Top 5 Super Bowl Host Cities

The Super Bowl has been played 48 times, at 24 different stadiums in 15 different cities. Glendale will get its second shot at hosting a Super Bowl this Sunday, still rookie when compared to the most gracious hosts in the U.S. Los Angeles has hosted the big game seven times alone, but hasn’t had another chance since 1993. It’s not easy being a host either.

The Super Bowl has been played 48 times, at 24 different stadiums in 15 different cities. Glendale will get its second shot at hosting a Super Bowl this Sunday, still rookie when compared to the most gracious hosts in the U.S. Los Angeles has hosted the big game seven times alone, but hasn’t had another chance since 1993. It’s not easy being a host either.

The list of demands the NFL sends grows every year and requires things like free police escorts for the week, free promotional space from the local newspapers and radio stations and free access to three top golf courses in the months (yes, months) before the game. Think being exempt from state, county and municipal taxes during their stay is worth mentioning? Either way, there are a few cities that manage to handle the craze better than the rest. These are the lucky few.

5. Houston

The site of Super Bowl LI is one of the great sports cities in the country. Three major sports franchises, plenty of roads and more than two million citizens driving all over them. It’ll be the third time the Space City has landed the Super Bowl and its successful turn in 2004 gives it credibility in the modern era. Houston had to fend off San Francisco and Indianapolis for this spot, but the margin of victory was pretty comfortable.

4. Tampa

There is an argument that this beautiful location is growing on the NFL more than any other city. Tampa has hosted the third most Super Bowls since hosting its first in 1984. That’s almost a 20-year head start for the rest of America’s biggest markets. Florida’s second biggest city has proven itself from the pros to the collegiate sports scene and if that isn’t enough, well, there’s always the beach.

3. Dallas

Dallas is short on experience. For now. AT&T Stadium hosted Super Bowl XLV less than two years from its completion date and it was already eligible for the 2018 version not long after. They didn’t win the bid, but it’s a safe bet Jerry’s World will get its fair share of chances to host the Super Bowl and start moving up the list.

2. New Orleans

The Big Easy may have been given the #1 spot had it not been for a little *cough cough* lighting problem not so long ago. Other than that there’s no reason to expect the NFL won’t return to the land of hurricanes and Mardi Gras beads. Tied for first with 10 Super Bowls under its belt, Louisiana’s largest city is a big hit with tourists, media and players alike. Nola is a big city where everything still feels like everything’s in walking distance and it’s coming on strong again nearly a decade after Hurricane Katrina.

1. Miami

Our best host city is the ideal spot for the biggest sports event there is. There’s lots of space, roads that don’t get congested with all the incoming/outgoing traffic and about as much entertainment as can be packed safely into one city. Miami’s a thriving metropolis with winning sports franchises, but still appeals to the everyday tourist. There’s good, inexpensive restaurants but also caters to those with richer tastes. Also coming in with 10 Super Bowls, Magic City has something for everyone, but also maintains the mystery and glamour of the best host city around.

Which city do you think is the perfect Super Bowl host? Let us know in the Forum

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