms, with a 6-foot-4 wingspan measured at the USA Basketball 16u Trials in June.

Hands is just starting to gain strength for the first time, and has plenty of room to grow into his frame. Already an above average athlete for the position, Hands should only improve athletically as he gets stronger.

He has good speed going up and down the court and is best in transition due to his ball skills, ability to change speeds and vision.

Hands has grown as a point guard over the last year and now has a very respectable mix of creating for teammates - he has good to very good vision - and looking to score. Earlier in his career, he would tend to be shoot-first, but his decision making has gone in the right direction.

His vision is impressive, but Hands is also a scorer. He's become a serious threat to score off the dribble and can knock down three-pointers off the catch and pull, mid-range pull-ups, floaters or attack the basket and finish with both hands.

With his ball skills and body control, Hands can create his own shot and is even adept at knocking down fade-away jumpers from all over the inside of the perimeter. He has a very quick first step that makes guarding him even more difficult.

Hands has the lateral quickness and instincts to ultimately be a very good defender, although he'll need to continue to assert himself on that end, like most high school players.

He's still inconsistent, but Hands' upside is extreme and at this stage in the process, he's an easy five-star prospect. His commitment is significant for the Bruins.

Something significant of note: If Hands comes to UCLA, he'll be the first true point guard from the high school ranks that UCLA has successfully recruited since Jerime Anderson in 2008.


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