The Crazy World Of College Recruiting

What does MM, LM- or prospect mean? Here is a simple guide I use in the evaluation of prospects across California...

Division I recruiting.  The Cliff notes guide to the crazy world of college basketball/football recruting.

Think of players falling into 5 categories:
HM... HM-MM... MM... MM-LM...LM...

RPI Ratings are used:  Rating of Strength of program in which each school is ranked overall
There are 32 NCAA DI leagues in men's basketball... 300 plus teams in the RPI... So I break
it down in thirds, Top 10, 2nd 10, etc.
Over the past 3 years in the West its been pretty consistent as follows:
#1 Pac 10
#2 Mountain West
#3 WAC
#4 WCC (beat out WAC one year as #3)
#5 Big West
#6 Big Sky (beat out Big West 2 years ago)

Pac 10 & Mtn West are legit HMs...
The WAC is a low HM... the WCC is a good MM league w/ one top 25 team
(Zags)...
The top teams in the Big West (Utah State, UCSB & UCI) can play with anyone
in the WCC...
The 2nd division of the WAC, WCC & Big West are all competitive with each
other as MM...
The top team in the Big Sky is certainly a good MM caliber team every year,
but its usually just one team...

So here's the deal...
To get someone to be recruited or looked at by a WCC or Big West,
and unfortunately even a Big Sky program, a player must have a MM ranking...

We use the "LM-MM" grade for someone like Ryan McCurdy... LM guy with MM upside in
time...
The size of bigs or talls in McCurdy's case warrants the extra look from
schools... He signed at NAU.

Most coaches mistake skinny for soft, and its
not always the case...

Another thing we use is the term "follow" vs "prospect"...
Its pretty subtle, but a MM follow is not as strong as a MM prospect...
The prospect is a definite, finished opinon... The follow is used for
younger kids, or players we are not sure of...


It really comes down to "can play" or "can't play"... Either you like a player or you don't...
All the grading breakdowns are really overrated.

Rankings are vastly overrated. We usually tell coaches if they like #6 on our list. They should also look at #5, #7. #8.#9.

Small College-DII-DIII-NAIA

Typically not the same. Here is the rule, but always there are exceptions.

DII & NAIA recruit same level players. Ones that get missed, or late developers hoping to snag a great one.
First priority in my opinion are DI transfers. (For top DII and NAIA programs.

There is a huge misconception that playing at the DII or NAIA level is a failure, or the level of play is way down. WRONG!

For example, Tim Kruge (former VC player and Small Ball Player of year last year.) Many felt he was a DI player. He decided to go to Point Loma University in San Diego (my alma mater) an NAIA School.

He played well, but last season he averaged around 10 minutes a game. Because the transition is so difficult for any level. Kruge will go on and have a great career but most felt he would dominate from the start.

Anyway, DII and NAIA look at "Low Major" first. Then work their way down. DIII look at Low Major with exceptional grades and work their way down. Plus all 3 rely big time on contacts to help their recruiting because of lack of budget etc...


Hope this helps in the recruiting process, but the bottom line is PLAY HARD!  They will notice.

Gary Trousdale


Golden State Preps Top Stories