NBA Draft Profile: C.J. Miles

In the days leading up to the June 28 NBA Draft, SchoolSports.com will give you scouting reports on the 10 high school players with a shot to be selected in the first or second round of this year's draft. Today, we profile Skyline (Dallas, Texas) shooting guard C.J. Miles.


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C.J. Miles
Skyline (Dallas, Texas)
Shooting Guard, 6-6, 210


Strengths: Miles is an all-around talent with a smooth game. He's got a great outside shot with excellent range thanks to a silky lefty stroke, and his ball-handling and passing skills are good enough to play some spot duty at point guard. In fact, he's so versatile that he played everywhere from the point to the post in high school. His long arms make him a good rebounder from the backcourt and could allow him to be an excellent defender. He's also a hard worker, spending countless extra hours in the gym trying to fine-tune his game.

Weaknesses: While Miles' all-around game is one of his greatest assets, it's also the basis for one of the biggest knocks on him — that he doesn't do any one thing extremely well. In other words, that he doesn't have an NBA-ready skill that will help him make the transition to the pros. Although he's a solid athlete, he lacks the explosion and quickness that most NBA swingmen are blessed with. He's also not physically ready for the NBA and needs to add muscle to his skinny frame.

The Lowdown: Of the 10 serious preps-to-pros prospects this year, Miles' decision to enter the draft was the biggest surprise. He doesn't have any academic issues that would prevent him from going to college, and although he's a solid top 20 recruit, he's not the type of elite-level prospect who usually goes straight to the NBA. When he entered the draft, the prevailing thinking was that he was just testing the waters and would pull out by the June 21 withdrawal deadline and head to Texas. But his dad told the Dallas Morning News earlier this week that Miles will likely remain in the draft. That prompted speculation that Miles has received a first-round promise from some team — or at least enough feedback to strongly believe he'll be selected in the first round. If not, this is an odd choice because he's been projected by most mock drafts as a second-rounder, which would mean no guaranteed contract. This will be an interesting situation to watch leading up to both the June 21 withdrawal deadline and the June 28 draft.


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