Ernest Turner short on SAT Score..Hope Remains

<p>10 points are easy to come by on the basketball court for UNLV freshman-to-be Ernest Turner. Now he just wishes he could put up 10 more on his SAT score. Turner took the test with no time limit, due to the fact that he has a learning disability, and scored an 810 while needing an 820 to pass (one question short).<p>

10 points are easy to come by on the basketball court for UNLV freshman-to-be Ernest Turner. Now he just wishes he could put up 10 more on his SAT score. Turner took the test with no time limit, due to the fact that he has a learning disability, and scored an 810 while needing an 820 to pass (one question short). When in high school, Turner was diagnosed with a learning disability. While people with learning disabilities are afforded some privileges while taking the SAT, like having the test read to them and taking the test with more generous time constraints, the scoring is still the same. Fortunately for UNLV and Turner there is still a chance he'll be in a Rebel uniform this season.

UNLV has filed and appeal on his behalf to give Ernest full eligibility this season. Though UNLV doesn't have a great history in appeals with the NCAA, there is reason to hope this one will be granted. The minimum ACT/SAT scores and minimum GPA are now on a sliding scale for incoming freshmen, and Turner finished with a 2.53 in the core high school classes.

The Rebels and Turner also have recent history on their side with the Zach Randolph (Michigan State) case just over a year ago. Randolph won an appeal that allowed him to play as a full qualifier despite scoring an 800 on the SAT. Randolph took the test on several occasions with the 800 being the highest score. The NCAA did not offer a reason for their decision to allow Randolph to play.

Also a year ago, University of Florida's Orien Green's appeal to play was granted by the NCAA despite failing to meet the minimum score on both the SAT and the ACT. After failing his attempts, Greene was accepted to Florida as a partial qualifier. But Green and the Gators filed the appeal with the NCAA citing the Zach Randolph case, and won.

It appears that a worst-case scenario would leave Turner this season as a partial qualifier. This would allow Turner, while on an athletic scholarship, to practice with the team, eat with the team, and receive the same academic support services as other players, but he would not be allowed to play this season. The NCAA has also recently begun to let partial qualifiers earn back a 4th year of eligibility, only if the student-athlete graduates in a 4 year period. The only other option for Turner is to retake the SAT in the fall. If he were to pass, he would be eligible to play for the Rebels after the conclusion of the fall semester.

Turner has made it clear no matter what happens with the appeal, he WILL be a Rebel even if it means waiting until next season to play. You have to love this kid's loyalty to the program. We at RebelReoprt.com and all the UNLV fans wish ET the best of luck getting through this and wearing the Rebel Scarlet and Gray soon!

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