Camp Notebook

A compendium of notes and items from West Virginia's football camps

Stephon Robertson put up a strong bid in his attempt to earn a scholarship offer. Robertson moved well and showed good range, which would help at either of his prospective positions of safety or linebacker.

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All of West Virginia's coaches except for Chris Beatty were present at the camp. Beatty was out of town.

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Logan Thomas, who also has designs on basketball offers, was a standout in more ways than one. Towering over most of the offensive skill position players, Thomas demonstrated great agility during individual drills, and capped it with several sparkling catches during one-on-ones.

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Offensive lineman Joe Madsen was among the first of the freshmen to report for their initial week at West Virginia. Madsen, accompanied by family members, looks even more massive than he did at the end of his senior season of high school.

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Running backs Mark Rodgers and Zach Hulse may have been under the radar on the national recruiting scene, but both look imposing in person and have impressed in initial summer workouts. Either, or the combination of both, could be the answer to WVU's depth issues at running back.

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Hillside High School in Durham, N.C., brought two coaches and three players to the camp.

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Craig Crawford, who has transferred from Huntington (w. Va.) High School to Nitro High School, participated in the camp as a wide receiver. He could also be a prospect at safety.

Among the players attending but not participating in camp were Travis Hawkins, who had a cast on his wrist which prevented his participation, Tavon Austin, Zach McCray (ankle strain suffered at Virginia Tech's camp and exacerbated at Wake Forest the following week) and Jason Ankarah.

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Morgan Moses, Jerod Askew and Shawne Alston (virus) were not at the camp. Dominik Davenport is taking a summer school class that prevented his attendance.

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WVU commitments on hand included Tajh Boyd, Logan Heastie, Jordan Weingart, Ja'tavious Miller, Cole Bowers, and Chris Snook. Snook is an impressively built player who looks as if he's ready to step on a college field right now. Weingart appears to be a mauler. Although the camps are conducted without pads, it's clear that he's comfortable making contact and being the aggressor in heads-up conflicts.

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Cody Walko, the younger brother of current offensive lineman Jon Walko, also went through drills. Cody (6-4, 250 lbs.) is one year younger than most players in his class, and could follow a greyshirt or prep school route following his senior season.

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Among the juniors on hand were Riverside (W. Va.) High School's Raheem Waiters and Chris Dunkley of Royal Palm Beach (Fla.) High School. Dunkley had no problem creating separation from defenders and reeling in the passes of Boyd and WVU graduate assistant JaJuan Seider.

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Footwork is often the bane of offensive linemen coming from high school and many got their first taste of using kick steps in pass blocking and slides under the direction of WVU offensive line coach Dave Johnson. These are just some of the many technical details that are under-taught in the high school ranks, but are vital to collegiate success. Johnson and defensive line coach Bill Kirelawich spent much of their time instructing players on technique work during individual and the line's one-on-one drills.


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