WAZZU HOOPS: From A to Z

PULLMAN -- Schools are switching conferences faster than coaches are switching schools these days, so an A-Z look at Washington State basketball might be in order, to put things in order, as the 2010-11 season starts to get cranked up to full throttle.

A is for Academics -- Abe Lodwick, a junior forward on the Cougars this season, made the Pac-10 All-Academic second team last season.

B is for Bohler -- The home gym of Cougars basketball the last time Washington State won a conference championship and the only time the Cougars played in the NCAA title game (1940-41).

C is for Casto -- DeAngelo Casto became the first Cougar in 30 years to lead the Pac-10 in blocked shots last season.

D is for Defense -- Washington State went from leading NCAA Division I in average points allowed (55.4) in 2008-09 all the way down to No. 232, (70.6) in 2009-10.

E is for ESPN -- Pac-10 players, voting in an ESPN The Magazine poll, named WSU junior guard Klay Thompson the Pac-10's best player.

F is for Forty-eight -- The Washington State 2A tournament record for points in a single game, set by freshman forward Patrick Simon when he played for Ephrata last season.

G is for Goalkeeper -- In addition to basketball, 6-foot-10 walk-on Chris McNamara was a goalkeeper on the soccer team at Bellevue Community College (McNamara grew up in England).

H is for Half -- The percentage of WSU's coaching staff that coached or played for arch-rival Washington (head coach Ken Bone was an assistant coach, Curtis Allen played guard).

I is for Inconsistent -- The Cougars won 10 of their first 12 games last season, then lost 10 of their last 12 games.

J is for Jumpers -- Klay Thompson made (76) and attempted (209) more 3-pointers than any sophomore in WSU history last season, but his 3-point shooting percentage (36.4) did not crack the top 10 for sophomores.

K is for Koprivica -- Nikola Koprivica, the lone senior on the Cougars last season, was averaging 21.7 points after seven games in the top pro league in his native Serbia.

L is for Lament -- The Cougars suffered through the longest stretch of consecutive losing seasons (10) in school history before embarking on the current string of four straight winning seasons.

M is for Medalist -- Paul Enquist, the father of junior post Charlie Enquist, rowed for WSU and won a gold medal in double sculls at the 1984 Summer Olympics.

N is for None -- The number of Cougars who have ever scored more points as a sophomore than Klay Thompson did last season (602).

O is for One -- The number of coaches since 1928-29 who topped Ken Bone's 16-15 record last season in their first year as coach of the Cougars (Tony Bennett went 26-8 in 2006-07).

P is for Puidokas -- Steve Puidokas holds the career record of 18.6 points per game at WSU.

Q is for Quinnett -- Brian Quinnett, WSU's only first-team Academic All-American in men's basketball, earned that honor in 1989.

R is for Reggie -- Point guard Reggie Moore was named the best passer in the Pac-10 by Sporting News magazine.

S is for Sixty -- WSU's largest margin of victory (71-11 versus Montana in 1914).

T is for Taylor -- Popular ex-Cougar guard Taylor Rochestie is now playing pro ball in Turkey after making a successful pro debut last season in Germany.

U is for Ultimate -- More commonly known as Ultimate Frisbee, Reggie Moore lettered in the sport when not playing basketball at Brewster Academy prep school in Wolfeboro, N.H.

V is for Victory – The Cougars have more wins the past four seasons than all but two Pac-10 rivals (UCLA 105, Washington 87, WSU 85).

W is for Washington -- The only team ESPN college basketball guru Doug Gottlieb picks to finish ahead of Washington State in the Pac-10 this season.

X is for Xavier -- Xavier Thames, WSU's first guard off the bench last season, transferred to San Diego State.

Y is for Young -- After playing with just one senior last season, the Cougars now have no seniors on the 2010-11 roster.

Z is for Zero -- The number of points Washington State scored in its first basketball game, a 31-0 loss to the Spokane YMCA in 1901.


Cougfan Top Stories