An Opponent's View: WR Terrell Bynum

With the 2017 class signed, we made calls to some coaches and players who faced off against each Husky signee and got their thoughts on what made them so tough to go up against. Today we take a look at St. John Bosco (Bellflower, Ca.) WR Terrell Bynum...

The Story - Bynum chose Washington in the spring (April) over offers from USC, UCLA, Oklahoma, Notre Dame, Tennessee,Michigan,Louisville,Miami (Fl), Arizona State and Arizona among others. He was one of the top wideouts in the West in the 2017 class with many raving about his natural receiving and open-field running skills.

Senior Season Stats - Bynum transferred to St. John Bosco for his senior season and he led the team in receptions with 58 while ranking second on the team with 737 yards and seven touchdowns. Bynum earned First Team All-Trinity League and was named to the Long Beach Telegram Dream Team.

Opposing Coach's View - "Honestly, he's the guy I would like to clone if I could do it. He's smart, athletic, fast, has good hands and a feel for defenses and how to find the soft-spot in zones. He's not super-strong, so when we were physical against him, that's when he struggled. I think as he gets stronger, that won't be as much of an issue for him, but he loves to get free releases and if you let him run free, he'll kill you. He's explosive, so when he catches the ball, you'd better make the tackle because he'll make plays with his legs. He loves a broken field where he can use his quickness and vision to make plays. (St. John Bosco) didn't use him as much as I thought they would, but he was the guy, if you watch their game film, that schools rolled their coverages to, so they went to the other side most of the time. We definitely did that against them."

Opposing players' view - "Our coaches all told us to get up and in his face. He hated guys being physical against him. You could see it in his eyes. If he got off the press though, he really did some damage. He doesn't talk much. We called him the 'silent assassin' because he just went about his business and just kept coming at you. He isn't a great blocker, but he'll cut (block) you when you aren't expecting it, so it was tough to get our hands down to keep him off our legs. When he gets into his route, he doesn't give away much, so it's tough to read where he's going. Probably the biggest compliment I can give him is that he runs every route the same way -- 100-percent -- and he can hurt you on short routes or on the deep pass."


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