Trojan legend Marv Goux passes away

Marv Goux, the embodiment of Trojan spirit as an assistant football coach at USC for 26 years and one-time USC team captain, died on Saturday (July 27) in Los Angeles of cancer. He was 69.

from usctrojans.com:

Goux, who also was an assistant with the Los Angeles Rams, will be cremated in a private ceremony in Santa Barbara.

A public memorial service will be held on the USC campus in the coming weeks (the date will be announced soon).

In lieu of flowers, his family has requested donations in Goux's name be made to either the USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center and Hospital (1441 Eastlake Ave. #8302, Los Angeles, Calif. 90089-9181) or the USC Athletic Department (Heritage Hall 203, Los Angeles, Calif. 90089-0602).

"A big part of the Trojan Family is gone," said USC athletic director Mike Garrett, who played at USC while Goux was on the coaching staff. "Marv Goux was the epitome of a Trojan. He touched so many people and meant so much to so many of us. We'll all miss him dearly."

A 3-year starter (1952, 1954-55) for the Trojans (he was hurt in 1953), Goux twice won USC's Davis-Teschke Award, given annually to the team's most inspirational player. His teammates elected him a captain in 1955. He played in 2 Rose Bowls. He went both ways (at center and linebacker) in his final 2 seasons.

Goux, who starred despite being just 5-10 and 185 pounds, came to USC after winning JC All-American honors as a linebacker at Ventura (Calif.) Junior College in 1951. He prepped at Santa Barbara (Calif.) High.

After graduating from USC with a bachelor's degree in physical education in 1956, Goux became the head coach at Carpinteria (Calif.) High and guided the team to the 1956 CIF Small Schools final, going 9-1.

During his coaching career at USC (1957-82), he served under head coaches Don Clark, John McKay and John Robinson. USC won five national championships and played in 11 Rose Bowls (winning 8) during his coaching tenure. He coached 10 first team All-Americans (Gary Jeter, John Grant, Charles Weaver, Al Cowlings, Jimmy Gunn, Tim Rossovich, Damon Bame, Ron Mix, and Marlin and the late Mike McKeever). He was the head freshman coach and a varsity assistant his first 3 seasons at USC, then moved up to the varsity full time in 1960. He was named assistant head coach in 1977 by Robinson.

Goux was inducted into the USC Athletic Hall of Fame as a member of the inaugural 1994 class and then was inducted into the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame in 2000. In March of 2002, he received an Alumni Service Award from USC. Goux's Gate, the entrance to the USC football practice field on campus, is named after him. The Marv Goux Award is given annually to the Trojan player of the game versus UCLA. The Marv Goux "Trojan For Life" Award is presented annually to a USC alumnus who gives back to the football program.

The inspirational Goux was known as "Mr. Trojan" to many USC fans. He never referred to the school as USC, but always reverently as "The University of Southern California." He was so strongly identified with USC that Robinson once said, "When he dies, we'll bury him under the front steps of the athletic department."

Tough and competitive, he was simultaneously feared and loved by his players. He also was highly-regarded for his good sportsmanship, as it was his tradition to personally congratulate the players of every opposing team that beat USC.

Known for his motivational speeches to players and fans, Goux was particularly passionate about the annual USC-Notre Dame game. He once said the game was "big man on big man" and "when you play in this game, you remember it for the rest of your life."

Goux left USC in 1983 to become an assistant with the Rams under Robinson. He then became an administrator for the Rams in 1990 before retiring in 1994.

He was active with the Trojan Club of the Desert during his retirement.

He is survived by his wife, Patti, of Palm Desert; his daughter, Linda Kanen, of Newport Beach, plus his son-in-law, Douglas Kanen, and his 4 grandchildren, Kara, Katie, Jack and Holly Kanen; and his brother, James, of Carpinteria.


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